July 17th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Hutcheson, John A. Jr. (JOHN) 18-Jul    
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) 20-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Scott, Catherine Scott, William M. 17-Jul  
Tharpe, Julie Tharpe, Henry C. 22-Jul  
Bundros, Laura Bundros, Thomas A 22-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) 7/19/2016 2  
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) 7/19/2016 2  
Cooke, Christopher M (CHRIS) 7/19/2016 2  
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) 7/19/2016 2  
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) 7/19/2016 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) Annelle 17-Jul 18
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA SRIVASTAVA) Vinai 20-Jul 42
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) Carla 21-Jul 17
Schneller, April D (APRIL) Douglas 23-Jul 24


The Year Ahead

by John Hutcheson


President Greg

President Greg introduced the Board for 2018-2019, and with an eye on 2019-2020 he inducted Amanda Reed as President-Elect. He gave heartfelt thanks to the Club for honoring him with its presidency for the current year. Greg came to Dalton in 2014 to head the Northwest Georgia Healthcare Partnership, and his predecessor in that post (and Club Past President), Nancy Kennedy, immediately brought him into Rotary membership. He had visited the Club in 2011 for a presentation by Nathan Deal, who was then transitioning from Congress to the Governor’s Mansion, and although he and Governor Deal discussed health care, Greg’s most outstanding memory of that occasion was of the warm welcome he received from Club members and the sense that these were people who got things done in and for their community.

Turning to his aspirations for the coming year, Greg set out three goals. The first is to make our club a Gold Level Club, and while RI’s point system for doing so has become less stringent, we nevertheless need to tighten up on such matters as attendance at weekly meetings (including conscientious use of make-ups) and at District conferences—each table had flyers advertising the District 6910 Conference to be held at Greenville, SC on May 2-5, 2019.

Greg’s second goal is directed toward the quality and diversity of our membership. While he believes we could easily grow to 200 members, quantity is less important than quality, and our focus should be on recruiting upcoming community leaders and broadening our roster beyond the older white men who still comprise its majority by inducting more women, Latinos, African-Americans, and others who will help the Club reflect the diversity of Dalton itself. This effort connects easily with Greg’s third goal—to simply have fun, not only through regular R&R events but also by thinking creatively about different types of meetings that will attract new members.

Realizing these goals depends on individual commitments, and Greg urged each member to set one or more personal Rotary goals for the coming year, whether through achieving perfect attendance (putting make-ups as a priority), becoming a Paul Harris or Will Watt Fellow, serving on the Board or other committees, presenting a program, or in whatever way will strengthen the Club and its effectiveness in the community. He closed by once more thanking the Club for giving him the opportunity to serve.

Announcements and Recognitions

Club Administration Chair Chris Cooke encouraged members to offer suggestions for programs during 2018-2019. Rotarian Natima Walker described the upcoming fundraiser for the The GreenHouse, a project called Rock and Rappel; this will kick off on July 15 and will entail instruction in rappelling, culminating on November 3 with a rappelling competition on the Landmark Building and a rock concert. Rotarian Amanda Burt reminded members about the Summer Book Study being sponsored by the United Way.



July 10th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Pangle, William T (TODD) 10-Jul    
Stewart, Robert T (ROBERT) 13-Jul    
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) 13-Jul    
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) 14-Jul    
Thomas, Don R. (DON) 14-Jul    
Denson, Jason B (JASON) 14-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Cruse, Amy Cruse, Lesley Dale 11-Jul  
Kinard, Bob Kinard, Dixie 13-Jul  
Townsend, Teresa Townsend, Patrick J. 15-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) 7/10/2007 11  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Combs, William Dan (DAN) Donna 11-Jul 48
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) Carole 15-Jul 23
Neal, John P. III(JOHN) Terri 15-Jul 46
Hutcheson, John A. Jr.(JOHN) Marilyn 15-Jul 51


Rotary and the GED at GNTC: An Update

by John Hutcheson

President Kevin reviewed how the Club sponsors scholarships at Georgia Northwestern Technical College for students pursuing the GED certification. This program, which began under Past President Bruce Satterfield and will continue under President Greg, provides matching grants to needy GNTC students for up to 25 full scholarships or a larger number of partial scholarships. The results are measurable, and they serve the community by enlarging the pool of qualified candidates from which local employers can draw.

Smitty Barnett followed President Kevin and related how Rotarians often help those in the community who have nowhere else to turn for help as they seek to improve their situations. The GED grant program is a fine example of this, and Smitty introduced Cindy Nelson, Adult Education Lead Teacher and Site Manager at GNTC’s Dalton Campus. With a degree in math from Georgia Tech, she worked at Crown Crafts and Mohawk before joining GNTC. As Lead Instructor in the GED program for the last four years, her teaching has focused foremost on people themselves, using English, social studies, and mathematics as her vehicles.


Cindy Nelson

Cindy began by thanking the Club for its help with the GED program. She said that the final test has four parts—English (reading and writing), math, science, and social studies—with each part costing the student $40. Rotary provides $3,700 in total assistance per year, for which students must complete at least forty hours of study to be eligible to share. Students’ ages in the GED program at GNTC range from sixteen to sixty, with the majority of those who receive aid using it for two parts of the test. Classes are available at no charge during the day, evening, and online. Approximately forty students will complete the test this year in Dalton, and Cindy noted that many ESOL students go on to enter the GED program. She also pointed out that employees from nine Northwest Georgia companies comprised the largest number of GED graduates of any area in the state last year.

Passing the Gavel 2018

Following Cindy’s presentation, President Kevin concluded his term by thanking the Club for having elected him and for all the support he has received during the past year—passing that along made the day a bittersweet occasion for him. He is proud of the Club’s achievements during his presidency, among which were continuation of the GED support program, the addition of twelve new Paul Harris Fellows and six new Will Watt Fellows, productive drives to benefit the GreenHouse and Red Cross, another year of bell-ringing for the Salvation Army, a successful Golf Tournament, recognition of outstanding fifth graders and awarding of scholarships to a truly extraordinary group of high school graduates, and a series of consistently informative and entertaining weekly programs. Members gave President Kevin a standing ovation for his service, after which he thanked the Board collectively and individually. He is grateful to all his fellow Rotarians for helping him grow personally, especially as a public speaker. He also thanked the staff of the Dalton Golf and Country Club for their food and service and called them out from the kitchen to be recognized.

As his last official act, President Kevin swore in President-Elect Greg Dent as President for 2018-2019 and passed the presidential pin and gavel to his custody. President Greg, in turn, thanked now Past President Kevin for his help in preparing him for his new responsibilities and presented him with a commemorative gavel and plaque.


Passing the Gavel

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin reminded members that there will be no meeting on July 3 and that Greg Dent’s first meeting as President will be on July 10. Past President John Richmond presented a plaque to Rotarian Zach Taylor and his wife, Joanie, in recognition of their service as GRSP hosts during the past year and announced that they would be recognized as the Club’s newest Will Watt Fellows.


New Will Watt Fellows

Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett introduced President-Elect Greg and Club Administration Chair Chris Cooke as the Club’s most recent Paul Harris Fellows; their inductions make a total of twelve new Paul Harris Fellows added to the Club’s roster during the 2017-2018 year.


Paul Harris Fellows



June 26th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Brown, Alex C (ALEX) 27-Jun    
Little, William Norris Sr. (NORRIS) 28-Jun    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Walker, Jason Walker, Natima G 30-Jun  
Maret, Sarah Maret, Charles D. 1-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) 6/30/2004 14  
Dent, Gregory J (GREG) 7/1/2014 4  
Weaver, William B (BILL) 7/1/1969 49  
Thomas, Don R. (DON) 7/1/1973 45  
Denson, Jason B (JASON) 7/1/2018 0  
O'Neill, Michael Paul (MIKE) 7/1/2010 8  
Jones, J Sherwood III(SHERWOOD) 7/1/1996 22  
Norris, Bradley B (BRAD) 7/1/2018 0  
Gilreath, Judy Ellen (JUDY) 7/1/2013 5  
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr.(MAURICE) 7/1/1980 38  
Payne, Charles F Jr(CHUCK) 7/1/2017 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) Sara 26-Jun 22
O'Neill, Michael Paul (MIKE) Lin 30-Jun 34
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) Bill 1-Jul 51
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) Phyllis 1-Jul 51
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) Linda 1-Jul 51
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr.(ROY) Pat 2-Jul 52


Memories of the Masters



by John Hutcheson

President Kevin introduced Club member Doug Hoskins, who served as an Official Scorer at the Masters from 1969 to 1988. A native of Chatham, Ontario, in his early years Doug aspired to become a hockey player, but an injury prompted him to shift his main energies to golf. After winning two tournaments, he became a golf professional and in 1950 he began working with the Greater Greensboro Open. Eventually he earned a degree in accounting from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and was employed by Shaw Industries, from which he retired in 2000. While working for the Arthur Andersen accounting firm in Atlanta in the late 1960’s, he got an opportunity to help score the Masters, with whom Arthur Andersen had a contract, and this began a twenty-year run of witnessing and interacting with the world’s leading golfers. Doug is married to Carole, herself an accomplished golfer, and he has been a Rotarian for twelve years, eight of which were as a member of the Carpet City Club.


Doug Hoskins

Doug said that while much of the scoring work at the Masters is now done by computer, many of the procedures he followed still apply. Players record each other’s scores—no player records his own—on a hole-by-hole basis. Totals are calculated by Official Scorers using the Rule of Four, whereby each hole is nominally a par four, a method which simplifies determining who’s above or below par overall

During his work at the Masters, Doug saw plenty of ecstasy, agony, and everything in between, and he recounted a number of incidents involving world-famous players at moments of extreme emotional intensity. Turning to specific personalities, he briefly sketched some of the most legendary players golf has produced over the last fifty or sixty years, all but one of whom won the Masters at least once.

In Doug’s opinion, Sam Snead probably had the best golf swing of anyone. A colorful, bigger-than-life character, he was full of stories and a master of gamesmanship, known for such tricks as distracting his opponents while they were putting and other antics. Arnold Palmer, more than anyone, elevated the game to the standing it has today. Always a gentleman, he never said a bad word about anyone or any course and patiently filled every request for his autograph. He also had the largest hands and forearms Doug can remember seeing on any golfer.

Gary Player, a very competitive golfer and holder of many records, was the best bunker player Doug saw, and Fred Couples was a superb player who took great pride in his accomplishments. Billy Casper approached the game very seriously and was one of the greatest putters. Jack Nicklaus was the best clutch player of his time, extremely competitive and, because of color blindness, able to see only green and white. Lee Trevino never won the Masters, but he was a poor boy from Texas who hustled his way into the game’s top echelon while remaining a loose and comical player—it was said that he “dated the ball.” Ben Crenshaw, like Arnold Palmer, never complained and was liked by everyone—many thought of him as golf’s greatest ambassador.

Doug closed by emphasizing that the Masters is an extremely well-run tournament, and he considers it a great privilege to have been selected as a scorer. He directed members’ attention to a framed plaque holding the autographs of every Masters champion from the years when he served, commenting that while he had been offered as much as $5,000 for it, to him it was priceless.

Announcements and Inductions

President Kevin reminded members that he will pass the presidential gavel to President-Elect Greg Dent at the June 26 meeting, which will also have a program on students’ completion of GED requirements through the auspices of Georgia Northwestern Technical College.

After reviewing the mission and ideals of Rotary, Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead led the induction of new members Brad Norris, sponsored by Smitty Barnett, and Jason Denson, sponsored by Bob Brooker.


New inductees and sponsors

 

 



June 19 Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) 21-Jun    
Weaver, William B (BILL) 21-Jun    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Combs, Donna Combs, William Dan 24-Jun  
Neal, Terri Neal, John P. III 24-Jun  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) 6/20/2006 12  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Didier, John M. (JOHN) Cathy 19-Jun 36
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) Melissa 21-Jun 15
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) Sally 23-Jun 42
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) Ginny 25-Jun 13


Family Frameworks: They Reach The Heart

by Darla Chambliss

Cherri Robertson, Membership Chair, introduced Katie Walker, Program Director for Family Frameworks. Family Frameworks is a non-profit organization supporting families. The mission statement explains the work of the group: We believe in transforming mindsets in such a way that it flows to the heart, becomes who we are, and changes our community. Katie is an Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW) with 7 years of experience working with children and families. It is her passion to support families by educating the community about healthy relationships and empowering couples to have strong healthy marriages.


Katie Walker

Family Frameworks was founded in 2004 by Executive Director Kathy Schleier. Kathy, a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner with over 30 years of experience working with children and families, is stepping down from the Executive Director role to spend more time with her family.

Katie and Kathy share a healthy respect for values and family.

The Family Frameworks team has grown to include Rachel and Caleb Callahan, a married couple volunteering time to Family Frameworks as they feel the message is so necessary to our community. Mr. Callahan recently returned home to Dalton after traveling extensively due to career opportunities. His travels to Haiti and Angola prison convinced him that “morality was missing from the culture.” Mr. Callahan said, “we should not be so arrogant as to think this could not happen here [in the U.S.]” Caleb jumped onboard to help with Family Frameworks “because they reach the heart.” He said, “mindset matters, it controls the heart.”


Caleb Callahan

Popular Classes are the Healthy Choices Class, Divorcing Parents Classes and Marriage Rebuilding Classes.

The next fundraiser is Friday, August 3rd at Walnut Hill Farms with former University of Alabama football player John McIntosh. For more information or to volunteer, please contact Katie Walker at katiewalker@familyframeworks.us or call 706-313-002

New Member Induction: Past President Bruce introduced our newest member Ms. Natima Walker, Executive Director of the GreenHouse. Chris Cooke, Club Administration Chair, is Natima’s sponsoring member. Natima comes to our club from the Rotary Club of Dalton. Ms. Walker has been a regular speaker and visitor at our club and we are delighted to have her as a member.


Natima Walker



May 22nd Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) 23-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Elliott, S. G. Elliott, Judy M. 22-May  
Bradham, Melissa Bradham, Robert L. 26-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) 5/24/2016 2  
McFarland, Frances M. (BITSY) 5/25/1999 19  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) David 24-May 32
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) Carolyn 24-May 49
Barlow, Jonathan L (JONATHAN) Susan 26-May 11
Ryman, Milton J. Jr.(MILTON) Mary 28-May 69


Rotary Scholarship Awards Day 2018

by John Hutcheson

One of the highlights of the Rotary year is the annual Scholarship Awards Day, when students selected by high schools in Dalton and Whitfield County are honored for their exceptional accomplishments in mathematics and the sciences, the humanities, career technology, and service. At this time the Club also recognizes students qualifying for its support to attend the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) camp during the upcoming summer. Finally, a $500 scholarship is awarded to each participating school’s nominee as its outstanding student overall, and one of these is chosen by a committee of Club members to receive an additional $500 for truly superior achievement. This year’s scholarship committee consisted of Rotarians Jonathan Bledsoe (Chair), Rob Bradham, John Hutcheson, Douglas McClure, Judson Manley, Maurice Sponcler, and Barbara Ward.


RYLA students

Jonathan Bledsoe presented this year’s RYLA participants. Garrett Hughes and Meg Gulledge from Coahulla Creek and Hayden Brock and Austin Burt from Dalton, all of whom will be sponsored by our club. Also recognized were AnnaMarie Ramsey and Savannah York from Southeast Whitfield, representing other Rotary clubs which underwrote sponsorships but allowed their RYLA spaces to be filled by the Dalton club.

Jonathan opened the presentation of Outstanding Students by welcoming visiting family members and school personnel who were attending in support of their students, and he called on various committee members to announce the students and their schools.

Maurice Sponcler presented the Outstanding Math/Science Students:

Harrison Hughes – Dalton
Henley Henderson – Northwest Whitfield 
Joshua Herrera – Southeast Whitfield 
Rodrigo Paramo – Coahulla Creek 
Sydney Stafford – Christian Heritage

John Hutcheson presented the Outstanding Humanities Students:

Bianca Munguia – Dalton 
Cassandra Trollinger – Northwest Whitfield 
Escarlet Fernandez – Southeast Whitfield 
Presley Sneed – Coahulla Creek 
Wyatt Huggins – Christian Heritage

Jonathan Bledsoe presented the Outstanding Career Technology Students:

Ellie Downey – Northwest Whitfield 
Jacob Hawkins – Coahulla Creek  
Kelsey Hubbard – Southeast Whitfield 
Linda Olivera – Dalton
Morrison Outlaw – Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy
Nayeli Gutierrez – Morris Innovative

Douglas McClure presented the Outstanding Service Students:

Ashley Munoz – Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy 
Chloe Sirmans – Southeast Whitfield 
Henley Henderson – Northwest Whitfield 
Laura-Anne Jackson – Christian Heritage 
Rachel Walker – Coahulla Creek 
Samuel Stuart – Dalton 
Yingrey Alvarado – Morris Innovative

Jonathan Bledsoe returned to announce the nominees for overall Outstanding Area Student:

Jolene Gale – Northwest Whitfield 
Josiah Hastey – Southeast Whitfield 
Leah Shelton – Dalton 
Meghan Higgins – Christian Heritage 
Meredith Barber – Coahulla Creek


Outstanding area students

From this unusually competitive field Meredith Barber was selected as the Rotary Outstanding Area Student for 2018. Plaques listing her and all other winners since the program’s beginning in 1989 will be displayed at Coahulla Creek High School during the coming year.


Meredith Barber



May 29th and June 5th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Kiker, Janice F. (JANICE) 30-May    
Bestawros, Onsy A (ONSY) 31-May    
Venable, William M (WILLIAM) 1-Jun    
Brooker, Robert H. (BOB) 1-Jun    
Croft, Brian C (BRIAN) 9-Jun    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Venable, Ruth Venable, William M 29-May  
Morris, Sarah (SASSY) Brown, Alex C 30-May  
Anderson, Adina Anderson, Michael S 1-Jun  
Abernathy, Gretchen Abernathy, Melburn H. 2-Jun  
Sanford, Teresa Sanford, Robert Mitchell 5-Jun  
Barlow, Susan Barlow, Jonathan L 11-Jun  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Richmond, John D. (JOHN) 6/1/1985 33  
Patterson, Frank W Jr.(FRANK) 6/1/1995 23  
Jones, J. Sherwood Jr.(SHERWOOD) 6/1/1968 50  
Parrott, V DeForrest III(DEFORREST) 6/1/1966 52  
Harris, Kevin W (KEVIN) 6/5/2001 17  
McDonald, David L (DAVID) 6/7/2011 7  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Winter, Larry E. (LARRY) Connie 2-Jun 45
Smith, Clark C. (CLARK) Rebecca 2-Jun 32
Jones, Miller T. (MILLER) Mary Lynn 5-Jun 14
Tripp, Larry E. (LARRY) Charlie 6-Jun 26
Richmond, John D. (JOHN) Agnes 7-Jun 10
Griffin, Ronald L (RON) Brenda 8-Jun 55
McKenzie, Sandra D (SANDY) Jimmy 8-Jun 33
Morehouse, Gordon C. (GORDON) Dianne 10-Jun 51
Pennington, David E. (DAVID) Pamela 11-Jun 41


Dalton's City Government Operations

An Update from the New City Administrator

by John Hutcheson

Club Past President and District 6910 Assistant District Governor Jason Parker was recently appointed Dalton’s City Administrator after serving many years as Chief of the Dalton Police Department. Acknowledging that his various positions are prompting some uncertainty about how he should be addressed, he indicated that “Jason” was perfectly appropriate.


Jason Parker

Throughout more than three decades of service to the city, Jason has always been aware of the community’s high expectations for its employees, and these have aligned with his own high expectations for himself. As City Administrator he is the city’s principal budget officer, working with other municipal employees and elected officials to secure the highest value at the lowest cost to the public’s resources. He said he is fortunate to be able to work with “ the best possible department heads, bar none,” so that he never needs to worry about day-to-day competency, and he is especially grateful for the work of Ms. Kim Witherow, whose twenty years of experience as assistant to three successive Administrators is an invaluable asset. Using slides, Jason introduced the city’s elected officials—the Mayor and four Council members—and he urged attendance at the regular City Council meetings on the first and third Mondays of each month as one of the best ways to gain insight into the operations of Dalton’s government.

Turning to a selection of the city’s ten administrative units, he briefly described the work and recent accomplishments of the Airport, Fire, Public Works, Police, and Recreation Departments. Dalton’s airport is one of 105 municipal airports across the state and one of 15 not funded by the local city or county but instead by user fees. Its facilities include a mile-long runway and equipment for instrument landings, and presently all hangars are occupied, with a waiting list of eighteen.

The Dalton Fire Department serves five districts and has a Class 2 IOS rating on a scale having Class 1 as the highest possible. During the past year its average response time was 7.5 minutes. The Department of Public Works maintains 188 miles of city streets, 115 traffic signals, and 90 miles of storm drainage as well as handling ongoing traffic studies and engineering projects, and it also manages hazardous and non-hazardous waste through regularly scheduled curbside pick-ups and, upon request, special pick-ups of large objects such as discarded appliances. The Dalton Police Department is nationally accredited and averages 45,000 calls per year, or 1,800 per square mile of city territory. In Safehome’s ranking, Dalton is 12th among the top 25 safest communities in Georgia.

The Department of Parks and Recreation oversees 734 acres of recreational areas, including 13 parks, 26 athletic fields, 18 tennis courts, three centers, and the Nob North Golf Course. It will operate the Burr Performing Arts Park, opened last month in the middle of downtown Dalton, and the new Haig Mill Park, the fifth of five new projects funded by a SPLOST, which is scheduled to open in August with facilities for hiking, boating, and fishing. At Heritage Point Park, much of the park’s 115 acres remain undeveloped, and studies are underway to determine using some of that land for soccer fields.

Dalton’s government is eager to deepen a sense of community pride by encouraging citizens to have “skin in the game” of the city’s physical attractiveness and beautification. During the past year, 3,500 code violations were addressed, 50 dangerous buildings were destroyed, and more than 3,000 bags of litter were picked up by the Public Works Department. Operation Gateway organizes grass-roots efforts to improve the appearance of the main entryways into the city, using an ethic of “turn up, clean up.” Currently the most pressing clean-up concern is along Tampico Way near the I-75/US 41 interchange, where owners of a derelict motel may soon face a deadline for repairs or demolition.

Jason reminded the Club that in these and other undertakings, it’s important to remember that young people are watching the actions of their elders, and that while it’s well to be optimistic, there is always much to do. Whether now or for the next generation of Dalton’s citizens, attitude matters and will insure that success builds on success. For the moment, projects with immediate impact include the award-winning extension of Fields Avenue which has significantly relieved traffic on Glenwood Avenue; the new traffic management pattern at the southern end of College Drive; the Burr and Haig Mill Parks; and the Western and Atlantic Depot, recently offered for sale with marketing advice and assistance from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

Looking forward, Jason noted that city expenditures have declined in recent years, which is good, but that this comes partly from job vacancies left open because of difficulties in finding and keeping qualified people. Dalton needs to tell its story better, and the City Government Academy meetings, scheduled to begin on Tuesdays in October, may help. Also, a citizen survey could provide input for developing strategies and connecting operations to them.

Announcements

President Kevin reviewed the program line-up for June, and President-Elect Greg Dent requested suggestions for programs during the upcoming year. Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett reminded members that a list of the Club’s Paul Harris Fellows is now available and announced that ten Club members have met the Paul Harris qualifications during the past year.



June 12th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Sanders, Drayton M II (DRAYTON) 13-Jun    
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) 14-Jun    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Little, Billie Little, William Norris Sr. 13-Jun  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
McClure, Douglas E (DOUGLAS) Storm 14-Jun 15
McDonald, David L (DAVID) Frances 15-Jun 49
Scott, William M. (WILL) Catherine 16-Jun 6
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) Donna 16-Jun 45


2018 Charlie Bowen 5th Grade Service Above Self Awards

by John Hutcheson

For the ninth year the Club held its annual Charlie Bowen 5th Grade Service Above Self Awards program for students who’ve been outstanding examples of Rotary’s motto during their elementary school years. Flawlessly organized by President-Nominee Amanda Reed, Rotarian Paul Alderman, and President Kevin, the event introduced Club members to a group of boys and girls whose accomplishments and commitment to the well-being of others are truly extraordinary for persons so young.

After a welcome and introduction from President Kevin, Amanda noted that it was “a great day to be a Rotarian” and explained the purpose and criteria for the awards. She thanked Paul Alderman, President Kevin, the teachers, principals, parents, and all who helped make the day’s recognitions possible, emphasizing that these students were being honored not for their academic or athletic accomplishments, however important or impressive these might be, but rather for their heart and dedication—often in ways previously receiving little or no recognition—to Rotary’s ideal of “making a difference” through service to others,.

Amanda introduced Dr. Judy Gilreath, Whitfield County Schools Superintendent, to congratulate the students from her system, who were then presented by Paul Alderman. These included:

Jizelle Adams, age 10, from Antioch Elementary; Allison Maldonado, age 11, from Beaverdale Elementary; Noely Hurtado, age 11, from Cedar Ridge Elementary; Kalynn Cameron, age 11, from Cohutta Elementary; Macie McClure, age 11, from Dawnville Elementary; Isaac Lopez, age 10, from Dug Gap Elementary; Delana Waters, age 11, from Eastside Elementary; Ava Brown, age 11, from New Hope Elementary; Deakon Edwards, age 10, from Pleasant Grove Elementary; Kylie Brown, age 10, from Tunnel Hill Elementary; Ansley Wheat, age 11, from Valley Point Elementary; Sury Bibian, age 11, from Varnell Elementary; and Kali Elrod, age 11, from Westside Elementary.


Whitfield County Schools winners

Dr. Tim Scott, Superintendent of Dalton Public Schools, congratualated the following students from that system, who were presented by Amanda Reed:

Maria Martin, age 10, from Blue Ridge Elementary; Taylor Valles, age 12, from Brookwood Elementary; Jabril Wahid, age 10, from City Park Elementary; Linda Isabel Burciaga, age 11, from Park Creek Elementary; Elyanna Quintero, age 11, from Roan Elementary; and Allee Phillips, age 10, from Westwood Elementary.


Dalton Public Schools winners

Kent Harrison, Headmaster of Christian Heritage School, congratulated his school’s honoree, Ava Grace Parkinson, age 11, who was presented by Amanda Reed.


Christian Heritage School winners

Each of the winning students received a copy of Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul by Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen, a framed certificate, and a bag of give-aways appropriate for fifth-graders from local merchants and businesses.

Amanda then read brief passages from entries in the “Laws of Life” essay competition submitted by Jizelle Adams of Antioch, Taylor Valles of Brookwood, Noely Hurtado of Cedar Ridge, Macie McClure of Dawnville, Isaac Lopez of Dug Gap, Ava Brown of New Hope, Deakon Edwards of Pleasant Grove, Kiley Brown of Tunnel Hill, Jabril of City Park, Isabel of Park Creek, Elyanna of Roan, and Allee of Westwood. She also read excerpts from the third-place essay, entitled “Standing Tall,” by Sury Bibian of Varnell, and the second-place entry, “Even the Little Things Make a Difference,” by Ansley Wheat of Valley Point. The program closed with Amanda’s reading in its entirety of the winning essay, “Life is Limitless,” written by Kalynn Cameron of Cohutta Elementary.



May 15th Birthdays and Anniversariies

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Creswell, Catrina Celeste (CELESTE) 15-May    
McFarland, Frances M. (BITSY) 17-May    
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) 19-May    
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) 21-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Blevins, David Blevins, Sheri H. 15-May  
Broadrick, Mary Ann Broadrick, Bruce L. 15-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) 5/19/1998 20  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) Avalee 17-May 4


Georgia's Confederate Monuments

by John Hutcheson

Kathryn Sellers introduced Gould B. Hagler, Jr, author of Georgia’s Confederate Monuments: In Honor of a Fallen Nation (Mercer University Press, 2014). Holding degrees from Wake Forest University and Georgia State University, for thirty years Gould lobbied for the Georgian Independent Insurance Agents, which he also served as CEO. A native of Augusta now living in the Atlanta area, he has long been active in many historical societies, including the Atlanta Civil War Round Table, which he served as president in 2011-2012, and the Sons of Confederate Veterans, in which he was commander of the John B. Gordon Camp 46 in 1996-1997.


Gould Hagler

Gould stated that monuments to the Confederate cause began to appear soon after the war ended and have continued to the present. In Georgia the first one was built in 1866, and the most recent, in Dahlonega, was placed in 2016. Using slides, Gould showed that monument designers employed a variety of architectural forms, with the most frequent being a soldier’s statue atop a column. Other designs included obelisks, which are common in cemeteries, or simple memorial stones, especially in smaller communities with limited resources. Occasionally one finds arches, and sometimes there are special symbolic sculptures, such as the wounded lion in Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery (modeled on Switzerland’s “Lion of Lucerne” monument to Swiss Guards massacred by French revolutionaries in 1792), or emblems of fraternal organizations commemorating members lost in the war. There are a few instances of fountains or other water features and many examples of plaques or tablets in courthouses or other public places, often giving the names of the dead from the local area. At least one Confederate memorial stained glass window exists, at Rhodes Hall in Atlanta, and two monuments honor Union as well as Confederate dead. Structures erected more recently often take the form of walls listing the dead from other conflicts, such as the World Wars, as well as from the Civil War.

Turning to their purposes, Gould asked what these monuments say to us. In the first place, they praised the dedication and bravery of the Confederacy’s troops, particularly the common soldiers, who were often barely beyond boyhood. Secondly, they were intended to defend the Southern cause, explaining not only why the soldiers fought but also why civilians endured the hardships of war with an invading force. Refusing to identify Confederates as rebels, they emphasized the right of local self-government set forth in the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and asserted the idea that since the states made the union, rather than the union making the states, any state retained the right to secede from the Union. Thirdly, they mourned the dead—around 277,000, excluding civilian casualties—and finally they often gave thanks for the return of peace. In this light, the recent vandalizing of Atlanta’s monument to peace and reconciliation in Piedmont Park is particularly deplorable.

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin reviewed the program line-up for May and reminded members that there will be no lunchtime meeting on May 8 because of the Friends of Rotary event from 6:00-8:00 that evening at 229 North Hamilton and no meeting at all on May 29 because of the Dalton Country Club’s closure that day. Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett announced that a list of the Club’s Paul Harris Fellows is now available. Rotarian Rob Bradham reminded members of the Pitch Dalton competition scheduled for May 15 at Stage 123. Rotarian Zach Taylor noted that today’s meeting will be the last for Linnea Neman and Clare Ballentine, this year’s GRSP students.

President Kevin awarded Alex Brown his Blue Badge, and Past President John Richmond introduced Rotarians Dixie Kinard, Kathryn Sellers, and Roy Johnson as the Club’s newest Will Watt Fellows in recognition of their contributions to the Georgia Rotary Student Program.


Alex Brown, Dixie Kinard, Kathryn Sellers, Roy Johnson



May 8th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Manly, William Judson Jr. (JUDSON) 8-May    
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) 9-May    
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) 12-May    
Mixer, Mark S (MARK) 13-May    
Adamson, Anna Y (ANNA) 14-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sherwood, Jean Jones, J. Sherwood Jr. 9-May  
Mixer, Mark Mixer, Kimberly J 13-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Adamson, Anna Y (ANNA) 5/9/2017 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Anderson, Michael S (MICHAEL) Adina 14-May 13


My GRSP Year: A Report From Linnea Neman

by John Hutcheson


Linnea Neman

Zach Taylor introduced Linnea Neman, the Club’s GRSP student for 2017-2018, emphasizing what a delight it has been to have her live with his family and to get to know her and other GRSP students.

Linnea remarked on how quickly the time has flown since her arrival in Georgia on August 1, 2017. Although the year has been like a roller coaster ride, it has definitely been one of the best years of her life. After enrolling at Dalton State, her first month was a time of adaptation to a different academic setting, new living arrangements, and American culture generally. She took twelve credit hours each semester and roomed with Clare Ballentine, a GRSP student from England sponsored by the Carpet City Rotary Club. At the outset she didn’t know what to expect, but she found DSC to be enjoyable, its small classes and relatively small size overall affording her many chances to meet others and to live in an environment she compared to that of living in a hotel. She was able to take courses not available at home, especially American government at the national, state, and local levels, in addition to English and Spanish courses which enriched her knowledge and competence in those languages.

Through the auspices of the GRSP she traveled widely around Georgia, enjoying monthly trips usually scheduled over weekends and hosted by local Rotary clubs. In addition to Atlanta, she also visited Athens, Savannah, Cumberland Island, and much of South Georgia. Outside the state, she traveled to Asheville and Biltmore, Huntsville, Nashville, New Orleans, Auburn, and Disney World. When her family came from Sweden, she went to Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and San Diego, and she was also able to go to Washington, D.C. and New York City.

As for Dalton, she will remember it as a wonderful place, where she particularly enjoyed hiking in the beautiful scenery and meeting new people. During her year here she has gained a new degree of independence by being away from her family for so long, and she now feels more self-sufficient than she ever has. Her English has improved greatly (one New Yorker even said she had a Southern accent!), and she has learned much about the U.S. while also teaching others about Sweden (which led her to learn new things about her own country as well). She does remain perplexed about some American characteristics, such as drive-through facilities of all kinds, the size of parking lots, flags flying everywhere, huge portions in restaurants, and many other commonplaces virtually unknown in Europe.

In closing, Linnea thanked the Club for all its support and described the GRSP as “amazing,” fulfilling its purpose far more warmly and informatively than conventional foreign exchange programs do. She noted that this year’s GRSP class has expressed its appreciation by creating an illustrated booklet about their time in Georgia which is now available online. Responding to a question about her future plans, she said that after returning to Sweden she will probably take a year off before going to college, using the time to travel and process her own Georgia experiences before enrolling at the Copenhagen Business School.

Announcements

President Kevin reviewed the program line-up for May and reminded members that there will be no lunchtime meeting on May 8 because of the Friends of Rotary event that evening and no meeting at all on May 29 because of the Dalton Country Club’s closure that day. He then called on Past President Bill Bowen, who in turn introduced Rotarian Mike Maret as the Club’s newest Will Watt Fellow in recognition of Mike’s contributions to the Georgia Rotary Student Program. Will Watt Fellows have given a minimum of $1,000 to the GRSP, whose endowment fund now totals around $9,000,000, enabling a grant of about $5,000 per year to each GRSP student.


Bill Bowen and Mike Meret

President Kevin returned to the podium to read a letter from Joanie Taylor extending her thanks for the support she received this year from the Club, from her neighbors in the Windermere subdivision, and from other members of the GRSP Dalton host family. She was especially grateful to her husband, Rotarian Zach Taylor, who fulfilled several GRSP responsibilities on his own when circumstances limited or prevented Joanie’s presence.



May 1st Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) 1-May    
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) 3-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Holmes, Cathy Didier, John M. 1-May  
Kinard, Dixie Kinard, Robert W 1-May  
Jones, Patrick Jones, Kelly McDonald 3-May  
Winter, Connie Winter, Larry E. 4-May  
Bronson, Erica Bronson, William III 4-May  
Bailey, Dell Bailey, Philip Bates 4-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) 5/1/1983 35  
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) 5/1/1980 38  
Ryman, Milton J. Jr.(MILTON) 5/1/1989 29  
Williams, Roger (ROGER) 5/1/1978 40  
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) 5/1/1984 34  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Parker, Hoyt Jason (JASON) April 2-May 26
Williams, Roger (ROGER) Joann 5-May 62
Pangle, William T (TODD) Belinda 6-May 23
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) Laura 7-May 24


Visit From RI's Immediate Past President

by John Hutcheson


John Germ

President Kevin introduced John Germ of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, who served in 2016-2017 as President of Rotary International, and Debbie Scott, John’s daughter-in-law who facilitated John’s visit to Dalton.

Long an extraordinary leader in Chattanooga’s business and civic affairs, John graduated from the University of Tennessee and is now the president and chief executive officer of Campbell & Associates, Inc., consulting engineers. He joined Rotary in 1976 and served as President of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga in 1993-1994, as District 6780 Governor in 1996-1997, and as International Assembly Training Leader in 2000-2001. John served on the RI Board of Directors for 2003-2005 and was Vice President in 2004-2005. He has been a member of the International Assembly Committee and Chairman of the Council on Legislation, and Vice Chair - Rotary Centers Major Gift Initiative. He was Aide to President Wilf Wilkinson and Vice Chairman of the International Convention in 2012. In 2013, the White House honored John as one of twelve Rotary International members who are "Champions of Change". In the Chattanooga community, he has served as president of the Chamber of Commerce, of Junior Achievement, and of the Boy Scouts, and he was campaign chairman of United Way. He has also been president of the Tennessee Jaycees and is a recipient of the Boy Scouts of America Silver Beaver Award. John and his wife Judy are Major Donors to the Rotary Foundation, of which John has just been named a Trustee.

After noting that the RI Presidency is really a three-year process, entailing service as Presidential Nominee and President-Elect as well as the Presidential year itself, John focused his remarks on some of the more memorable moments from his time as RI President, during which he visited 35 states in the U.S. and 33 other countries. His term saw him spend no more than twenty days of it at RI headquarters in Evanston, Indiana, and equally few days at his home in Chattanooga. Over the years his service to Rotary has caused him to log two million miles on Delta Airlines alone, but despite his Rotary obligations, he has always insisted on being at home with his family for every Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday.

When a District Governor asked John to attend his installation, he declined because of concern that a multitude of other DG’s would expect him to be present at their installations as well, leaving him little time for anything else. After reflection, however, he established a policy whereby he would attend if the new governor demonstrated the ideals of Rotary by organizing and carrying out a project to benefit his or her community. One example of what resulted was in Jamaica, where 29 districts combined to provide an eye care clinic and also a school for abused girls. In Guatemala, Rotarians provided an X-ray machine to an extremely remote village located eight hours from the nearest hospital and then did the same thing for sixteen other villages. In Nigeria, Rotary’s work was crucial to the elimination of polio, as indeed it has been in the rest of the world; today there are only eight documented cases—seven in Afghanistan and one in Pakistan. John pointed out that polio surveillance continues in 72 countries, at a cost of $400,000 per year, and that the total cost of the worldwide eradication effort so far has reached $900,000,000. The Rotary Foundation has been the driving force behind this achievement, and John gave a brief review of the Foundation’s history since its establishment in 1917.with an initial contribution of $26.50. Over the following century it spent more than three billion dollars on projects to improve the human condition.

One of John’s most vivid memories from his Presidential year was of a visit to a Mexican bakery operated by individuals in various stages of rehabilitation from drug addictions, an enterprise which helped 200 persons a year. This was a particularly striking example of the wonderful things Rotary can accomplish. Yet for all that, Rotary’s worldwide membership has been stable for many years at around 1.2 million. The obvious question is why this is true, and the obvious need is to add members, especially from younger segments of the population. John closed with an appeal for vigorous recruitment of new members, inspired by a vision of what this could mean for Dalton and for the world.

Announcements

President Kevin thanked all those who worked to make last week’s Earl Lusk Golf Tournament a success. He also reminded members to use the buckets on the tables for contributions to the Alzheimer’s Research Trust, and he appealed for contributions to the gift bags for the 5th Grade students who will be recognized next month. Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett reported that 74, or about 60%, of the Club’s members are now Paul Harris Fellows, but our goal remains 100%, and he again noted that members holding extra points can share them with others who are close to achieving the thousand-point minimum. Finally, Rotarian Rob Bradham urged members to attend the kickoff on April 23 at Stage 123 for the downtown planning component of the BELIEVE Dalton program.



2018 Rotary Golf Tournament

The annual Earl Lusk Golf Tournament was held on April 10th.



The tournament is the Club’s only fund-raising event, with the proceeds used to underwrite scholarships awarded each year to outstanding area high school graduates. A few payments are still yet to be received for this year's tournament, but gross revenue is expected to be about $21,000. For the 4-person select shot tournament, a total of 55 players competed on 14 teams, with the golfers split into two flights based on scoring ability. The first place winners for each flight received $600 in gift certificates to the DGCC Pro Shop. The first place winner for Flight #1 was the Atlantic Capital team with a score of 53. For Flight #2, the winner was the Textile Rubber team with a score of 61. The tournament offered hole-in-one prizes for a 2018 Kia Sorento from Pye Kia on Hole #9; and a 2018 ATV from Kirk’s Cycle on Hole #14.

Prior to tee-off time, Club members and tournament participants enjoyed the traditional pre-tournament lunch of burgers and hot dogs.



April 24th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) 27-Apr    
Dent, Gregory J (GREG) 27-Apr    
Patterson, Frank W Jr. (FRANK) 29-Apr    
Bowen, William C. III (BILL) 29-Apr    
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) 29-Apr    
Smith, Clark C. (CLARK) 30-Apr    
Scott, William M. (WILL) 30-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
No Partner birthdays this period.  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Wright, William B. Jr.(WILLIAM) 4/24/2012 6  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Kelehear, Leon S. (SPARKY) Pat 25-Apr 32
Adcock, Don W. (DON) Diane 28-Apr 49
Tatum, Laurice A. (LAURICE) Sharon 29-Apr 46


April 17th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Partain, Jack (JACK) 18-Apr    
Messick, Amy R (AMY) 21-Apr    
Goodroe, Robert S. (ROBERT) 23-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Bledsoe, Ginny Bledsoe, Jonathan L. 21-Apr  
Brantley, Tray Brantley, Valerie K 22-Apr  
Hoskins, Carole Hoskins, Douglas H. 23-Apr  
Bestawros, Hilda Bestawros, Onsy A 23-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Myers, Jeffrey Donald (JEFFREY) 4/19/2005 13  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) Bob 19-Apr 49
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) Dixie 19-Apr 49


Dalton State College Golf

by John Hutcheson

President Kevin introduced Ben Rickett, Director of Dalton State College’s golf program and head coach for the men’s team.
A native of Surrey, England, Ben is a former top 100 in the world as an amateur. He made match play at the 2006 and 2009 British Amateur as well as several English Amateurs, reaching the round of 16 in 2006.

Ben came to Dalton State in 2013 from his alma mater, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. As both a coach and student-athlete, he helped build the Mocs’ program into a national power, becoming a four-year letter-winner for the Mocs by playing 118 rounds in his four seasons with a 73.66 stroke average. As a senior, Ben posted a team-best four top-ten finishes and eight top-twenty finishes. He earned PING All-East Region honors along with being named an All-Southern Conference performer. His best finish was a tie for second at the Aldila Scenic City Invitational, shooting a 205 (-11). Ben carded 16 rounds in the 60s for his career and 39 rounds of par or better. His Mocs teams were a fixture in the NCAA division I top 25 throughout his playing career, achieving a #1 ranking in 2008. In May 2010, he was named a full-time assistant with the men's golf program at UTC where he worked in all aspects of the program including recruiting, scheduling, practice and on-course coaching. He had previously served a year as a student-assistant while finishing his degree in psychology.


Ben Rickett

Ben caddied for 2012 U.S. Amateur Champion, Steven Fox, and helped Fox overcome a late deficit to win the title. This victory carried with it a prestigious invitation to compete in the 2013 Masters where Ben was again on the bag for Steven.

Married to a Daltonian and living in the Varnell area, Ben has long known that Dalton—either the College or the community—do not like losing, and his principal aspiration is to build and sustain an appropriately winning program at Dalton State. He noted that many of his recruits are pleasantly surprised when they visit Dalton, gaining strongly positive impressions of the natural and social environments, the quality of the local golf courses, and most importantly, the intensity of the community’s commitment to providing them with opportunities to excel.

Ben bragged on many of his players, a large number of whom have won awards and championships in both men’s and women’s competitions. The DSC golf program is the only one in the country to have top-three rankings in both the men’s and women’s divisions of the NAIA, and last year the men finished 4th in the national competition. Next week DSC will host the Roadrunner Classic, in which twelve NAIA championship teams will compete at The Farm and learn what Dalton has to offer. None of this would be possible without the immense community support the program enjoys.

In the course of his presentation Ben told many amusing stories about his experiences in professional golf. He hesitated to predict the outcome of the Masters, but he admitted his partiality for Tiger Woods, whom he described as his “idol” as a golfer.

Announcements

President-Elect Greg Dent announced that a Family & Friends of Rotary social event will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 8, at Gather 229 on North Hamilton Street and that the Club will not hold a noon meeting that day. He also informed the Club of the nomination of Amanda Reed, Chief Operating Officer of the Health One Alliance, to be President-Elect for 2018-2019 and President in 2019-2020, which members unanimously approved by acclamation.

President Kevin urged members to use the buckets on the tables for contributions to the Alzheimer’s Research Trust, and he mentioned several upcoming events, including the Golf Tournament on April 10 (for which Club Administration Chair Chris Cooke noted that the sponsorship goal has almost been reached), a visit on April 17 from RI Past President John Germ of the Chattanooga Rotary Club, and presentations by this year’s GRSP students on April 24. Finally, Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett stated that while 71 of the Club’s members are now Paul Harris Fellows, our goal remains 100%, and he briefly outlined how members holding extra points can share them with others who are close to achieving the thousand-point minimum.



 

April 10th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) 11-Apr    
McClurg, Charles R. (RONNIE) 11-Apr    
Sellers, Kathryn Oehler (KATHRYN) 11-Apr    
Harris, Kevin W (KEVIN) 16-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Abernathy, Virginia Abernathy, Sid G. 13-Apr  
Dent, Marybeth Dent, Gregory J 16-Apr  
Srivastava, Vinai Srivastava, Archana 16-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Carter, Teresa (TERESA) Glen 15-Apr 1
Stewart, Robert T (ROBERT) Celeste 15-Apr 30


April 3rd Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Anderson, Michael S (MICHAEL) 4-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
McDonald, Frances McDonald, David L 5-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Messick, Amy R (AMY) 4/4/2017 1  
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) 4/9/2013 5  
Carter, Teresa (TERESA) 4/9/2013 5  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) Sandra 7-Apr 35
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) Cindy 8-Apr 18


Rome Braves

One of the annual rites of spring is the return of baseball to green fields around the country. The Atlanta Braves started their season last week with a winning series against the Philadelphia Phillies. Not to be outdone, their younger brothers in the team's farm system are getting ready to start their own season in Rome. Last week, Rome Braves team representatives Jim Jones and Jeff Fletcher visted our club to discuss the team's chances this year and also discuss some of the future Atlanta stars they expect to be playing in Rome this spring. They also discussed different ticket packages and options that are available for baseball fans who want to come see the future of the Braves. Information about the team and the schedule can be found online at www.romebraves.com. 

Golf Tournament Reminder

The Rotary Golf Tournament is coming up on April 10th. Anyone interested in donating promotional items for goodie bags should contact Chris Cooke. 

A Day To Honor Our Own

by John Hutcheson

President Kevin opened the meeting by noting that buckets have been placed on each table to collect funds for the Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust (CART), and he asked members for generous contributions from their pocket change. Past President Jason Parker appealed for more participation from sponsors and players in the Club’s Golf Tournament on April 10, and he also asked for items to fill the party bags given to all players.

Membership Chair Cherri Robertson presided over the induction of four new Rotarians: Darby Gooding, sponsored by the Club; Brian Croft, sponsored by Shell Underwood; Richie Watson, sponsored by Bob Caperton; and Kimberly Mixer, sponsored by Mark Mixer.


Our newest Rotarians

Vocational Service Chair Chris Cooke announced the Club’s nominees for two of District 6910’s greatest honors, the W. Lee Arrendale Vocational Excellence Award and the Robert S. Stubbs II Guardian of Ethics Award. The selection was made by a committee made up of Chris, President Kevin Brunson, Past President Bruce Satterfield, President-Elect Greg Dent, and Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett.

The Arrendale Award recognizes Lee Arrendale, a Rotarian from Habersham County who was a recognized leader in the Georgia poultry industry and served his state as Chairman of the Georgia Board of Corrections. Guidelines for the award in his name require the nominee to show excellence in his or her vocation, achievements in the community, and academic excellence.

For the 2018-2019 Arrendale Vocational Excellence Award the Rotary Club of Dalton nominates Past President David Aft.


David Aft

David holds his undergraduate degree in Civic Work and Master’s in Social Work from Florida State University and moved to Dalton in 1996 to become president of the local United Way. He and his wife, Pauline, have two grown children, both of whom were Rotary Scholars and are graduates of the University of Georgia.

After serving at the United Way, David succeeded another Rotarian, Gordon Morehouse, as president of the Northwest Georgia Community Foundation, a position he continues to hold today. With locations in Dalton, Calhoun, and Cartersville, the Foundation’s mission is to promote and facilitate charitable giving through the management of funds and distribution of grants, and over the years it has managed 189 funds for individuals, families, and non-profit organizations, while distributing more than $44,000,000 in grants for the community. One of David’s most noteworthy achievements was to facilitate the move of the Chattanooga Food Bank into the Dalton area, thus allowing more access to food for struggling members of our population. More recently, he has spearheaded the creation of Burr Park, currently under construction and soon to become a focal point in central Dalton for entertainment events and easy access to downtown restaurants and other attractions.

As well as being an extremely active member of the Rotary Club of Dalton, where he was president in 2014-2015, David has served on numerous local boards and committees, and in 2016 he assumed a leadership role in BELIEVE Greater Dalton, a new initiative by the Dalton Chamber of Commerce. Acting as one of the project’s six sub-committee chairs, David is working to establish downtown Dalton as a destination district, even making a personal commitment by opening his own downtown business, Dave and Pauli’s Art Emporium. Greg Dent describes David as “a nonprofit professional that truly understands his role in the community. . . . When I think of community involvement, partnership, teamwork, facilitation, compassion for the community, and a genuine concern to make Dalton better every day, the first person that comes to mind is David Aft.”

The Stubbs Guardian of Ethics Award, named for Robert (Bob) Stubbs II, a member of the Rotary Club of Canton, honors a person who has been a Rotarian for at least three years and has made outstanding contributions in his or her vocation while also strengthening and fostering the development of ethical practices by actions, writing, policies, and public pronouncements. Ethics has many definitions, but Chris’s favorite comes from the Josephson Institute of Ethics: “Ethics is about how we meet the challenge of doing the right thing when that will cost more than we want to pay.”

This year’s nominee for the Stubbs Award from the Rotary Club of Dalton is Dr. John Richmond.


Dr. John Richmond

A graduate of West Virginia University, John completed medical school in 1974 and served his internship in Denver, Colorado, before joining the U.S. Navy as a flight surgeon and being assigned to the USS Nimitz on a Defense Cruise Mission in the Mediterranean. Following his discharge, he continued his education at the University of Virginia, specializing in nephrology, and after a brief return to his hometown of Beckley, West Virginia, he settled in Dalton in 1984, opening a practice in nephrology and hypertension. Although now semi-retired, he still works in his former office part-time and volunteers as needed at Mednow, a local clinic.

John’s commitment to the citizens of the community is unmatched. He has served as vice president of the Dalton Education Foundation, as a committee member of the Northwest Georgia Healthcare Partnership, and as Committee Chairman of Credentialing for the Health One Alliance. He has been President of the Medical Staff of Hamilton Medical Center, a member of its Board of Directors, and President of the Whitfield-Murray Medical Society. In 1993 he was the first physician to be selected as the Chamber’s Professional of the Year. On a wider scale, John served as President of the Georgia Nephrology Society, and he has won numerous awards in his field across the Southeast and throughout the United States.

John joined Rotary in June, 1985, and quickly became active, participating on the Student Scholarship Committee and in the Rotary International Foundation. He is a four-time Paul Harris Fellow and was the Club’s president in 2010-2011. In recent years the majority of his Rotary work has been devoted to GRSP, in which he has been recognized as a Kendall Wiessenger Fellow. A tireless advocate foe GRSP, he is a District 6910 Trustee for the program and the GRSP Chair for the Planning Committee for the 2019 District Conference.

In 2013 John received the W. Lee Arrendale Award for Vocational Excellence, and he continues to be an advocate for Rotary in all his daily actions.



March 27th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) 27-Mar    
Schneller, April D (APRIL) 1-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Martin, Sandy Martin, Richard G. 1-Apr  
Hogshead, Carolyn Hogshead, Frank M. 2-Apr  
Williams, Joann Williams, Roger 2-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) 3/30/2010 8  
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) 3/30/2010 8  
Partain, Jack (JACK) 4/1/1989 29  
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) 4/1/2008 10  
Temples, Coy H (COY) 4/1/1978 40  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


News From The Special Olympics

By John Hutcheson

Club Administration Chair Chris Cooke stated that the recent Law Enforcement Polar Plunge raised $150,000 for the Special Olympics. On another subject, he also thanked everyone who helped in the response to the shooting incident at Dalton High School.

Chris introduced Lisa Hughey, who has been Coordinator of the Special Olympics for Whitfield County for the last seventeen years. Lisa said that there are 5.6 million Special Olympians worldwide, with 460 in Dalton and Whitfield County. In the near future, the major fund-raising event will be a track and field meet to be held on April 20 at Southeast Whitfield High School.
Lisa then introduced her son Tyler, who warmly thanked the Club for the opportunity to speak about what Special Olympics has meant to him.


Tyler Hughey

He mentioned that the program was founded in 1958 by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy. Tyler has been involved with it for fifteen years in bowling, tennis (his favorite sport), as well as other activities such as skiing and sailing. For him Special Olympics is very much a family affair, as his sister, both parents, and one of his grandfathers all take part in its operations. Competing with them and with new friends he’s been able to make, he’s come to regard the program itself as a second family, and through it he’s traveled to many places around the U.S. he probably would not have visited otherwise. He particularly enjoys taking part in unified sports, in which Special Olympians and regular athletes compete together.

Tyler emphasized that Special Olympics is more than just sports—it can be a life-changing project for communities as well as for individuals. It is vigorously working to eliminate one “r-word”—“retarded”—as a personal adjective and replace it with another—“respected.” It has also launched a vision-improvement initiative which has so far given away 110,000 pairs of glasses. Tyler concluded by noting that about fifty delegates from Georgia will attend (although not compete in) the Special Olympics in Seattle in July.

Announcements

Past President Bruce Satterfield urged everyone to support the track meet on March 10, adding that volunteers were still needed and that if weather conditions warrant cancellation, information will be sent by email the night before the meet. [Late News: Early in the afternoon of March 9, the meet was cancelled due to forecasts of cold rain.]

Past President Jason Parker reminded members about the golf tournament on April 10; funds raised will provide scholarships for sixteen to twenty students. There will also be a raffle for which the drawing will be on April 3, with half the proceeds going to the winner and half to the scholarship fund. President Kevin noted that the Club’s meeting on March 13 will be an R & R, with no formal program.

On behalf of the GRSP, Past President John Richmond presented President Kevin and Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead with a check for $1,860 in recognition of the Club’s participation in GRSP at an average rate of at least $50 per member.


GRSP Check Presentation



March 20th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Richmond, John D. (JOHN) 20-Mar    
Brantley, Valerie K (VAL) 21-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Pangle, Belinda Pangle, William T 24-Mar  
Gazaway, Johnnie Gazaway, Kristie 24-Mar  
Stewart, Celeste Stewart, Robert T 25-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) 3/26/2013 5  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) Patrick 25-Mar 23


March 13th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
No birthdays this period.  
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Harris, Lezlie Harris, Kevin W 13-Mar  
Temples, Noel Temples, Coy H 16-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Anderson, Michael S (MICHAEL) 3/14/2017 1  
Conway, Deborah R (DEBORAH) 3/15/2016 2  
Tatum, Laurice A. (LAURICE) 3/15/2016 2  
Farrow, Stephen B (STEVE) 3/15/2016 2  
Townsend, Patrick J. (PAT) 3/15/2016 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) Shaun 19-Mar 24


A Look At The Lookouts

by John Hutcheson

President Kevin introduced Rich Mozingo, President and General Manager of the Chattanooga Lookouts. Rich holds a marketing degree from James Madison University and is now beginning his 25th year in professional baseball. In January 1993 he joined the Texas Rangers organization before taking a job with the Chattanooga Lookouts the following November as Director of Group Sales, and by 1999 he had risen to the position of General Manager for the Lookouts. In 2002 he moved to Columbia, South Carolina to become President and General Manager of the Capital City Bombers. After three years he moved that team and the franchise to Greenville, South Carolina, and in 2006 he went to Lakewood, New Jersey to work with the Lakewood BlueClaws, a Single-A affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies. In 2011 he returned to Chattanooga as President and General Manager of the Lookouts.


Rich Mozingo


After introducing Bob Bethel, a Daltonian who is one of the owners of the Lookouts franchise, Rich told a couple of amusing anecdotes about Tommy Lasorda, the legendary General Manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, with whom the Lookouts were affiliated from 2009 to 2014. During a visit to Chattanooga, Lasorda regularly ate breakfast at the Blue Plate diner on Chestnut Street, where he would tell stories and hold court with visitors until lunchtime. Having a habit of ignoring his bill, eventually he acquired the nickname “Crime,” because, like crime, he didn’t pay. On one occasion he proceeded from the Blue Plate to the ballpark and berated a group of players at length for idling in the club house rather than practicing on the field, only to be told he was in the wrong room.

In 2017 the Lookouts seemed bound for a mediocre season—the roster was weak, there was a new General Manager, and the players seemed unimpressive when compared to those of the 2015 championship season. Nevertheless, the team won 91 of 141 games and shared the league championship with the Pensacola Blue Wahoos. For 2018 the results remain to be seen, but as always, the franchise’s main object is for its patrons to have fun at the ballpark, regardless of the outcome of the games, which really can’t be controlled.

In 2017 a new high-definition video board was installed at AT&T Field, showing sponsored displays but no commercials. The team’s owners, the Hardball Capital Group, has developed a new array of ticketing plans, based on 7-, 14-, and 21-game packages. With picnic areas and facilities for group outings, the ballpark is a great place for parties, celebrations, and fund-raising functions—tickets bought for $3.00 may be resold for $5.00 for the benefit of charitable agencies which can then showcase themselves at games. The owners are eager for community involvement and have already participated in walks to benefit organizations fighting heart disease and hydrocephalus.

Upcoming events include Fun Fest on March 17, with tours of the ballpark and sales on Lookouts merchandise, and the 2018 Opening Day on April 5. This year the Lookouts will play 70 home games, but much work is done in the off-season as well, for the year has three components: planning, marketing, and playing. There will be eight fireworks shows, many giveaways of Lookouts gear, and a host of special observances such as Hispanic Heritage Night, Star Wars Night, Faith and Family Night, Used Car Night, College Football Night, and Super Hero Night (when team staff members and fans dress up as super heroes—this has sold out for the past two years). All of these require careful planning and effective marketing apart from the work involved with assembling, training, and fielding a worthwhile baseball team.

Responding to a question about conversations now underway regarding construction of a new, multi-use stadium in a redeveloped South Broad District, Rich said that the Lookouts are interested and are exploring partnership possibilities, but he noted that it would be viable only as the centerpiece of a larger project that includes office, commercial, and even residential spaces.

Announcements

President Kevin summarized upcoming programs for the next few weeks and said that a New Member Orientation would be led by Mike Maret. Past Presidents Bruce Satterfield and Jason Parker reminded members about the track meet on March 10 and the Golf Tournament in April, respectively.



March 6th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Henson, Paul E. Jr. (PAUL) 10-Mar    
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) 12-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Griffin, Candy Griffin, Joseph Bryan 12-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Weaver, William B (BILL) Virginia 12-Mar 52


March 6th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Henson, Paul E. Jr. (PAUL) 10-Mar    
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) 12-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Griffin, Candy Griffin, Joseph Bryan 12-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Weaver, William B (BILL) Virginia 12-Mar 52


The Dalton Innovation Accelerator

by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Pat Chute introduced Dr. Marilyn Helms, Dean of the C. Lamar and Ann Wright School of Business and Sesquicentennial Chair and Professor of Supply Chain Management at Dalton State College. With undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Memphis, Dr. Helms previously taught at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and with Kennesaw State University’s program on the Dalton State campus. She is internationally recognized in her field, has won numerous awards for her teaching in the U.S. and abroad, and has published and spoken in a wide range of academic and general public settings. A member of the Dalton State faculty since 2000, she is deeply involved in the local community through Junior Achievement and the Creative Arts Guild, and she was the leading fundraiser and winner of the 2016 Dancing Stars of North Georgia Competition to benefit Alzheimer’s research.


Marilyn Helms

Dr. Helms began by pointing out Dalton’s rich history of innovation in business and manufacturing, which it has an equally impressive record of operationalizing. The Dalton Innovation Accelerator (DIA), one of about 200 such projects across the country, has been organized to serve as a vehicle for pairing innovators with the community’s seasoned entrepreneurs by enabling them to compete for short-term mentorship, start-up space, and seed capital. Its long-term goals are to support new entrepreneurship in immediately effective ways and to encourage entrepreneurs to remain in the Dalton-Whitfield area.

DIA’s origins lie in the summer of 2017. In July, Investure IT, a Dalton-based technology company serving companies and governments across the Southeast, moved into the Landmark Building and approached the building’s owners, Barrett Properties, to discuss the potential for a start-up competition and business incubator/accelerator similar to those it had promoted elsewhere. This was formalized in August, and in September an Advisory Panel of representatives from Advanced Insurance Strategies, Barrett Properties, Believe Greater Dalton, the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce, Luna Design, the Minor Firm, the Morehouse Group, and Dalton State formed and began holding bi-weekly meetings. Early in 2018 a competition called PitchDIA was launched, inviting applicants to participate in a competition modeled on ABC television’s Shark Tank reality show. Applications are due March 1, 2018, selected competitors will be announced on March 30, and the pitch event is scheduled for May 15. The first-place winner will receive a cash award of $5,000, over 500 sq. ft. of office space in the Landmark Building (where 1,800 sq. ft. have been set aside for DIA projects) rent-free for the first six months, staffing, and technology, legal, accounting, banking, branding, marketing, and mentoring services worth as much as $15,000. Second-place will win $500 in cash, over 250 sq. ft. of space, and a shorter list of services, while the third-place winner will receive $500 and technical, legal, and mentoring services.

Dr. Helms closed by noting that applications thus far have been encouraging, ranging from high- to low-tech. She is personally gratified by the interest shown by students at DSC, and she encouraged Rotarians to get involved with DIA and take advantage of what it will bring to the community.

Announcements

President Kevin opened the meeting by reading a letter from Devon Brooks, Executive Director of the Humane Society of Northwest Georgia, expressing deep gratitude for the Club’s financial assistance to the Society’s campaign to raise funds for construction of a new shelter facility.

A Rotary Minute with April Schneller

April Schneller, Director of Advancement at Christian Heritage School, is originally from Nashville but has lived in Dalton (which she considers a truly unique place) for 22 years. The youngest of seven children, her birth at dawn on April 1 determined her name. She is a graduate of Austen Peay State University, where she played volleyball and was also active in cycling and triathlon. She has been married to Doug for 24 years and has sixteen-year-old twin girls. In recent years she has returned to her farm upbringing—she and her family raise Angus cattle and now have a herd of about fifty head. This summer she will go on a medical mission trip to a destination yet to be decided.


April Schneller



February 27th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Chute, Patricia M (PAT) 28-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Brooker, Janet Brooker, Robert H. 27-Feb  
Jones, Danielle Jones, J Sherwood III 27-Feb  
Ward, Allen Ward, Barbara K. 27-Feb  
Johnson, Pat Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr. 1-Mar  
Wright, Joanne Wright, Thomas L 3-Mar  
Bowen, Ann Bowen, William C. III 5-Mar  
Pierce, Lamar Pierce, Sara C. 5-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Griffin, Ronald L (RON) 3/1/1988 30  
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) 3/1/1976 42  
Bowen, William C. III(BILL) 3/1/1975 43  
Manly, William Judson Jr.(JUDSON) 3/1/1964 54  
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) 3/1/1975 43  
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) 3/1/1994 24  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) Bobby 27-Feb 19


Rethinking Entrepreneurship For Small Business

by John Hutcheson

Community Service Chair Amy Messick introduced Rotarian Alex Brown, who shared his experience as a small business entrepreneur in diverse locations, ranging from large cities such as Seattle and Atlanta to smaller communities such as Dalton. A native of Colorado, Alex holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from the University of Colorado and a master’s from Auburn University, and he has also attended Northwestern University.


Alex Brown

From his experiences and observations, Alex discerns three major trends in current entrepreneurship: (1) the empowerment of women, (2) the emergence of the gig- (i.e. digital) economy, and (3) the increasing drive to improve services. He noted that 43% of employees will soon effectively be independent contractors, able to work remotely from their headquarters. They can become “digital nomads,” living anywhere they may find congenial and have appropriate connectivity. Moreover, 47% of privately held firms are now led by female majorities among executives and directors. This applies as well to the professions; for instance, the majority of medical students is now composed of females. Significantly, 25% of all U.S. households are led by single breadwinners, of whom one-third, or 8%-9% of the total, are women—a huge potential market.

Alex gave several examples of small businesses involving him and his family which have experienced rapid, large-scale growth by recognizing and exploiting the changing nature of the marketplace. Preferhired, based in Tampa, Florida, is a crowd-sourced, referral-based platform providing online access for candidates and prospective employers to form ideal matches; since its establishment in January 2017 it has grown from one to 16,000 users. Draw My Hunt, headquartered in southwestern Colorado and an outgrowth of Alex’s deep love for his native state and its outdoors recreation, is an interactive portfolio management solution for simplifying species tag applications, centralizing license acquisitions, and organizing big game hunting opportunities. A similar company called Expedition Outside works to give hunters access to privately owned lands, especially in areas with little federally-owned land; doing so enables landowners to benefit from otherwise unprofitable property, and by bringing in hunters who frequently live in cities, it promotes better understanding between urban and rural residents. Finally, Alex pointed to Teaching Photography Online, which has 500,000 followers and is run by his wife, Sarah, and a partner in New York City, and to Bench Builders, a newly opened management consulting service in Dalton for which Rotarian Mike O’Neill is Managing Principal.

Bringing the perspective of a new arrival who has lived in many different places around the country, Alex offered four recommendations for Dalton/Whitfield: (1) getting more women into government at all levels, (2) building on the area’s powerful outdoor recreational potential, (3) embracing new manufacturing techniques required by the gig-economy, while being prepared for their disruptive impact, and (4) hiring local firms and talent—especially women.

A Rotary Minute with Jonathan Barlow

Jonathan Barlow became Senior Pastor of Dalton’s First Baptist Church in 2017. A native of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, he graduated from Mississippi College and holds the Master of Divinity degree from Mercer University’s McAfee School of Theology in Atlanta. After serving on the pastoral staff of Second Ponce de Leon Baptist Church in Atlanta, he was appointed Pastor of First Baptist Church in Royston, Georgia, from which he came to Dalton, and he is currently finishing a Doctorate of Ministry through Duke University Divinity School. His wife Susan is the Media Specialist at Gladden Middle School in Murray County, and they have three young sons.


Jonathan Barlow

 

 



February 20th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
No birthdays this period.  
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Kiker, John Kiker, Janice F. 24-Feb  
Jolly, Becky Jolly, Hilliard R. 25-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) 2/20/2007 11  
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) 2/23/2016 2  
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) 2/23/2010 8  
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) 2/23/2010 8  
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) 2/23/2016 2  
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) 2/24/1998 20  
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) 2/24/1998 20  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) Susan 23-Feb 44


The CASA Program In Northwest Georgia

by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Steve Farrow introduced Tammy Harmon, Volunteer Outreach Coordinator for the Murray/Whitfield Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), who in turn introduced Chelsea DeWaters, the agency’s Program Manager. CASA is an outreach of the Family Support Council, the area’s leading organization working on behalf of abused and neglected children and recipient of the local United Way’s largest single amount of assistance.


Chelsea DeWaters

Chelsea said that while CASA is a national program, it works entirely through locally recruited volunteers to serve local children whom the state has placed in foster care because of neglect or abuse. While a social necessity, foster care is often very difficult for everyone involved. Finding themselves in physical and psychological limbo and uncertain about their future, foster children can be acutely vulnerable, especially during the younger years that shape developmental patterns through adolescence and even into adulthood. Many, for example, may move multiple times from one foster home to another, often over great distances, requiring complex adjustments to changing domestic, educational, and social environments. Parents hoping to regain custody, and frequently grandparents and other family members as well, may need to learn or relearn fundamental responsibilities and practices of child-rearing.

Compounding these strains are demands placed upon the state’s understaffed Department of Family and Children’s Services (DFACS). Its aim is to restore children to their families within one year following intake—an aspiration currently realized in less than 20% of cases. Ideally, a DFACS social worker should have a client base of no more than twenty children, each of whom is to be seen at least twice per month, while at the same time parents are to be adequately engaged and served, receiving specific goals, with supervision exercised through the juvenile court system. Fulfilling these obligations may entail extensive travel, and workers also spend much time in court when cases are being litigated. These things, and others, impede formation of emotionally satisfactory relationships between workers and children.

As one of twelve Family Support Council programs advocating and working for the improvement of child welfare, CASA is a way to bring community involvement into the child welfare system beyond what professionals can provide. Volunteers come from widely diverse social, occupational, and educational backgrounds. Locally their ages run from 23 to 83, but a majority are retirees, mainly because they can more easily give the necessary time to the work. All volunteers are closely vetted and trained over a period of ten weeks, following which they are certified by a juvenile court and assigned to no more than two or three children at a time. The commitment to each child is flexible but intense, averaging fifteen hours per month. A volunteer is expected to cultivate a deep and personal relationship with each of his or her assigned children while also interacting with their parents, extended family members, and pertinent school and DFACS personnel, as well as with anyone else having direct influence over the conditions of a child’s existence. CASA volunteers’ experiences and observations supplement those of workers with DFACS and the juvenile courts, and they may constitute a basis for formal recommendations to the courts about case dispositions.

Chelsea closed by noting that the Murray/Whitfield CASA is currently expanding its services, adding new staff and seeking more volunteers. She encouraged Club members to consider applying, bearing in mind that even if they are necessarily in the state’s custody for the time being, the children CASA seeks to reach are not the state’s—they are ours, with needs the state is not well-equipped to meet.

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin reminded members to stop by the front desk and verify their email addresses in order to keep the Club directory up to date and communicate most efficiently. Past President Bruce Satterfield announced that the annual Rotary Track Meet will take place on March 10 and that volunteer sign-up sheets are posted in the lobby.

Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett presented Rotarians Tommy Willingham and Laurice Tatum as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellows.


Tommy Willingham, Laurice Tatum, Smitty Barnett

Past President John Richmond recognized Rotarian Paul Henson as a new Hugh Thomas Fellow in honor of his cumulative contribution of $2,500 to GRSP.


Paul Henson, John Richmond, Kevin Brunson



February 13th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) 14-Feb    
Caperton, Robert William Jr. (ROBERT) 15-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Henson, Jean Henson, Paul E. Jr. 14-Feb  
Chambliss, Alex Chambliss, Darla P 18-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Bronson, William III(WILLIAM) 2/13/2007 11  
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) 2/15/2000 18  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


February 6th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) 12-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
McKenzie, Jimmy McKenzie, Sandra D 6-Feb  
DeLay, Avalee DeLay, Scott G 6-Feb  
Adcock, Diane Adcock, Don W. 7-Feb  
Brunson, Cindy Brunson, Kevin M 8-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) Amy 12-Feb 36


Teaching and Learning Strategies at Dalton State College

by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Margaret Venable, President of Dalton State College, introduced Rotarian Dr. Patricia Chute, the College’s Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Pat came to DSC in July, 2016, after serving as a dean at two different institutions in New York, and she now oversees all academic matters at DSC. Holding a doctorate in audiology from Columbia University, with master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Hunter College, prior to her involvement in higher education administration she directed a nationally and internationally recognized program to investigate the use of cochlear implant technology in deaf children and adults—a field in which she has more than forty publications, including three books.


Dr. Patricia Chute

Pat began her presentation by pointing out how the high level of college dropouts indicates a need for more effective teaching and learning strategies. Today’s students are more diverse than ever before in their abilities, motivations, and preparedness for college. High Impact Practices (HIPs) are founded upon more direct teacher-student interaction than the traditional lecture-based format and have proven beneficial for student engagement and successful learning among students from many backgrounds. While demanding considerable time and effort from both students and faculty, HIPs strive to put a greater burden of learning upon the student, emphasizing action rather than mere memorization. Much HIP learning occurs outside the classroom, through meaningful interactions with faculty and peers and in collaboration with diverse others, all guided by frequent and substantial feedback from teachers. Curricula should be designed so that students engage in at least two HIPs courses during their undergraduate studies, one during their first year and one in their major area, and further HIP work would almost certainly be advantageous.

Pat gave many instances of how HIPs are being implemented at DSC, using strategies such as common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity and global learning, ePortfolios, service and community-based learning, internships, and capstone courses and projects. First Year Seminars introduce students experientially to the fundamental demands of college life and successful ways to cope with its challenges. In the School of Liberal Arts, some students have conducted research into particular communication phenomena in the light of specific communication theories, while others participate in service learning through social media work with local businesses or taking theatrical productions into local elementary schools. Still others have served internships with Habitat for Humanity, Shaw Industries, and the Georgia Film Academy, and a group of history students have collaborated in a “Reacting to the Past” assignment by researching and playing roles connected with India’s independence movement against British rule.

HIPs in the School of Health Professions center on an elaborately equipped Simulation Laboratory, in which high fidelity manikins can replicate a vast array of medical situations and enable 100% of students in nursing, radiation technology, respiratory technology, and social work to have at least two HIP experiences. Students in the School of Science, Technology, and Mathematics have interned in chemistry and biology with more than half a dozen local companies, finding solutions to real-world problems. Others have performed ground-breaking research into local wetland ecosystems, fostered reproduction of an endangered turtle species rarely bred in captivity, and developed a linear algebra class transformed to IBL Open Source Online Learning in collaboration with the University of Toronto. In the School of Business, service learning requires students to spend ten hours in the community and to conduct mock interviews with area businesses, learn to draft memos and write resumés maintained in ePortfolios, and to consider a period of study abroad to experience small business development in other countries. Study abroad is also a HIP in both Teacher Education and Interprofessional Education, where opportunities to study schools and businesses respectively are available in Mexico, London, Paris, and Costa Rica.

Overall, 85% of DSC students in the liberal arts experience at least two HIPs, as do 100% of all students in bachelor degree programs. Not only do these students perform better and become more likely to graduate, but faculty engaging in HIPs report more satisfying and fulfilling teaching experiences as they provide mentorship and participate at a different level. The College’s Honors Program, now in the planning process, will incorporate HIPs into the curriculum still more fully.
 

Announcements and Recognitions

Community Service Chair Amy Messick reminded members to contribute items during February for the Salvation Army Food Drive. Past President Bruce Satterfield urged people to sign up to assist at the annual Rotary Track Meet on March 10 on the sheets posted in the lobby. Rotarian Shell Underwood stated that free family portraits will be taken this evening at the Modern Woodmen of America offices for those bringing an item for the food drive, and President Kevin gave a quick summary of upcoming programs.



2018 Vocational Service Awards For First Responders

by John Hutcheson

Chris Cooke, Vocational Service Chair, announced the 2018 Vocational Service Awards for First Responders, recognizing those who have gone above and beyond regular duty and are exemplary members of their professions, embodying the Rotary ideal of Service Before Self. Award recipients and their presenters are as follows:

From the Whitfield County Fire Department, Battalion Chief Terry Warnix presented Lieutenant Nathan Callaway, who has set up a new computer system and won recognition as Whitfield County Firefighter of the Year.

From the Dalton Fire Department, Chief Todd Pangle presented Firefighter Brandon Elliott, who has shown outstanding initiative and the highest moral character and was officially commended for his actions in October, 2017, when he gave critical and limitless assistance to a neighbor whose father was in cardiac arrest.

From the Whitfield County Sheriff’s Department, on behalf of Sheriff Scott Chitwood, who had an obligation in Atlanta, Captain Steve Fields presented Sergeant Jeremy McMillan, who supervises all courtroom security arrangements and excels in all he does..

From the Dalton Police Department, Captain Chris Cooke presented Officer Chris Cochran, who became the Department’s first Code Enforcement Officer in 2013 and in 2015 was named Code Enforcement Officer of the Year by the Keep Georgia Beautiful organization.

From Hamilton EMS, Director Scott Raedeker presented Paramedic Chris Downey, who provided superior aid in “austere environments” existing after Hurricanes Irma and Matthew and more recently gave exceptional medical care in “sleeper” cardiac cases with patients showing no usual symptoms of cardiac distress but who would have died without Chris’s intervention.


Vocational Service Award winners

President Kevin concluded the meeting with a statement of thanks to all First Responders as well as those being recognized today.

Announcements and Recognition

President Kevin asked all members to stop by the front desk and verify their email addresses in order to keep the Club directory up to date and communicate most efficiently. He also noted that Believe Greater Dalton’s Community Pride focus group will meet today at First Baptist Church and invited all interested persons to attend

Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett presented Rotarian Jim Hawkins as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow.


Jim Hawkins and Smitty Barnett

 



January 30th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
McKenzie, Sandra D (SANDY) 1-Feb    
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) 1-Feb    
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) 3-Feb    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Weaver, Virginia Weaver, William B 1-Feb  
Barnwell, Delle Barnwell, William L 2-Feb  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
McClurg, Charles R. (RONNIE) 2/1/1989 29  
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) 2/1/1996 22  
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) 2/1/1981 37  
Adcock, Don W. (DON) 2/1/1979 39  
Cope, Don (DON) 2/1/1996 22  
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) 2/1/1972 46  
Bestawros, Onsy A (ONSY) 2/3/2015 3  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


Junior Achievement in Northwest Georgia


by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Anna Adamson, director of Junior Achievement of Northwest Georgia, began her presentation with a Rotary Minute recounting her background. A native of Georgia, she attended the University of Georgia and Texas Christian University, earning degrees in early childhood education. While her husband was president of the Ringgold Rotary Club, she was drawn to Rotary herself through work with a GRSP student.


Anna Adamson

Using an informative PowerPoint slide and video show, Anna related that the Junior Achievement (JA) program serves ten million students in 120 countries worldwide. Its purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed by spreading concepts and best practices of entrepreneurship which will narrow the gap between skill sets needed in a global economy and the preparation of students and their potential employers. To these ends, Junior Achievement is reimagining academic growth in relation to everyday learning needs by emphasizing relevance, authenticity, and experience. Research shows that many students begin disengaging from active learning during the middle school years, and beginning with that age cohort Junior Achievement has devised simulated economies in which students play all roles—employers, employees, suppliers, producers, taxpayers, consumers, etc.

For doing so, the principal vehicles are the JA Discovery Centers, of which two are currently operative in Georgia, in Atlanta and Lawrenceville, with a third scheduled to open in Cumming in August 2018. Development of these centers created a consortium of leaders from the business and education communities who believed that when students understand how academics apply to the real world, they are more motivated in the classroom and ultimately achieve higher academic and professional success. The JA Discovery Centers blend key components of JA to deliver state-of-the-art learning facilities where students apply concepts they learned in the classroom in authentic and immersive experience. Upon arrival, students escape into a simulated version of their hometown, otherwise known as JA BizTown and JA Finance Park. Here they work alongside their peers and volunteers as they discover a greater understanding of financial concepts, build 21st century skills, and foster the entrepreneurial spirit.

The JA Discovery Centers in Georgia are collective efforts from five school districts, including Atlanta Public Schools, DeKalb County Schools, Fulton County Schools, Gwinnett County Public Schools and Marietta City Schools, and more than seventy partners, such as Assurant, AT&T, Chick-fil-A, Cisco, Delta Air Lines, The Home Depot, and SunTrust. Annually, more than 65,000 students visit the JA Discovery Centers to complete a one day simulation at JA BizTown or JA Finance Park.

The JA Northwest Georgia District is eager to build a Discovery Center in this area, for which Dalton would be the ideal location. Along with a physical structure of at least 25,000 sq.ft., the facility will need strong support from local governments and school systems as well as from private capital sources and an adequate corps of volunteers to engage, invest, and advocate.

Anna concluded by introducing Lee Highsmith of Gainesville, who is executive director of JA for the North Georgia District. She also reminded Club members about JA of Northwest Georgia’s 13th Annual Business Hall of Fame reception and dinner on March 8, 2018, which will honor Dalton industrialist and entrepreneur Bob Shaw as a “Rising Star.”
 

Announcements

President Kevin called on Community Service Chair Amy Messick, who announced the February food drive on behalf of the Salvation Army.



January 23rd Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) 24-Jan    
Carter, Teresa (TERESA) 28-Jan    
Griffin, Ronald L (RON) 27-Jan    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Chappell, Bennieta Chappell, William J. 29-Jan  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Bowling, John (JOHN) 1/23/2001 17  
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) 1/27/2009 9  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


The Appalachian Regional Commission and Northwest Georgia


Rotarian Celeste Creswell introduced Brittany Pittman, formerly Sole Commissioner for Murray County and now one of two Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) Program Managers for Georgia.


Celeste Creswell and Brittany Pittman

Brittany described the ARC as a federal-state partnership whose mission is to innovate, partner, and invest to build community capacity and strengthen economic growth in Appalachia. Representing a partnership of federal, state, and local government, it was established by an act of Congress in 1965 and is composed of the governors of the thirteen Appalachian states and a federal co-chair appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Local participation is provided through multi-county local development districts.

ARC invests in activities which address the five goals identified in the Commission's strategic plan:

1: Economic Opportunities Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia's economy.

2: Ready Workforce Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.

3: Critical Infrastructure Invest in critical infrastructure—especially broadband; transportation, including the Appalachian Development Highway System; and water/wastewater systems.

4: Natural and Cultural Assets Strengthen Appalachia's community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region's natural and cultural heritage assets.

5: Leadership and Community Capacity Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.

Each year ARC provides funding for several hundred investments in the Appalachian Region in areas such as business development, education and job training, telecommunications, infrastructure, community development, housing, and transportation. These projects create thousands of new jobs; improve local water and sewer systems; increase school readiness; expand access to health care; assist local communities with strategic planning; and provide technical and managerial assistance to emerging businesses.

In Georgia the work of the commission is administered through the state Department of Community Affairs in the 37 eligible counties, with special emphasis placed on rural development. Funding is on a quarterly cycle and is governed by federal regulations. The maximum investment for a particular project is $600,000, with support generally limited to two years after which the project is expected to be self-sustaining. Priority for awarding grants leans toward ready-to-go proposals. Depending on the availability of other resources, agencies and jurisdictions may be required to provide matching funds, but total underwriting is possible where it may be warranted.

Brittany summarized a variety of local projects which have received ARC support, Cultural grants have gone toward restoration of the historic Western & Atlantic Railroad Depot in Tunnel Hill, support for the Sautee Nacoochee Center in White County, renovation of Howard Finster’s Paradise Garden in Chatooga County, and operation of the Farmers’ Market at the Hartwell Deport in Hart County. Infrastructure initiatives include sewer expansion in Cohutta and Ringgold (the latter to accommodate the needs of Shaw Industries), water system improvements in Helen and Chatsworth, development of the Carbondale Business Park in Whitfield County, and creation of a wireless Hot Zone in Gainesville. In Cedartown, One Door Polk consolidates a variety of social and healthcare services focused on family and juvenile needs, and Primary Healthcare Centers receiving ARC support are scattered across the area under the Commission’s purview. ARC involvement with workforce development has led to partnerships with Georgia Northwestern Technical College and North Georgia Technical College, and its support of regional tourism is reflected in the construction of a pedestrian trail connecting the Summerville Depot with the local downtown area.

Brittany concluded with an overview of grant application procedures, which may be found online at https.//www.arc.gov. 

Announcements

President Kevin opened the first meeting of 2018 by wishing everyone a happy new year. He also read a touching and heartfelt letter from Natima Walker of the GreenHouse thanking the Club for its support, especially the funds raised to ensure the 36 children in the GreenHouse’s care received personal Christmas gifts and a meal catered by the Oakwood Café

Smitty Barnett, Foundation Chair, outlined the procedures for becoming a Paul Harris Fellow and emphasized the Club’s ongoing effort to have 100% of its members become Paul Harris Fellows.

 



January 16th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Winter, Larry E. (LARRY) 17-Jan    
Bronson, William III (WILLIAM) 19-Jan    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Smith, Rebecca Smith, Clark C. 18-Jan  
Tatum, Sharon Tatum, Laurice A. 20-Jan  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Gazaway, Kristie (KRISTIE) 1/17/2017 1  
Parker, Hoyt Jason (JASON) 1/18/2011 7  
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) 1/19/2010 8  
Reed, Amanda (AMANDA) 1/19/2010 8  
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) 1/20/2015 3  
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) 1/20/2015 3  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Mixer, Mark S (MARK) Kimberly 19-Jan 5
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) Sarah 20-Jan 50


Christmas Music


by John Hutcheson


First United Methodist Church Children's Choir

Rotarian Tommy Willingham, Senior Pastor of Dalton First United Methodist Church, introduced a group of fourteen members of the church’s Children’s Choir, who presented a program of Christmas songs and carols under the direction of Ms. Nicole Harbin. Accompanied at the piano by Minister of Music Jeff Harbin, the choir sang their selections from memory, and Rotarians were charmed and inspired by their renditions of “O Christmas Tree,” “Good Christian Men Rejoice,” “The First Nowell.” “On Christmas A Long Time Ago,” “ It Came Upon the Midnight Clear,” “All Through the Night,” “A Very Special King Is Born Tonight,” “Go Tell It On the Mountain,” and “We Wish You A Merry Christmas.”
 

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin reminded members that there will be no meetings on December 26 or January 2; the next meeting will be on January 9, and the next Board meeting will be on January 16. Past President Bill Bowen announced that Club members had collected more than $1,700 in the Salvation Army red kettles during the past week.

Community Service Chair Amy Messick was recognized as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow, receiving her award from Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett.


Smitty Barnett and Amy Messick



December 26th and January 3rd Bulletin


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) 1-Jan    
Didier, John M. (JOHN) 4-Jan    
Kelehear, Leon S. (SPARKY) 7-Jan    
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) 26-Dec    
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) 30-Dec    
Parrott, V DeForrest III (DEFORREST) 30-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Blackman, Linda Blackman, Bill M 1-Jan  
Farmer, Sierra Farmer, Joseph 3-Jan  
Burt, Roger Burt, Amanda 5-Jan  
Schwell, Judy Schwenn, John O. 7-Jan  
McLeod, Carolyn (CAROL) McLeod, Robert S. 27-Dec  
Sanders, Mary Etta Sanders, Drayton M II 28-Dec  
Minter, Melissa Minter, B. Scott 28-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Combs, William Dan (DAN) 1/1/1986 32  
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) 1/1/1976 42  
Smith, Clark C. (CLARK) 12/31/1999 18  
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr.(ROY) 12/31/2002 15  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Payne, Charles F Jr(CHUCK) Angelina 2-Jan 30
Aft, David (DAVID) Pauline 3-Jan 4
Brantley, Valerie K (VAL) Tray 7-Jan 12
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) Ricky 8-Jan 18
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) Cherri 8-Jan 18
Kirkman, Lowell D. (LOWELL) Lou 26-Dec 19
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) Nancy 27-Dec 44
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) Becky 29-Dec 50
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) Teresa 30-Dec 27


Believe Greater Dalton


by John Hutcheson


Rob Bradham

President Kevin introduced Rotarian Rob Bradham, President and CEO of the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce, for a presentation on the Believe Greater Dalton initiative, a five-year strategic plan to promote the community’s economic development and improve its quality of life. After an amusing video about his “vision” for Dalton based on artificial creation of a “river” though the middle of town, Rob related how the plan actually originated two years ago in conversations he had with a wide range of local citizens by way of getting to know his new home town after arriving from the Chattanooga Chamber. During these discussions three trends emerged, i.e., Dalton’s “heyday” ended with the onset of the Great Recession, the city is now poised for a new era, and a new strategic plan is needed. Under co-chairs Bryan Hair and Chuck Dobbins, a Steering Committee of 23 community leaders from Dalton’s public, private, and non-profit sectors engaged Market Street Services, a consulting firm which advised on the successful renewal of the downtown district in Rome, Georgia. Under Market Street’s guidance, a survey was conducted to ascertain what local citizens think of the community and how it might be improved, to which there were 2,220 responses. At the same time, a comparative study examined nine Southern communities similar in size to Dalton. This showed that while Dalton’s regulatory climate and tax structure generated the best business climate in the group, by other metrics such as downtown vibrancy, housing options, educational outcomes, and support for entrepreneurs, Dalton ranked at or near the bottom, with its economy excessively dependent on a single industry.

Perhaps the most startling finding was that 62% of workers in Dalton and Whitfield County who earn $40,000 or more per year live outside the area. This statistic reflects a talent drain to Atlanta and Chattanooga, which in turn contributes to a low tax base, an insufficient quality of place, and a poor community self-image. Especially distressing is the community’s low rate of educational attainment—among counties nationwide with populations exceeding 100,000, by this criterion Whitfield falls numerically within the bottom ten.

Reducing the 62% external residency figure is fundamental for the success of any plan for community improvement To that end, six strategies have been devised, each managed by a working group of Steering Committee members and volunteers and appropriately staffed through the Chamber of Commerce, the Downtown Dalton Development Authority, and the Dalton-Whitfield Joint Development Authority. These include Education, led by Brian Cooksey and Joe Yarbrough; Housing, led by Todd Harrison and Melanie Suggs; Downtown District, led by David Aft and John Davis; Economic Development, led by Kevin Harris and Jeff Myers; Entrepreneurship, led by Bryan Macon; and Community Pride, led by Deanna Mathis and Charlie Bethel. The budget for the entire project is $5.25 million, more than $2.2 million of which the public sector is already spending in areas covered by the six strategies. Commitment of an additional $1 million is being requested from the public sector, along with a commitment of $1.97 million from the private sector, and the project will officially launch on January 1, 2018, to end on December 31, 2024. Rob concluded with appeals for volunteers and for investment via the Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia.

Complete information on the plan and its six strategies is available at www.believegreaterdalton.com .
 

Announcements

President Kevin read a letter of thanks from the Northwest Georgia Family Crisis Center for donations of personal and household goods contributed by Dalton Rotarians during September and October. Community Service Chair Amy Messick presented a check for $1,675 to Natima Walker of the Dalton GreenHouse for use in purchasing preferred Christmas gifts for the 36 children in the GreenHouse’s care.


Amy Messick and Natima Walker

Past President John Richmond asked Club members to include GRSP student Linnéa Neman in their social plans, and Past President Bill Bowen asked for a few more volunteers to ring a bell for the Salvation Army.



December 19th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Payne, Charles F Jr (CHUCK) 22-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Taylor, Joanie Taylor, Zachary 24-Dec  
Cooke, Cathy Cooke, Christopher M 24-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) Sierra 20-Dec 8
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) Carolyn (CAROL) 21-Dec 52
Adamson, Anna Y (ANNA) Zach 22-Dec 10
Cope, Don (DON) Laurie Lee 24-Dec 4
Thomas, Don R. (DON) Mary 25-Dec 3


Entrepreneurship: Getting An Early Start


by John Hutcheson

Community Service Chair Amy Messick introduced Tripp Phillips, a twelve-year-old sixth-grade student at Dalton Middle School who has become quite possibly Dalton’s youngest entrepreneur and certainly one of its more successful. With the encouragement of his parents and teachers and the assistance of his ten-year-old sister, Tripp has developed, patented, and is now marketing a product called Leg-Glue, a non-permanent, water-soluble adhesive to prevent Lego constructions from easily shattering..


Tripp Phillips

Leg-Glue originated during Tripp’s fifth-grade year at Westwood Elementary School, when members of his Challenge class were assigned to create something helpful both to young people and to adults. Aided by his father, Lee Phillips, Tripp developed Leg-Glue, and his project won a regional competition.

From his peers’ comments as well as from his own experience, Tripp perceived a strong demand for Leg-Glue, and this led him to learn the fundamentals of starting and operating a business. Buying ingredients and materials, manufacturing, packaging, and marketing his product, and getting paid by purchasers all added up to hard work, even with his sister managing production and shipping. Attracting the interest of Amazon was a major achievement, and Amazon now moves 25 times more of his product than all of his other vehicles combined. In the meantime, packaging has shifted from jars, which were tedious to fill, to much more convenient squeeze-packs (a change which was Tripp’s idea). When the costs of using a supplier for these from the Atlanta area proved impractical, a far less expensive alternative vendor was found in China. Along the way, Tripp learned about other essential matters such as the need for a patent (expensive but necessary to protect his intellectual property), a product logo that does not invade the Lego copyright, and advertising—he showed Rotarians the company’s first commercial video, which will soon be available on the Internet.

To coordinate production with demand, Tripp has also grasped the importance of business forecasting. Last year he sold 7,000 units; this year he will probably sell about 9,000. Competition has emerged in the form of spray bottles from a concern called Spray ‘n’ Play (which he is watching carefully for legal infringement), and with the development of new sport packs, he is planning for direct retail sales. Responding to a question, Tripp said that while he returns part of his profits to his business, he has invested as well in BitCoin, and he is also saving to buy a car. In the spirit of the holiday season he announced that Leg-Glue will give each GreenHouse child a large bag of Legos as a Christmas present,

Tripp’s highly mature and articulate presentation of his enterprise gained enthusiastic applause from his audience.

Pie-faces for the GreenHouse

Amy Messick returned to the podium to reveal which prominent Rotarian would receive a pie in the face as the finale of the campaign to raise funds for the GreenHouse. Votes cast by Rotarians over the past several weeks determined the winner (?) to be Past President Bruce Satterfield, and Amy called on guest Lee Oliver, who is an experienced auctioneer, to auction the right to throw the pie. Lee opened the bidding at $10. Spirited competition took it to $70, offered by President Kevin Brunson who, it must be admitted, was somewhat tentative in his placement of the pie (key lime, Bruce’s stated preference) in his predecessor’s face.


Bruce Satterfield, post-pie

Amy then said that a second winner would also receive a pie in the face, and that this would go to Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead. Lee again opened an auction for pie-throwing privileges, which started this time at $70 and closed with a $75 bid by Judy Eliot. After noting that she had waited twenty years for this moment, Judy went at her target with great relish, enhancing her direct hit by a relentless twist of her ammunition. Never one to be caught up short, Frank thanked Judy with a smacking kiss, thereby leaving her face and hair decorated like his own with a generous amount of key lime pie filling.


Frank and Judy

Amidst these revels, Lee Oliver, who is Commander of the local American Legion Post 112, presented a check for $500 to the Club on behalf of the Legion. Lee stated that the principal sponsor of this donation was one of the Post’s members, Tim Rowe of Dalton Funeral Home, and that the funds could be used however the Rotary Club deemed appropriate.


Lee Oliver

Meanwhile, it was determined that the pie-in-the-face raffle had raised a total of $1,004. Combined with funds from the Rotary Foundation’s grant to our club and contributions from the Dalton and Chatsworth Police Departments, Dalton Rotarians will convey a total of $4,010 to the GreenHouse.


Natima Walker, Amy Messick, Frank Hogshead, Bruce Satterfield

Announcements and Recognitions

Past President Bill Bowen reminded everyone to sign up for the Salvation Army bell-ringing during the week of December 11 to 16. There is now a “Gold Kettle” which would provide for a doubling of the receipts on one day; our club will consider participation. Vocational Service Chair Chris Cooke presented a check for $1,065 on behalf of the Dalton Police Department, generated by the Department’s November No-Shave campaign, to be donated to the GreenHouse, and he announced that an additional $400 contribution will come from a similar effort by the Chatsworth Police Department.


Chris Cooke



December 12th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Barnwell, William L (BILL) 14-Dec    
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr. (MAURICE) 17-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
McClure, Storm McClure, Douglas E 12-Dec  
Pratt, Shaun Pratt, Vallarie D. 12-Dec  
Poehlman, Sally Poehlman, John H. 17-Dec  
Barnett, Tammy Barnett, George S. 18-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Minor, John Thomas V(JOHN) 12/17/2013 4  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) Joanne 12-Dec 58
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) Barbara 18-Dec 57
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) Dell 18-Dec 46


Project Share


by Kathryn Sellers

The program about Project Share was introduced by Tom Bundros of Dalton Utilities. Lori McDaniel and Doug McClure described the project as “neighbors helping neighbors.”


Tom Bundros, Lori McDaniel, Doug McClure

Customers of Dalton Utilities may sign up for giving a certain amount each month on their bill. The bill can be rounded up to the next dollar (for no more than 99 cents/month) or a pledge can be a set amount each month. Dalton Utilities collects the money and it is sent to the Salvation Army each month. The Salvation Army vets needy people and provides help on their power bills with the receipts from “Project Share.” Doug suggested that this is a great way to help anonymously. He stated, “If not YOU, then who?” He said this effort grows out of their focus on “soup, soap, salvation” in which they recognize that a group cannot help someone spiritually if they are homeless or have nothing to eat. By helping people stay in their homes, this is “homeless prevention.” Folks are asked lots of questions to determine real need and coordination with other agencies such as DOC-UP to avoid duplication. If needed, they are provided with financial counseling.

The program was started in Dalton over 30 years ago, but the receipts have gone down in the last few years. Dalton Utilities is trying to increase the receipts in order to help more people. Lori McDaniel stated that they could do much more with each household giving just one dollar a month.

Doug suggested that the program does these items:

-Maintains the guests’ dignity

-Meets obvious and less obvious needs

-Maintains positive relationships with vendors (Dalton Utilities, Georgia Power, etc.)

-Cultivates new and donors and respects current donors

-Is more than a handout – part of a way out!

To sign up for Project Share on line: click www.dutil.com/sign-up-for-project-share and tell them to either “round up” to the next dollar or donate a set amount per month.
 

Announcements and Recognitions

Bill Bowen requested that everyone sign up for the Salvation Army bell ringing during the week of December 11 to 16. There is now a “Gold Kettle” which would provide for a doubling of the receipts on one day. Our club will consider participation.

Amy Messick announced that Past President Bruce Satterfield won the contest for being the person who gets a pie in his face at the next meeting! Receipts were $750 from our Rotary Foundation and $780 from club members! GreenHouse is very grateful. Next week, there will be an auction for the privilege of throwing the pie in Bruce’s face. Be ready to bid.


Amy Messick and Bruce Satterfield

There was an induction of three new members of Rotary: Annalee Harlan, John Wilson, and Jonathan Barlowe. A big thank you goes out to the sponsors!


New Members



December 5th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) 6-Dec    
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) 11-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Mooney, Bobby Mooney, Patricia H 5-Dec  
Parrott, Eugenia Parrott, V DeForrest III 10-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Pangle, William T (TODD) 12/6/2016 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr.(PAUL) Alicia 5-Dec 25
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) Denise 6-Dec 42
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr.(MAURICE) Betty 7-Dec 49


The Salvation Army And Emergency Disaster Relief


by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Doug McClure, Captain of the Salvation Army’s Dalton post, surveyed the Army’s work in disaster relief. During the aftermath of Hurricane Irma this past September, he was dispatched to southern Georgia, where he spent two weeks coordinating Emergency Disaster Services. Although many disasters originate naturally, some are caused by human action—Doug’s first disaster experience was as a counselor in New York City following the 9-11 terrorist attack in 2001.


Doug McClure

Like everything else the Salvation Army does, its disaster relief is grounded in Christian obligation, with special reference to the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well recounted in John 4: 4-15. On any specific occasion several factors will influence what is actually provided; these include the type of event, its severity and duration, the availability of financial resources, survivors’ needs, and assistance from other organizations. The fundamental mission is to meet immediate needs more than to give long-term support. The process is completely transparent fiscally, and there has never been any financial scandal.

The Salvation Army is a hierarchical, paramilitary organization, similar to police and fire departments, and this is reflected in its Incident Command Structure. With fifteen years of relief experience covering twelve separate disasters, Doug is the Georgia Incident Commander. On his recent deployment to South Georgia he led a team of 75 Salvationists, charged with providing spiritual and emotional care as well as food and other material necessities. Food delivery is the Army’s primary service in a disaster, supporting hydration, nourishment, and opportunities for rest. Using slides, Doug illustrated and described several types of mobile feeding units. These can cook or not, as needed, and range from food distribution vehicles serving hundreds of meals per day to mobile kitchens capable of serving two or three thousand meals per day, to tractor-trailer-sized field kitchens which can produce an average of 20,000 meals per day and even offer drive-by service. Currently the Army is feeding seven to eight thousand meals per day in Puerto Rico as the island struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria.

Local or short-term disasters will draw on local material and human resources; major disasters will mobilize support over appropriately wider Salvation Army jurisdictions and involve individual assignments of up to fourteen days. Personnel available for service must be approved by Army authorities and will be placed on stand-by, with 24-hour notice, until needed. The Army carefully manages deployments, handling travel and housing arrangements and providing timely relief with a keen awareness of the dangers of post-traumatic stress disorder. It offers excellent support for workers dealing with sadness, grief, and other negative reactions, checking within ten days after return from a deployment and again after a month.

“Bad things do happen in the world, like war, natural disasters, disease,” former CNN anchor Daryn Kagan has remarked. “But out of these situations always arise stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things.” Her observation aptly describes the work of the Salvation Army in disaster relief.

Announcements

President Kevin Brunson appealed to everyone to remember the significance of Veterans Day, and he recognized those members present who were veterans. He also noted that the November Board meeting has been cancelled, and the Club will not meet on November 21, the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Vocational Service Chair Chris Cooke asked members to cast their votes at the front desk in the pie-in-the-face contest for the benefit of the GreenHouse, and Community Service Chair Amy Messick reminded the Club about the Whitfield Education Foundation Celebrity Spelling Bee to be held this evening.



November 28th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Griffin, Joseph Bryan (BRYAN) 23-Nov    
Underwood, Michelle (SHELL) 26-Nov    
Barnett, George S. (SMITTY) 1-Dec    
Venable, Margaret H. (MARGARET) 1-Dec    
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) 4-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Willingham, Denise Willingham, Tommy G 22-Nov  
Jones, Mary Lynn Jones, Miller T. 25-Nov  
Partain, Pam Partain, Jack 26-Nov  
Tripp, Charlie Tripp, Larry E. 26-Nov  
Chute, Bob Chute, Patricia M 27-Nov  
Maret, Carla Maret, Michael S. 3-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) 11/20/2012 5  
Little, William Norris Sr.(NORRIS) 11/20/2001 16  
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA SRIVASTAVA) 11/20/2012 5  
Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr.(PAUL) 11/22/2011 6  
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) 11/29/2005 12  
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) 11/29/2005 12  
Hutcheson, John A. Jr.(JOHN) 11/29/2005 12  
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) 11/29/2005 12  
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) 11/29/2005 12  
Kirkman, Lowell D. (LOWELL) 12/1/1972 45  
Henson, Paul E. Jr.(PAUL) 12/1/1968 49  
Brooker, Robert H. (BOB) 12/1/1976 41  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) Sandy 20-Nov 52
Partain, Jack (JACK) Pam 21-Nov 31
Campbell, J Carl (CARL) Kristy 21-Nov 16
Jones, J. Sherwood Jr.(SHERWOOD) Jean 23-Nov 56
Minter, B. Scott (SCOTT) Melissa 29-Nov 20
Jones, J Sherwood III(SHERWOOD) Danielle 2-Dec 22
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) Kayanne 3-Dec 29


Helping Others, Doing The Right Thing: The Work Of The Boy Scouts

by John Hutcheson

Community Service Chair Amy Messick introduced Brandon Kleimann, Senior District Executive for the Conasauga District of the Northwest Georgia Council of the Boy Scouts of America. Previously from North Carolina, Brandon has been involved with Scouting for more than twenty years, moving from Cub Scout membership to Eagle Scout to professional Scouting administrator. He in turn recognized Greg Epperson, Cubmaster of Pack 65 at Pleasant Grove Methodist Church, whose three sons are all Cubs and for whom Scouting is truly a family endeavor.


Brandon Kleimann

Brandon first focused his presentation on local Scouting. The Northwest Georgia Council delivers Scouting programs in the seven counties of Whitfield, Murray, Chattooga, Floyd, Polk, Gordon, and Bartow. Its Conasauga District, covering Whitfield and Murray Counties, includes 34 Scouting units which serve about 650 boys. In 2016 the district’s Scouts collected more than 10,400 pounds of food for delivery to the needy through the Scouting for Food program, and they participated in over 3,500 community service hours. Fifteen achieved their Eagle Scout rank (an accomplishment reached by only 2% of boys in the United States). Seventy-two attended the Merit Badge College at Dalton Middle School and 91 attended Summer Camp, traveled to a National High Adventures Base, or worked as staff in these facilities, while 168 Cubs attended Twilight Adventures Camp at the North Georgia Fairgrounds or Camp Sidney Dew, financing themselves through the sale of coupon cards. Camp Sidney Dew, founded in 1939 on 650+ acres in The Pocket in Floyd County, is the Northwest Georgia Council’s principal camping facility, providing area Scouts a full range of opportunities to learn teamwork and develop their personal character and skills.

Turning to Scouting generally, Brandon surveyed its seven programs: Lions, a kindergarten pilot program new to Northwest Georgia; Cub Scouts, for ages 6 to 10; Boy Scouts, for ages 11-17; Venture Crews and Sea Scout Ships, for ages 14 to 21 (ironically, the largest number of Sea Scouts is in Kansas); Explorer Posts, for ages 19-21; Learning for Life, for grades K through 12; and STEM Scouts, now in its pilot phase. Scouting offers 135 merit badge programs, and it operates several National High Adventure Bases: the Northern Tier, consisting of bases in Minnesota, Ontario, and Manitoba; the Florida Sea Base; Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, and The Summit in West Virginia. The Summit hosted the National Scout Jamboree in 2017 and it will be the location for the World Scout Jamboree in in 2019 which will attract 10,000 Scouts from the U.S. and 40,000 from the rest of the world.

Kleimann concluded with a review of the Boy Scouts of America’s Mission and Vision; the mission is “to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law,” and the vision sees the organization as “the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.” A study conducted among Philadelphia youth between 2012 and 2015 by Tufts University showed that Scouting works strongly to build the virtues it espouses and measurably cultivates teamwork, problem-solving, determination, and an ethic of helping others and doing the right thing.

Announcements

President Kevin Brunson appealed to everyone to be sure and vote in today’s elections, and he also noted that the Club will not meet on November 21, the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Vocational Service Chair Chris Cooke reminded members to cast their votes at the front desk in the pie-in-the-face contest for the benefit of the GreenHouse.



November 14th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Townsend, Patrick J. (PAT) 14-Nov    
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) 16-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Miller, Sara Miller, Charles Dalton 15-Nov  
Dickson, Sherry Dickson, Thomas S. 15-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) 11/20/2012 5  
Little, William Norris Sr.(NORRIS) 11/20/2001 16  
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA SRIVASTAVA) 11/20/2012 5  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) Sandy 20-Nov 52


Rotary Foundation Reminders

by John Hutcheson

Smitty Barnett gave a presentation about the Rotary Foundation.  He noted that District Governor “Coop” Cooper is strongly advocating Rotary service and has challenged all members to become involved with the Foundation, which is Rotary’s most convenient vehicle for enabling Rotarians to become people of action.  The Foundation has received the highest ratings from a wide range of charity evaluators, for both its stewardship of its assets and its use of them—91% of its funds are spent on programs—and in 2016 it was named the World’s Outstanding Foundation by the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

The Foundation’s Annual Fund is the principal mechanism for distributing aid and assistance at all levels, from the local to the international.  Its six causes include promoting peace, providing clean water, saving mothers and children, supporting education, growing local economies, and fighting disease.  Each of these offers opportunities for individual Rotarians to provide direct support; a good example is that of microloans to grow local self-sustenance in underdeveloped areas.  The Fund Share System gives equal amounts to District Designated Funds, on the one hand, and the World Fund on the other.  The Foundation’s Global Grants have had very large impacts, most notably the near-eradication of polio.  It also helps victims of post-polio syndrome, which Smitty has seen first-hand in his own family.


Smitty Barnett

Rotary International is mounting the “Every Rotarian Every Year” campaign to generate a steady flow of support to the Foundation—in 2016 this brought 140 million dollars into the Annual Fund.  Clubs supporting the campaign receive special banners indicating their levels of participation and contribution, and our own Club is striving to achieve a membership of 100% Paul Harris Fellows.  Since its establishment in 1917, the Foundation has contributed more than three billion dollars to various projects—a long way from the contribution of $26.50 which established its initial corpus. While a Paul Harris Fellowship requires a member to make cumulative gifts of at least $1,000 (sometimes achieved through the donation of recognition points accumulated by club members who wish to assist others toward qualification as Paul Harris Fellows), contributions of any size become significant when they are leveraged through the Foundation.  Local projects partially supported by resources acquired from the Foundation include the Family Crisis Center, the GreenHouse, the Tree Planting Project, and the Dalton Food Bank.

Smitty closed with an appeal to members to attend the Celebrity Spelling Bee on November 14, when a number of local luminaries, including Rotarians Pat Chute, Amy Messick, Chuck Payne, John Richmond, Archana Srivastava, and William Venable, will compete for the benefit of the Whitfield Education Foundation.

A Rotary Minute with Kristie Gazaway

Kristie Gazaway, who received her Blue Badge this past July, has been married to her husband Johnny for 23 years and has three children—two boys and a girl.  A Dalton native, she deeply loves her community, but most of all her Savior, Jesus.  Her parents founded Jarrett Business Machines in 1985, which is now JBM Office Solutions and remains a family-owned and operated business.  She is thankful to God for their success and grateful for her family’s opportunity to both work together and live together on their property in the Beaverdale area.


Kristie Gazaway

President Kevin presented his Blue Badge to State Senator Chuck Payne, and Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett introduced Rotarian Teresa Carter as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow.


Chuck Payne and Teresa Carter

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin Brunson called on Rotarian Zach Taylor, who said that Past President Bruce Satterfield will provide transportation for our GRSP students this coming weekend to the GRSP convocation in Atlanta but that someone is still needed to bring them back to Dalton on Sunday.



November 7th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) 8-Nov    
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) 8-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Campbell, Kristy Campbell, J Carl 11-Nov  
Hawkins, Nancy Hawkins, Jim R. 11-Nov  
Morehouse, Dianne Morehouse, Gordon C. 12-Nov  
Cope, Laurie Lee Cope, Don 13-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) 11/10/2015 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Venable, William M (WILLIAM) Ruth 11-Nov 1
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) S. G. 12-Nov 29


A Visit From The Chancellor

Rotarian Dr. Margaret Venable, President of Dalton State College, introduced Dr. Steve Wrigley, since January 1, 2017, the 13th Chancellor of the University System of Georgia. Holder of an undergraduate degree from Georgia State University and a doctorate in history from Northwestern University, Dr. Wrigley was Executive Vice Chancellor for Administration for the University System prior to his appointment as Chancellor, having previously served at the University of Georgia as Senior Vice President for External Affairs, Vice President for Government Relations, and Director of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government. Before entering academic administration he worked in state government, including five years as chief of staff for Governor Zell Miller during which he assisted in creation of the state lottery and the HOPE scholarship program. He is active in several wildlife organizations, including the Georgia Wildlife Federation and the Nature Conservancy of Georgia, and he is also on the board of the Georgia Humanities Council.


Chancellor Wrigley and Dr. Venable

Chancellor Wrigley began his remarks with praise for President Venable as a leader among the 28 presidents in the University System. Turning to the question of what the University System is about, he answered that it is to create, transfer, and apply knowledge. Its Board of Regents oversees 28 colleges and universities, the Georgia Public Library System, and the Georgia Archives, which altogether comprise 320,000 students, 48,000 faculty and staff, and a budget of $8.4 billion. Its economic impact exceeds $7 billion annually, and to achieve its purposes the System has three goals. The first is to raise educational attainment levels across the state, and it is gratifying to see that degree completion has risen 18% during the last five years. The second goal is to be affordable, and here again results are encouraging. Over the past five years tuition has risen only 2.2%, and efforts to hold fees and textbook costs down have shown success, especially through the expansion of online offerings using electronic teaching materials. A recent study at Rice University showed the University System of Georgia to be leading the nation in textbook savings.


Chancellor Wrigley

The third goal is to become more efficient. Consolidations have reduced the number of System institutions from 35 to 28, and two more mergers—Armstrong State with Georgia Southern and Bainbridge with Abraham Baldwin—are pending; eliminating program duplication and reducing administrative structures on these campuses promise a savings of $18 million over the next five years. Online courses have increased over the last six years from 1,500 to more than 7,000 and now include entire degree programs. Through Complete College Georgia, the System participates in Complete College America, by which the Gates Foundation assists students to carry full loads each term and avoid undue delays in graduation. Such progress is also served by changes in remedial education, which is now called co-requisite education; rather than being relegated to separate, non-credit courses, remedial work is built into regular credit courses, successful completion of which has risen from 18% to 70% or 80%. A technique based on the concept of “predictive analytics,” developed at Georgia State, encourages early determination of a major and tracks a student’s progress in it, intervening as necessary without waiting for the student to take the initiative in getting assistance—last year Georgia State saw 50,000 such interventions. A complementary strategy has led to the development of “meta-majors,” made up of courses applicable to a broad range of more specific majors.

Changes such as these have brought about more positive differences in the System’s educational outcomes over the last four or five years than in the preceding forty or fifty. It is now recognized that students want low barriers to the delivery of services, and through an initiative called Completion 25 a group is rethinking curriculum, support services, and other aspects of the System’s delivery structures. An outside consultant has been engaged to conduct a comprehensive program review over the next three years at both the System and institutional levels. All this matters because knowledge drives innovation, which in turn drives the economy, and without economic growth the quality of life in Georgia will stagnate or deteriorate.

Announcements

President Kevin Brunson reminded the Club that October 24 is World Polio Day, and that through the work of Rotary International and its partners, only twelve cases of polio are now known to exist all in Afghanistan and Pakistan, down from 350,000 worldwide when the eradication initiative began thirty years ago. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is hosting a celebration in Seattle and has pledged to match Rotary’s support on a 2:1 basis, thus adding $1.3 billion in financial resources to the $1.7 billion previously acquired. In addition, Rotary is giving $49.5 million in grants to support immunization work, with another $7.4 million going to particularly vulnerable countries.

Rotarian Zach Taylor invited club members to become better acquainted with this year’s GRSP student, Linnéa Neman, and he asked for volunteers to provide transportation for Linnéa and Clare Ballentine, the student sponsored by the Carpet City Rotary Club, to the upcoming GRSP convocation in Atlanta.



October 31st Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Bowling, John (JOHN) 6-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Kirkman, Lou Kirkman, Lowell D. 4-Nov  
Richmond, Agnes Richmond, John D. 2-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) 11/1/1977 40  
Barnwell, William L (BILL) 11/1/1972 45  
Campbell, J Carl (CARL) 11/3/2015 2  
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) 11/1/1978 39  
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) 11/1/1989 28  
Morehouse, Gordon C. (GORDON) 11/1/1982 35  
Neal, John P. III(JOHN) 11/1/1980 37  
Pennington, David E. (DAVID) 11/1/1985 32  
Stewart, Robert T (ROBERT) 11/1/1981 36  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


October 24th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Jones, J. Sherwood Jr. (SHERWOOD) 29-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
No Partner birthdays this period.  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Schneller, April D (APRIL) 10/25/2016 1  
Mixer, Mark S (MARK) 10/25/2016 1  
McClure, Douglas E (DOUGLAS) 10/25/2016 1  
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) 10/26/1999 18  
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) 10/27/2015 2  
Aft, David (DAVID) 10/29/1996 21  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) Roger 30-Oct 18


Heifer International

by John Hutcheson

For a program on Heifer International, which our Club has supported financially for several years as part of our international outreach, John Hutcheson introduced one of its most prominent local activists, Dr. Chris Stearns. Dr. Stearns is widely known in the Dalton-Whitfield area, where he has practiced veterinary medicine for more than 32 years, fourteen of which have been at Dalton Animal Care on South Hamilton Street. A 1985 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, he has supported his profession through service on several state and local boards, and he has a strong sense of community involvement, being active on the Dalton Tree Board, the Vestry of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, and the state board for the Alzheimer’s Association. In November he will travel to Ethiopia to assist in research on the endangered red wolf.


Dr. Chris Stearns

Dr. Stearns began by pointing to Heifer International’s fundamental goal, which is the elimination of poverty and hunger by the provision of animals which can help their owners develop self-sufficiency. He noted that each recipient of a Heifer International animal must agree to pass on its first female offspring to someone else in their community, thereby expanding the effectiveness of a single donation.

Heifer International (HI) was founded by Dan West, a Midwestern farmer and member of the Church of the Brethren, in 1937 during the course of the Spanish Civil War. The first shipment of heifers went to Puerto Rico in 1947, and over the seventy years of its existence HI has operated in 125 countries, assisting thirty million families and more than a billion people. Locally, HI has worked through St. Mark’s Episcopal Church as a Christmas project for the congregation’s youth and as a mission trip to HI’s 1,200 acre ranch in Perryville, Arkansas. Visits to the ranch often give urban youth their first experience with animal care and crop cultivation, as well as acquainting them with sustainable solutions to poverty, environmental degradation, and conditions of life typical in much of the world.

In the beginning, HI took animals from the USA to host countries abroad, but now every effort is made to acquire animals in-country, working in partnership with governments in the US and locally. Animals can be purchased through Heifer Markets, and benchmark programs provide specific goals. Financial operations are scrupulously transparent, with 95% of received funds going toward the organization’s work. Such fiscal responsibility is attractive, and recently the Gates Foundation gave HI $45 million. Although it is best known for its work in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, HI also has projects in the US, notably in Appalachia and the Southwest.

Responding to questions, Dr. Stearns reminded members that donations can be in any amount—it’s not necessary to cover the entire cost of an animal—and he displayed a copy of the HI gift catalog from which purchases can be made as tributes in lieu of material gifts.

Announcements

President Kevin Brunson opened the meeting by recognizing Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett, who said that the Club meeting on October 31 will focus on the Paul Harris Fellowships as part of the drive to bring our Club to 100% Paul Harris membership. Smitty also noted that six Rotarians will participate in the Whitfield Education Foundation Celebrity Spelling Bee to be held on November 14; these include Pat Chute, Amy Messick, Chuck Payne, John Richmond, Archana Srivastava, and William Venable. Last year the top four or five spellers were all Rotarians, including the winner, Scott DeLay.

President Kevin reminded members about the program on the Appalachian Regional Port scheduled for October 19 at Dalton State and also about the presentation by the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce of the new Strategic Plan today at 5:30 at City Hall.

 

 

 



Hamilton Medical Center: Poised For Expansion

By John Hutcheson


Sandy McKenzie and Jeff Myers

President Kevin introduced Rotarian Sandy McKenzie, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for Hamilton Health Care System, who welcomed the Club to the HHCS campus and introduced Rotarian Jeff Myers, HHCS President and CEO. While acknowledging that the focus of the program was to be on the new Peeples Cancer Institute, Jeff began with a survey of other projects pending or underway at Hamilton Medical Center. These include a Children’s Care Center which will be formally announced in a few weeks and on which construction should begin soon thereafter; a new 600-space parking structure to be started next month; an urgent care facility in Ringgold near I-75 Exit 348 which will house five sub-specialties and is projected for completion in January, 2018; a similar facility on the Cleveland Road north of Dalton, near the Tractor Supply location; and continued renovation of all patient rooms in the main hospital. In addition, the Gastrointestinal Laboratory will move to the present location of the Bandy Plaza parking area and will more than double in size, enabling it to accommodate six or seven physicians rather than the current three or four. Psychiatric care will expand to meet a growing public need and the arrival of four psychiatrists within the coming year, and arrangements are being made to start a residency program in internal medicine which promises to enhance both the quantity and quality of care in that specialty.

The centerpiece, however, of HHCS’s growth in the near future will be the Peeples Cancer Institute, for which ground was broken on September 21, 2017, with completion projected for the spring of 2019. Its location directly south of the hospital has entailed the permanent closure of Memorial Drive, allowing for creation of a beautifully landscaped space that will become the core and focal point of the HHCS campus. A Certificate of Need for expanded and fully integrated cancer care in the region was approved by State authorities in May, 2015, and as introduced the following October, the Institute’s original concept called for a facility of 38,000 square feet, costing $28,000,000 and housing about eighty employees—twice the existing number of oncology staff. To avoid having to transport patients between the hospital and the Institute by ambulance, or requiring staff to go outside when passing between the buildings, an enclosed connector was added to the design at the first-floor level. This in turn necessitated internal rearrangements which resulted in enlargement of the Institute from three to four stories, increasing its size to 59,000 square feet and the cost to $46,000,000. The fourth story will remain vacant for the time being, leaving plenty of space for future development. The name of the facility honors Shelby and Willena Peeples, whose significant legacy gift helped make the Institute a reality.

Following Jeff’s description of the Institute’s physical features, Sandy McKenzie summarized the programs it will offer. These include radiation oncology, medical oncology, infusion services, women’s imaging, patient navigation/support services, a research component (eventually to be associated with the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University), and clinical services. After brief comments about the qualifications of each of the Oncology Program’s leaders and physicians, Sandy turned to the Institute’s projected economic impact for Whitfield County. It will foster recruitment of the three or four new medical oncology providers needed in this area and will prompt the creation of numerous supporting jobs. Possible expansion into additional clinical areas, such as lung cancer and even open-heart care, could make it a regional referral center for oncology services and lead to still more research and trial programs beyond those presently envisioned.

Whatever the course of the Institute’s future evolution, it will always serve Hamilton Medical Center’s goal to treat the whole patient and Hamilton Health Care System’s adherence to its motto of One Vision, One Institute, One Community.
 

Announcements

President Kevin Brunson opened the meeting with thanks to the Hamilton Health Care System for hosting the meeting in the auditorium of the James Brown Conference Center. He also thanked those who had participated in the renovation work done at the Family Crisis Center on October 7.



October 17th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA SRIVASTAVA) 22-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Ryman, Mary Ryman, Milton J. Jr. 17-Oct  
O'Neill, Lin O'Neill, Michael Paul 19-Oct  
Bowling, Becky Bowling, John 20-Oct  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Winter, Larry E. (LARRY) 10/18/2005 12  
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) 10/21/2008 9  
Caperton, Robert William Jr.(ROBERT) 10/22/2009 8  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


A Visit From The District Governor

By John Hutcheson

Acting in his capacity as Assistant District Governor, Past President Jason returned to the podium to introduce District Governor Cooper. Born in Amarillo, TX, “Coop” still considers himself a Texan despite having spent most of his life in other states such as Missouri, Oklahoma, and Georgia. After attending Oklahoma Christian University on a track scholarship and graduating with a business management degree, he worked in the grocery business, but in 1980 he entered the aerial lift industry, in which he has remained ever since. In 1994 he founded his own company, Premier Platforms, Inc., which now has forty employees and three locations in Georgia. He joined the Rockdale County Rotary Club in 2006 and has since served in most of its offices and many others as well at the District level, where he won the Robert S. Stubbs Guardian of Ethics Award in 2014. A passionate hunter and outdoorsman, he is proud of having harvested an Alaskan trophy moose in 2014. He is married to the former Cheryl Whitehead, who is also a very active Rotarian, and they have two sons and two grandchildren.


District Governor Cooper 

Governor Cooper began by thanking Jason and Kevin for their work as Club presidents and also John Richmond for his services to GRSP. They are examples of “Top Guns of Rotary,” whose power to “Make a Difference” will be the theme of the District Conference in 2018. The conference’s opening session will be held aboard the USS Yorktown at Patriots Point in Charleston Harbor, with an address by a winner of the Medal of Honor.

Noting that RI President Ian Riseley is putting particular emphasis on growing Rotary’s membership, Governor Cooper has asked each club president in District 6910 to personally bring in one new Rotarian during his or her term. As an example, he cited President Kevin, who had recruited Vallarie Pratt, now Club Administration Chair, and she in turn brought in State Senator Chuck Payne.


Award winners

While eradication of polio remains RI’s principal external goal, increased membership holds a comparable standing as its internal goal. For District 6910 the goal for 2017-2018 is a growth of 10%, or 305 new members, and Governor Cooper hopes the Dalton club will net an increase of at least fifteen of these. Currently the District’s growth is first in Zone 34 (Georgia, Florida, and the Caribbean) and sixth in the nation, where it is separated from the first by only six members. “Coop” recognized Alex Brown, our club’s newest member, and personally challenged him to find one more. New members must have “a heart for service,” and once inducted, they should be “engaged and connected” by appointing them to positions and assigning them to particular projects—“Coop” related that shortly after joining Rotary he was asked to help pick up roadside trash on a Saturday morning and found the task unexpectedly fulfilling. He mentioned the usefulness of R.O.C.K.—Rotary’s Own College of Knowledge—a new District program that engages members by asking them to speak about their careers. In this connection he also told about the District’s Speakers’ Bureau; local clubs are encouraged to forward information to it about especially interesting speakers which can then be a resource for clubs looking for program materials.

Pointing out again that “membership drives everything,” Governor Cooper asked everyone present to write his or her name and the name of a good Rotary prospect on a post-it slip; these were collected by the past presidents in attendance. To prompt further engagement, he urged everyone to become a RI Foundation Sustaining Member by contributing at least $100 per year toward the final elimination of polio. He also emphasized RI President Ian’s commitment to environmental improvement by having every local club plant a tree on behalf of each of its members during the period between July 1, 2017 and Earth Day on April 22, 2018. This year’s RI theme is “Making a Difference,” which is supported by District 6910’s stress on Rotarians as “People of Action.” The Governor suggested Club members might ask themselves what Dalton would be like without the Club and, alternatively, what it could be like with a 10% membership increase. The Rotary Club of Dalton can be proud of its impact over the years, and “Coop” challenged it to “go make that difference.”

President Kevin announced that the Club will donate $500 to a charity of Governor Cooper’s choice—he asked that it go to Rotary’s hurricane relief—and the meeting closed with a moment of silence on behalf of the victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting and their families.

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin Brunson opened the meeting by welcoming District 6910 Governor David “Coop” Cooper. He noted that the drive to gather supplies for the Family Crisis Center will end at today’s meeting, but Club members are requested to help with some light renovations at the Crisis Center on October 7, an undertaking in which the Club is partnering with the Walmart Neighborhood Market. Members are also invited to attend a presentation on the Appalachian Regional Port to be held on the Dalton State College campus at 3:00 p.m. on October 19, and Kevin also touched briefly on the District Conference to be held in Charleston, SC, on May 10-13, 2018. Finally, he reminded members that the Club’s October 10 meeting will be held in the James Brown Auditorium at Hamilton Medical Center for a program about oncology and the new cancer treatment center.

Past President Jason Parker recognized Amanda Reed as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow and William Bronson as its most recent Will Watt Fellow, with both awards being presented by District Governor Cooper and President Kevin.


Amanda Reed and William Bronson

Past President and GRSP Trustee John Richmond recognized the Club’s GRSP student, Linnea Neman, as the recipient of this year’s Carlton McCamy Scholarship Award, one of only two such named awards in the entire GRSP operation. Honoring Past President and District Governor McCamy, the award was established in 1994 at the initiative of his law partner, Joe Tuggle, himself a past president of the Club. Such awards require a contribution or bequest of at least $100,000 to the GRSP Foundation.


Linnea Neman



October 10th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr. (PAUL) 11-Oct    
Temples, Coy H (COY) 11-Oct    
McClure, Douglas E (DOUGLAS) 15-Oct    
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) 16-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sponcler, Betty Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr. 11-Oct  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) 10/12/2010 7  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) Sherry 10-Oct 30
Wright, William B. Jr.(WILLIAM) Betty 14-Oct 59


Autism Awareness

Community Service Chair Amy Messick introduced Dwayne Smith, manager of Workout 24/7 in Chatsworth, who miraculously survived a supposedly totally disabling accident to become a professional wrestler, businessman, and passionate advocate for victims of autism.


Dwayne Smith

Dwayne recounted that his accident was in the form of a stroke, after which he was told he would never walk or talk again. He recovered nevertheless and still wrestles occasionally, often to raise support for research into autism.

Using a brief video, Dwayne showed that autism is a neurological disorder of unknown origin. Each case is different, with its own manifestations, but common features include poor or absent communication skills and repetitive behaviors. It can strike in any age group, but it is most frequently associated with children. In the U.S. and Australia, one in 68 children is autistic, and the rate in Europe is 62 in 1,000. Autistic celebrities include the inventor of Pokemon and the performers Cher and Eminem. Research is promoted by an organization called Fighting for Autism, founded 3½ years ago in Australia and now comprising 80,000 members worldwide, while education about the disorder is furthered through Ambassadors for Autism. In Dalton/Whitfield, Dwayne is working to bring kick-boxing therapy from Memphis and to match a donation of $3,000,000 from a local benefactor for construction of a 50,000 sq. ft. Autism Therapy Center, part of a larger goal to have at least one such center in each state.

In a moving conclusion to his presentation, Dwayne related that autism became centrally important to him when his son was diagnosed at age 3½. He had been non-verbal, but last year he told his mother on her birthday that he loved her, and he now has a vocabulary of about twenty words.
 

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin Brunson opened the meeting by congratulating Dalton State College on the celebration of its 50th anniversary. He reminded members about the ongoing drive to gather supplies for the Family Crisis Center, an undertaking in which the Club is also partnering with the Walmart Neighborhood Market. District Governor “Coop” Cooper will visit our Club on October 3 and will meet with the Board at 11:00 a.m. that day. On October 10 the Club will meet in the James Brown Auditorium at Hamilton Medical Center for a program about oncology and the new cancer treatment center.

 



October 3rd Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) 4-Oct    
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) 6-Oct    
Tripp, Larry E. (LARRY) 7-Oct    
Gilreath, Judy Ellen (JUDY) 9-Oct    
Aft, David (DAVID) 9-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sutherland, Phyllis Sutherland, George W. 5-Oct  
Griffin, Brenda Griffin, Ronald L 8-Oct  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Barnett, George S. (SMITTY) 10/6/2015 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) Anna 4-Oct 14
Chute, Patricia M (PAT) Bob 9-Oct 36


Volunteer Opportunity

Please note, the September 26th meeting is the last day to donate to the donation drive for the Crisis Center. As a reminder, the items needed for the drive include shaving cream, feminine hygience products, shampoo and conditioner, Q-tips, bar soap, baby soap, nail polish remover, deoderant, baby wipes, hair care products, wash cloths, towels, twin sheets, pillows, shower curtain liners, and pots and pans. For the hygiene products, please donate in trial size amounts. Donations will also be taken at the Police Services Center at 301 Jones Street until October 6th. 

The Community Service Committee is partnering with one of our newest Rotary members, William Venable, and employees form the Walm
art Neighborhood Market to spend (4) four hours on October 7th volunteering at the Crisis Center. We will be pressure washing and doing some light landscape work from 8:00am to 12:00pm. If you would like to help us with this worthy cause, please let Chris Cooke or Amy Messick know so we can properly plan for equipment and volunteers. 

September 26th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) 2-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
No Partner birthdays this period.  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Sellers, Kathryn Oehler (KATHRYN) 9/27/2011 6  
Kiker, Janice F. (JANICE) 9/30/2014 3  
Jones, Miller T. (MILLER) 9/30/2014 3  
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) 10/1/2013 4  
Griffin, Joseph Bryan (BRYAN) 10/1/2013 4  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Chambliss, Darla P (DARLA) Alex 28-Sep 26
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) Joanie 30-Sep 22


GRSP 2017

by John Hutcheson

Valiantly stepping in at the last moment because of the District Governor’s postponement, Past President John Richmond presented a review and update of the Georgia Rotary Student Program as information for newer Club members and a refresher for those of longer standing.


John Richmond

After introducing Linnéa Neman of Sweden and Clare Ballentine of England—the GRSP students being supported this year by the Dalton and Carpet City Rotary Clubs respectively—John showed a video recounting how GRSP began in 1946 in the aftermath of World War II, when Rotarian William A. Watt of Thomasville initiated a scholarship project to bring international students to Georgia to spend a year with American students and with each other, focusing on their similarities rather than on their cultural or national differences. Will Watt’s desire to “get the politics out” was inspired by hearing a story of the unselfish help a German youth gave an American student during a bicycling accident in pre-war Germany. The video used interviews with some of the sixty GRSP students who attended the 2014 GSRP Conclave in Columbus and several of the program’s Rotarian leaders to demonstrate how the students arrived as “ambassadors” from their homelands and left at the end of their year in the state as ambassadors for Georgia and the United States. No program like GSRP exists anywhere else in the world of Rotary.

By the end of the 2016-2017 school year, GRSP had sponsored more than 3,600 students since its origin. Scholarships are based on the costs of attending public colleges at in-state rates and currently run between $20,000 and $25,000 per student, including tuition, room and board, and books. Funding comes from annual assessments of $7.00 per member in each of the three Georgia Districts, support from club budgets, and members’ discretionary contributions of $25.00 per quarter to the GRSP Endowment. About one-third of the total annual amount is derived from each of these sources, with 85% going to the students and 15% to administrative costs. The Endowment corpus is never touched and presently stands at more than $13,700,000; its earnings are used to supplement contributions from the clubs and thus enable them to redirect their resources toward other youth-oriented programs. Currently the Endowment’s annual support stands at $5,250 per student. Although the students live on their campuses, each one is adopted by a host family so that they are immersed fully in the everyday culture of their local communities as well as in their academic environments.

GRSP is coordinated from an office in Savannah and typically receives 200 to 250 applications each year from around the world, with about 50 to 55 usually accepted. Historically most students have come from Europe, but efforts are underway to inform Rotary clubs in Asia, Africa, and Latin America of GRSP’s existence and to promote applications from those areas. In 2017-2018, there are 45 students enrolled, including 31 females and 14 males, who will attend 22 participating colleges with support from 113 Rotary clubs across the state. District 6910 has 16 students, receiving support from 55 clubs.

Locally, the Dalton club has contributed nearly $275,000 to GRSP over the years, and it administers the Carlton McCamy Scholarship, named in honor of a District Governor from our club who bequeathed $100,000 to GRSP in his will—there are only two other such club scholarships in the state. Rotarians who contribute at least $1,000 to GRSP are eligible for recognition as Will Watt Fellows; similar named fellowships are available at the $2,500, $5,000, $7,500, and $10,000 levels. Joined by Past President and long-time GRSP worker Bill Bowen, John ended the program by appealing for volunteers to assist in transporting, entertaining, and generally welcoming our current GRSP students, and he reminded the Club that a GRSP cookbook is now for sale, containing an international collection of recipes provided by members of the last three GRSP classes. Copies are $20 apiece, and the cost can be applied toward qualifying for a Paul Harris Fellowship.
 

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin Brunson announced that tropical storm conditions in the wake of Hurricane Irma caused District Governor David “Coop” Cooper to postpone his visit originally scheduled for today’s meeting until October 3. For the same reason, the United Way kickoff scheduled for yesterday evening will take place next week on September 19; Club members are encouraged to attend as the regular meeting that day will be replaced by a Rotary R & R event. On September 26 Dwayne Smith will present a program about autism.

Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead reminded members that Kroger will provide flu immunization shots at the September 26 meeting, for which a sign-up sheet is on the badge table. Rotarian Chris Cooke noted that the Family Crisis Center supply drive will be deferred until October in view of the need to provide support for victims of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

President Kevin presented a check from the Club for $1,866 to President-Elect Greg Dent and Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett, who will head up an initiative in partnership with Georgia Northwestern Technical College to encourage GED completion.


Kevin Brunson, Greg Dent, and Smitty Barnett

In the absence of Membership Chair Cherri Robertson, Frank Hogshead presided over the induction of two new members of the Club, Alex Brown, sponsored by Kevin Brunson, and William Venable, sponsored by Chris Cooke.


Alex Brown and William Venable

 



September 19th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) 22-Sep    
Pennington, David E. (DAVID) 22-Sep    
Williams, Roger (ROGER) 22-Sep    
Cooke, Christopher M (CHRIS) 24-Sep    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Payne, Angelina Payne, Charles F Jr 22-Sep  
Parker, April Parker, Hoyt Jason 24-Sep  
Mixer, Kimberly Mixer, Mark S 25-Sep  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
McKenzie, Sandra D (SANDY) 9/20/2016 1  
Chute, Patricia M (PAT) 9/20/2016 1  
Brantley, Valerie K (VAL) 9/20/2016 1  
Creswell, Catrina Celeste (CELESTE) 9/20/2016 1  
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) 9/20/2011 6  
Scott, William M. (WILL) 9/23/2014 3  
Tripp, Larry E. (LARRY) 9/23/2014 3  
Boyett, William T (BILLY) 9/24/2013 4  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Kiker, Janice F. (JANICE) John 23-Sep 56


September 12th Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) 5-Sep    
Myers, Jeffrey Donald (JEFFREY) 7-Sep    
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) 7-Sep    
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) 8-Sep    
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) 8-Sep    
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) 9-Sep    
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr. (ROY) 10-Sep    
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) 12-Sep    
Gazaway, Kristie (KRISTIE) 14-Sep    
Minor, John Thomas V (JOHN) 15-Sep    
Boyett, William T (BILLY) 16-Sep    
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) 17-Sep    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Pennington, Pamela Pennington, David E. 6-Sep  
Adamson, Zach Adamson, Anna Y 10-Sep  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Townsend, Patrick J. (PAT) Teresa 10-Sep 40
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) Julie 12-Sep 46
Little, William Norris Sr.(NORRIS) Billie 13-Sep 64
Bowen, William C. III(BILL) Ann 14-Sep 43
Gazaway, Kristie (KRISTIE) Johnnie 17-Sep 23
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) Allen 17-Sep 50


Meet Linnea Neman: GRSP Student 2017-18


By John Hutcheson


Linnea Neman

Rotarian Zach Taylor introduced Linnéa Neman of Sweden, for whom the Taylors are serving as host family. Linnéa, or Linney, began by saying that although she carries a Swedish passport, she doesn’t really feel Swedish and dislikes national labels. She was born on June 16, 1997 in Luxembourg, where she lived for eight years and attended an international school where instruction was in French. She has two brothers, Eric, who is two years younger than she, and Axel, who is four years younger. When she was eight her family moved to Switzerland because of her father’s job and lived in Zurich—her favorite city—for the next nine years. She’s now twenty, but completion of her education has been delayed because she had to repeat a grade each time her family moved. Although her mother was a stay-at-home-mom for twenty years, both of her parents now work for banks. Her mother, Maria, is Swedish, as is her father, Peter, who was born in Malmö and grew up in the southernmost town in Sweden. They married in 1995. The family is very close, and they enjoy outdoor activities in both winter and summer—skiing, hiking, watersports, etc. At home they speak Swedish and moved to Sweden in 2014 after previously spending two or three months there each year. The country is about three times the size of Georgia, with a population of ten million. Linney’s family lives in Båstad/Torekov, in southern Sweden; Torekov is a fishing village of 800, well-known in Sweden as a summer resort, and Båstad was put on the map by tennis—since 1948 it has been the site of the Swedish Open tennis tournament. There are two Rotary clubs, and the newer one, founded in 2015, is sponsoring Linney.

Linney loves skiing and sailing, and in school she played soccer and tennis. Her educational focus is on science, but she is unsure of her future plans. She loves to travel and speaks five languages—Swedish, German, English, French, and Spanish. She thought about becoming a pediatrician, but her love for travel is inclining her toward business. During her year in America she hopes to better know both the United States and herself—it will be her first time away from her family. She is honored to be here and grateful to Rotary for the opportunity.

Announcements and Recognitions

Substituting for President Kevin Brunson, Past President David Aft called on Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead to present the Club budget for FY 2018, previously approved by the Club board. Although projected revenue of $155,400 is exceeded by anticipated expenses of $158,700, Frank believes the year will nevertheless end with a surplus. On a motion made and seconded by several members, the budget was adopted unanimously by voice vote.

Frank reminded members that Kroger will provide flu immunization shots at the September 26 meeting, for which a sign-up sheet is on the badge table. David noted that the Family Crisis Center supply drive will begin in September. There will be no meeting on September 5 because of the closure of the Country Club that day. The District Governor will join us on September 12, and the United Way kick-off will take place that evening.

Past President John Richmond brought a check for $5,258 as a refund from the GRSP office for overcharges due to the difference between the amount allocated for our GRSP student’s tuition at Dalton State College last year and the actual amount charged by the College—a striking testimony to the affordability of DSC. In October John will present a program about the GRSP Foundation, and he informed the Club that a GRSP cookbook is now available, containing an international collection of recipes provided by members of the last three GRSP classes. Copies are $20 apiece, and the cost can be applied toward qualifying for a Paul Harris Fellowship.



September 5th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) 5-Sep    
Myers, Jeffrey Donald (JEFFREY) 7-Sep    
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) 7-Sep    
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) 8-Sep    
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) 8-Sep    
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) 9-Sep    
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr. (ROY) 10-Sep    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Pennington, Pamela Pennington, David E. 6-Sep  
Adamson, Zach Adamson, Anna Y 10-Sep  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Townsend, Patrick J. (PAT) Teresa 10-Sep 40


Early Cognitive Development and the Readers to Leaders Program


by Zach Taylor and John Hutcheson

Rotarian Zach Taylor began by speaking about early childhood development and the importance of language acquisition by 24 months of age. Children growing up in households with college educated parents with higher incomes hear 30 million more words on average than children growing up in households where the parents are on welfare. This word gap translates into less vocabulary development by age 3. There is a predictable cascade that follows. Vocabulary determines ability to read at level in the 3rd grade, which predicts academic achievement, which predicts economic level in adulthood. This is also a health issue, as better educated people tend to be healthier than less educated people. The importance of the human interaction with infants and toddlers was emphasized, including talking with babies and reading to children at an early age. Television, iPads, and other electronic media are not a substitute for the human-to-baby interaction that occurs with parents, family members and other care givers.


Zach Taylor

[Insert President-elect Greg Dent spoke briefly about the North Georgia Healthcare Partnership and then introduced Stephanie Hogshead, who described their initiative in the community, Readers to Leaders. Readers to Leaders is a long term workforce development strategy to create a pipeline of well-prepared, educated talent. The effort was created after area employers voiced difficulties in finding qualified employees despite the area's aggressive unemployment rate. Through the support of the University of Georgia's Archway Partnership and the AmeriCorps VISTA program, Readers to Leaders has grown from a simple declaration to a maturing literacy effort.

  • Examples of their work include:
  • Power Lunches, a free book distribution and reading program at summer USDA feeding sites to mitigate loss of learning from "summer slide".
  • Book Nooks, 21 fully stocked free-standing bookcases placed in public gathering places throughout Dalton and Whitfield County.
  • A book distribution program implemented through area pediatrician offices where parents receive free books and instruction on developmental milestones to look for during well-child visits.
  • Saturday Academy, a school readiness program that simulates a pre-school classroom for families on Saturday mornings.
  • Ms. Frizzle School Visits, a volunteer-staffed effort in which Ms. Frizzle from the Magic School Bus book series visits local schools to share science education literacy programming.
  • Pre-K Registration, at which Readers to Leaders provides every child with a book and a fun literacy-themed reading area.

Greg Dent and Stephanie Hogshead


August 28th 2017 Birthdays and Anniversaries

Member Birthdays Birthday    
Cope, Don (DON) 1-Sep    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Hutcheson, Marilyn Hutcheson, John A. Jr. 2-Sep  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Goodroe, Robert S. (ROBERT) 9/1/1964 53  
Sanders, Drayton M II(DRAYTON) 9/1/1979 38  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


Georgia Film Industry


By John Hutcheson

Noting that film-making and its ancillaries have become a major industry in Georgia, Rotarian Kathryn Sellers introduced Dalton native Mark Hannah, who became interested in movie production while in his teens and has since made it his life’s work. Mark is also the author of the popular “Town Crier” column which appears in each Sunday’s edition of the Dalton Citizen-News.


Mark Hannah

Mark began by telling how as teenagers he and his friends filmed home-made horror movies in their backyards on Super-88 mm film, eventually attracting modest financial support from the Creative Arts Guild. Some of those who joined him in the early days now work in Los Angeles, in New York, in advertising, or in feature film production. His own work has remained based in Dalton, focusing on corporate videos, but he has also assisted in producing several large-scale features for which significant shooting took place in the Dalton area. The first of these, made in the 1980’s, was From a Whisper to a Scream, starring Vincent Price (who never actually came to Dalton), and the 1990’s brought Island Girl, followed by Knuckle Sandwich and several other features. A project called Camera Ready searches for unique local features for use in location shots, and currently a film code-named “Fathom” and budgeted at $200 million, with a crew of 140, is being partially shot here, using the tunnel at Tunnel Hill.

In 2016 over one hundred major features were filmed in Georgia—the most in the world, exceeding even those made in the United Kingdom or Los Angeles. The biggest studio in Georgia, located just south of Atlanta, is a satellite of Pinewood Studios, the UK’s largest film producer. Georgia’s greatest attraction for film producers is a highly attractive array of tax rebates, which in 2016 totaled more than $600,000,000. Although this represented a large sacrifice of potential revenue for the state, film production generated $2.2 billion in taxes paid by Georgia businesses supplying necessary goods and services; one recent estimate of this trickle-through money approaches $7 billion. A local example of a beneficiary is Myers Carpet Company, which has become a major supplier of floor-covering used in building sets. Much of this is recycled and sold to the public at a discount after filming is completed. In addition to tax incentives, Georgia has far less bureaucracy and red tape for film-makers to cope with than California or other film centers; permits and security, for example, are much more easily arranged. Moreover, film production generates “clean money”—with little or no lasting pollution, it has a minimal impact on the physical environment.

Movie-making can also stimulate tourism, especially if a film does well at the box office or even if its subject simply has high public recognition. In this context, the most famous movie filmed in Georgia was not Gone With the Wind, which was made entirely in California, but Deliverance, followed by Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil—the latter having far greater tourism power given the attraction and accessibility of Savannah in contrast to the mountains of Northeast Georgia.

A Rotary Minute with Dalton Fire Chief Todd Pangle

Rotarian Todd Pangle is the son of Pete and Paula Pangle, and he and his wife Belinda have a 21-year- old son, Preston, who is studying weather science at the University of Alabama. After working for several years in his father’s auto body shop, he joined the Dalton Fire Department in 1987, rising through the ranks until he was appointed Chief in 2017, succeeding Dalton Rotary Club Past President Bruce Satterfield. From 2002 until 2013 he also worked extensively with the youth program in his church.


Todd Pangle

Announcements and Recognitions

In the wake of the recent disorders in Charlottesville, Virginia, at the suggestion of Past President David Aft and with the approval of the Board of Directors, President-Elect Greg Dent presented the following resolution on the Club’s behalf:

Whereas the Dalton Rotary Club exists as an organization committed to service above self - in practice, in faith and in our interactions with others, and

Whereas the Dalton Rotary Club remains committed to finding peaceful solutions to the challenges facing our communities, whether they be local, national or international, and

Whereas the Dalton Rotary Club affirms that organizations who advocate for violence, discrimination and hatred fail to meet all aspects of the Rotary Four-Way test, and further acknowledges that such groups exist as a direct threat to the civic and humanitarian aspirations of our community and the world community of Rotary,

Be it hereby resolved that the Dalton Rotary Club strongly condemns the violent actions of the extremists involved in Charlottesville, VA and will stand with those who advocate for peaceful and practical solutions and stand against those who wish to undermine our nation and its commitment to equality and the common good.


Greg Dent

President Kevin related that he and Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett attended the District 6910 University at Lanier Technical College on August 12, where they went to breakout sessions about the Rotary Foundation to learn more about how to achieve 100% Paul Harris Fellowship status for club members. President Kevin also directed members’ attention to a flyer listing needed donations for the Family Crisis Center. Finally, he awarded Blue Badges to Rotarians Shell Underwood and Mark Mixer.


Shell Underwood and Mark Mixer



August 22nd Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) 25-Aug    
Jones, J Sherwood III (SHERWOOD) 26-Aug    
Farrow, Stephen B (STEVE) 26-Aug    
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) 27-Aug    
Morehouse, Gordon C. (GORDON) 27-Aug    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Aft, Pauline Aft, David 27-Aug  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) Mary Ann 23-Aug 42
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) Carolyn 26-Aug 51
Bowling, John (JOHN) Becky 27-Aug 51


Four Way Test 2017




Four Way Test


Image



2017 High School Football Preview


by John Hutcheson

Rotarian and former Dalton High School Head Football Coach Ronnie McClurg opened the 2017 pre-season survey of local high school football prospects by introducing the coaches from Christian Heritage High, Coahulla Creek High, Dalton High, Northwest Whitfield High, and Southeast Whitfield High, and he urged everyone to support their favorite team.


Ronnie McClurg

From Christian Heritage, Athletic Director Chad Jordan spoke on behalf of Head Coach Jay Poag who was taking his son to enroll at Kenyon College. This year the Christian Heritage team will field about forty players, a remarkably high number since the school’s entire 9-12 student body totals only 154. It’s a young team, with seven seniors, six juniors, and the rest sophomores or freshmen. Returning starters include four on defense and five on offense, so many players will need to play on both sides of the ball, and there is also a new kicker. Although the team lacks experience, they will do what they have to do to be competitive, and they will always remember that it’s not who you play, but how you play.

Coach Caleb Bagley of Coahulla Creek is in his first year as head coach and also has a young team. With seven new staff members as well, he is treating the year as though it were a brand-new program. Of sixty players, only four are seniors (two of whom haven’t played in three years) and 27 are sophomores. The offense will be based on a running game, while the defense will be predicated on movement before and after the snap. The final starting line-up will be decided after this week’s scrimmage against Fannin County.

Coach Matt Land of Dalton High described his 2017 team with a phrase from Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities—it’s facing both the best of times and the worst of times. Much of the momentum remains from last year, notwithstanding that season’s severely disappointing end and the graduation of 27 seniors, including 18 starters. Land and his staff have advised the squad to enjoy this year and be prepared to go all the way in 2018. In the meantime, the defense, having graduated nine seniors, will need to start several sophomores, an unusual situation. The offense graduated eight starters and the new running backs haven’t yet been identified—here again it may be necessary to use sophomore starters, perhaps as many as three or four. Dalton’s greatest strength will be in its kicking game since the team’s kicker has been ranked as the 4th best in the country, with an average kick of 48 yards. Overall, this year will be a test by fire, and the main goal will be to win the regional championship—anything beyond that will be extra. In any event, the Dalton High staff never forgets that their most important task is to raise young men rather than simply to win games. To that end, the key idea to be imparted to the team in 2017 will be that of civility, meaning respect, not merely agreement, extended to each other and to their opponents.

From Northwest Whitfield, Coach Josh Robinson related that things are going well, and he predicts a good season for the Bruins. While last year’s defense was disappointing, he believes this year will be better, with six seniors on the defensive line, which will be more physical than in the past and will be backed up by two good players in the secondary. On offense, play will revolve around Luke Chitwood, a truly superb quarterback, and the offensive line has four returning senior starters, as is the kicker also.

At Southeast Whitfield, Coach Sean Gray’s coaching philosophy is to concentrate on positives and to draw inspiration for his squad from the state championship won by Southeast’s soccer team as well as from the Raiders’ recent successes—last year they accomplished three shut-outs, the most since 1984. Reviewing his list of exceptional players, he noted that many of them are unusually tall and intelligent. The school’s training and playing facilities are excellent by any standard, this year featuring a new scoreboard and clock.

Coach McClurg concluded the program by paying tribute to the talent and commitment each of the coaches brings to his program and to the friendships between them, providing the community with fine examples of sportsmanship as well as a high caliber of football.

Special Recognitions

President Kevin welcomed members of the Dalton Kiwanis Club, who were joining us for the annual high school football preview. Rotarian Zach Taylor introduced this year’s GRSP students, Linnea Nemean of Sweden, sponsored by the Dalton Rotary Club, and Clare Ballentine of England, sponsored by the Carpet City Rotary Club. Rotarian Rob Bradham introduced Representative Tom Graves, who is visiting Dalton during the Congressional recess.



August 15th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) 16-Aug    
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) 16-Aug    
Ryman, Milton J. Jr. (MILTON) 16-Aug    
Tatum, Laurice A. (LAURICE) 18-Aug    
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) 18-Aug    
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) 18-Aug    
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) 19-Aug    
Jones, Miller T. (MILLER) 19-Aug    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Scott, Annelle Scott, Trammell 15-Aug  
Robertson, Ricky Robertson, Cherri L 16-Aug  
Blackman, Bill Blackman, Linda T. 18-Aug  
Turner, Carolyn Turner, Henry J 20-Aug  
Dobbins, Donna Dobbins, Chuck 20-Aug  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Chambliss, Darla P (DARLA) 8/18/2015 2  
Minter, B. Scott (SCOTT) 8/18/2015 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Sanders, Drayton M II(DRAYTON) Mary Etta 16-Aug 59
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) Ben 19-Aug 45


Dalton's GreenHouse


by John Hutcheson

Smitty Barnett introduced Natima Walker, Executive Director of the GreenHouse, a child advocacy and sexual assault center which, along with the Family Crisis Center and the Miracle Field, is one of this year’s partner agencies with the Rotary Club of Dalton. Natima, a Rotarian herself and the mother of a two-year-old son, began her presentation with a short video which gave startling statistics about local levels of child and sexual abuse—last year, for example, there were 2,740 child abuse victims in Whitfield County alone. A Child Advocacy Center such as the GreenHouse provides a child-friendly, neutral, safe place for children who have disclosed abuse and for their non-offending family members. The largest victim demographic is that of girls ages six to twelve, with the most common offenders being white men.


Natima Walker

The GreenHouse was founded by Rotarian Jack Partain during his tenure as Conasauga Circuit District Attorney and now has a trained staff of five. Its services include three principal components: forensic interviews to gather information from children about alleged abuse, advocacy to connect victims and their families to needed resources, and no-cost therapy by qualified professionals to enable clients to regain a sense of control after trauma. Typically the GreenHouse is involved by law enforcement or the Department of Family and Children Services (DFACS) when a child discloses abuse. Every effort is made to avoid subjecting children to multiple interviews with law enforcers, therapists, etc., which can often be as traumatic, if not more so, for the victim than the abuse itself as well as producing inconsistent accounts from one time to another. Services are also available to adults, especially those with special needs such as delayed cognitive development. GreenHouse staff members adhere to the highest professional standards, using a Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) model which requires involvement by seven disciplines, i.e., DFCS workers, law enforcement, assistant district attorneys, nurses, mental health workers, forensic interviewers, and the juvenile justice court.

The need for the GreenHouse’s services is growing, partly from a greater willingness by victims to disclose abuse, which in turn may reflect expanded support from schools and other agencies. In 2015 the GreenHouse conducted 145 forensic interviews, from which 45 clients entered therapy, and in 2016 these numbers were 173 and 75 respectively. With a projected average increase of 20% to 25% per year, 2017 is likely to see at least 200 forensic interviews. The GreenHouse is a United Way 501c3 agency, funded by donors, accrediting agencies, and limited municipal support. Upcoming events include a tennis tournament and the annual Phantom Fundraiser (a direct solicitation of contributions in lieu of holding a formal social function). All monies remain in the service area since there are no outside organizations to support.

The GreenHouse is located in an actual house at 600 E. Morris Street which was donated by Mohawk Industries; although the agency’s work is clinical, its setting is intentionallynon-clinical. While the present location is satisfactory, a new facility there is to be greatly desired; this would provide spaces for medical examinations and expanded therapy services which cannot now be accommodated even with an addition to the existing structure. The staff will host a conference on human trafficking this fall, and plans are underway to launch a major educational initiative, ideally through the schools.

A growing body of research shows that many social problems, such as addictions, mental illness, and a wide range of criminality, can be traced to childhood trauma. Dalton is fortunate to have a child advocacy center of the caliber of the GreenHouse; many areas of Georgia have only rudimentary services, if any, of this kind, and some states, such as Florida, have none at all.

A Rotary Minute with Amy Messick

Community Service Chair Amy Messick has been marketing manager with Adhesive Technologies since 2015, after previously working as production manager for Niche Graphic Flooring. Although she started her career in 2002 as a worker on the plant floor and now holds five U.S. patents, she sees her greatest accomplishments as being mother to four boys and a servant for Jesus Christ.

Announcements and Recognitions

President Kevin reminded the Club that on August 8, the program will be the high school football coaches’ annual season preview, for which the Dalton Kiwanis Club will be joining us.

Rotarian Brian Griffin was recognized as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow, receiving his award from Foundation Chair Smitty Barnett.


Brian Griffin



August 8th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Adcock, Don W. (DON) 8-Aug    
Minter, B. Scott (SCOTT) 10-Aug    
Reed, Amanda (AMANDA) 11-Aug    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Satterfield, Kayanne Satterfield, Bruce A. 9-Aug  
Smith, Sandra Smith, Ralph 11-Aug  
Laugahter, Ben Laughter, R Lynette 11-Aug  
Johnson, Kathy Johnson, Larry Alan 13-Aug  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) Gretchen 8-Aug 31
Barnett, George S. (SMITTY) Tammy 10-Aug 32
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) Judy 14-Aug 46


Domestic Violence Court


By Kathryn Sellers

Judge Cindy Morris, who been on the Superior Court since 2002, Attorney Susan Beck who has been with the District Attorney’s office for ten years, and Jim Sneary who is the Coordinator for the RESOLVE Project, a certified Family Violence Intervention Program, were introduced by Rotarian Celeste Creswell.

Judge Morris stated that a CDC study found that of over ten thousand female homicides between 2003 and 2014, over 55 percent were a result of domestic violence. Ninety three percent were killed by current or former intimate partners: boyfriends, husbands, and lovers. Mass shootings (four or more fatally shot) often involve domestic violence. Many could have been alleviated by some intervention. Still, the courts realized that what they were doing wasn’t working. They had to change their methods of intervening in the early eighties. The courts have now provided both advocates for victims and investigations to find the truths involved.

In Whitfield County in May 2011, an accountability partnership was created with law enforcement (police and sheriff departments), probation, drug court, mental health, DA office, and judges. They are the only court in the state that deals with both felonies and misdemeanors. Both male and female defendants are involved, but the males are the majority. In 2014 their monthly meetings increased to bi-weekly and the domestic violence court became mandatory – not a choice. Most perpetrators are sentenced to a 12-month RESOLVE program for accountability where they learn to avoid offenses. Compliance is essential to the program, so they also deal with alcohol and drug issues, partnering with the Drug Court. In the program, participants also learn to read and get a GED. Judge Morris stated that the program’s goal is to help these people get along with family, neighbors and work associates. “We just want to put people back on the right track.”

Susan Beck spoke about the lack of accurate reporting of injuries and incident facts, although 911 calls and officer video cams often provide accurate evidence. There is an advocate and a dedicated investigator to interview every defendant, to provide services, and to provide information for other professionals involved in the case. If not prosecuted, after the “honeymoon” or the time of the cooling down, the violence cycle starts again. The RESOLVE program is not an alternative like the Drug Court but is mandatory to avoid repetition of offenses.

Jim Sneary stated that our community is creative, offering these exceptional services. The RESOLVE program is 24 – 26 weeks long, creating what some call “therapeutic jurisprudence.” But he says this is accountability and is an educational process, not therapeutic, where they look at their own behavior and choices and see the consequences. The purpose is to make changes in this behavior.

What can we do to help? Judge Morris suggested that we can talk with our legislators to have this program included in the accountability court funding along with the Drug Court. With more funds they could enlarge the program and provide more services.

Announcements and Recognitions

The Family Crisis Center needs board members and youth volunteers. Rotarians are encouraged to consider this.

On August 8, the program will be the high school football coaches and the Kiwanis Club will be joining us.

Greg Dent was installed as the President Elect. Scott DeLay moved from blue badge to the permanent red badge.



August 1st Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
McDonald, David L (DAVID) 2-Aug    
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) 2-Aug    
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) 2-Aug    
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) 7-Aug    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Robertson, Cherri Robertson, Ricky N 2-Aug  
Chandler, Susan Chandler, Robert M. 4-Aug  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Didier, John M. (JOHN) 8/1/1994 23  
Kelehear, Leon S. (SPARKY) 8/1/1988 29  
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) 8/1/1967 50  
Underwood, Michelle (SHELL) 8/2/2016 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Bronson, William III(WILLIAM) Erica 5-Aug 22
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) Bennieta 6-Aug 62
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) Lamar 7-Aug 52


A Visit From The Civil Air Patrol


by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Scott Minter prefaced a presentation on the Civil Air Patrol and its local squadron, saying he had known little about the organization until his daughter became interested in it and greatly enjoyed her experience there. He then introduced Lt. Brian Givens and his nephew, Flight Lt. Officer Joseph Givens who is also an EMT and serves as a medic with the Air National Guard, stationed in Calhoun. Flight Lt. Officer Givens spoke on behalf of Squadron Leader Eric Rochelle, whose CAP obligations precluded his attendance.


Joseph Givens

Beginning during World War II as a civilian extension of the National Guard to strengthen the country’s coastal defenses, particularly against enemy submarine activity, today the CAP is classified as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, including nearly 1,500 squadrons and more than 60,000 volunteers in all 50 states. National Headquarters are at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, but while the CAP is an auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and uses military customs and organization, it is not part of the official military establishment.

The CAP has three basic missions: emergency services, aerospace education, and cadet programs. Its emergency services conduct 90% of inland search and rescue missions in the U.S. as tasked by the Air Force and other agencies, saving an average of 80 lives per year. CAP aerospace education programs provide a wide range of resources for all educational levels in classroom, conference, and online settings, along with support for grants, awards, and scholarships. The cadet programs include more than 25,000 members from ages 12 to 20 and concentrate on the four main areas of leadership, aerospace science, fitness, and character development.

The local squadron serves Whitfield and Murray Counties and is now about two years old, with a membership of 19 seniors and 21 cadets—many of the adults being military veterans who delight in passing on their knowledge. Weekly meetings are held on Tuesday nights at the Dalton National Guard Armory. Annual membership dues are $60 for adults, who must pass an FBI background check, and $30 for members under age 18. Aircraft are based at Ellijay and Kennesaw, and there are many opportunities for flying. Planes may be rented to licensed pilots, and gliders are available as well. Extensive training is also provided in ground activities, especially rescue work.

With offerings available to virtually all ages, participation in the CAP is an excellent way to learn new skills, develop leadership abilities, and serve the country and the local community.

Some Musically Meaningful Beginnings

In addition to their usual recognition of visiting Rotarians and notices of birthdays, anniversaries, and make-ups, each month’s Sergeant-at-Arms is expected to offer a joke or anecdote to set the weekly meeting off on a congenial course. For the meetings of July 11 and July 18, however, Community Service Chair Amy Messick fulfilled this by relating the stories behind “Amazing Grace” and “The Star-Spangled Banner” respectively, gracing the former with a solo in her beautiful soprano voice and the latter by leading everyone present in singing the National Anthem. Special thanks are due to Amy for sharing her musical gift with the Club and her moving accounts of how these songs came to be.

A Rotary Minute with State Senator Chuck Payne

State Senator Chuck Payne related how he wanted to become a Rotarian after reading the Rotary Pledge and realizing that its ideals were the same as those which have guided him all his life. Following service in the U.S. Army, Chuck worked for thirty years in the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice. He and his wife have two children, Heather, 27, and Chas, 20, and he moved to Dalton after his parents settled here. In 2017 he was elected to fill the vacancy in the State Senate created by the appointment of former Senator Charles Bethel to the Georgia Court of Appeals.

Announcements and Recognitions

Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead announced that the pharmacy at the Walnut Avenue Kroger has offered to provide flu and pneumonia shots for Club members on September 26, if at least forty or fifty persons sign up to receive them Past President John Richmond presented a banner from the Rotary Club of Winchester, England, on behalf of Torrin Hoynes, a former GRSP student sponsored by the Dalton Rotary Club. He noted that this year’s two students—one from England to be sponsored by the Carpet City Rotary Club and the other from Sweden to be sponsored by the Dalton Club—will arrive in Dalton in late July and early August. Rotarian Dan Combs recounted a recent visit to Oslo, where he had lunch with a Norwegian student whose GRSP year was supported by the Dalton Club.

Rotarian David Pennington IV, President of the Carpet City Rotary Club, was recognized as a new Paul Harris Fellow. The presentation was made by his father, David Pennington III, a member of the Dalton Club, and witnessed by his aunt, Mary Thelma Norris, a member of the Carpet City Club and former Assistant Governor for District 6910. The Carpet City Club now has a membership of 100% Paul Harris Fellows.


 



July 25th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
O'Neill, Michael Paul (MIKE) 29-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
No Partner birthdays this period.  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Woodward, Philip F. (PHIL) 7/28/2015 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) Virginia 28-Jul 61
Barnwell, William L (BILL) Delle 28-Jul 55
Temples, Coy H (COY) Noel 30-Jul 50


The Year Ahead


By John Hutcheson

President Kevin began his remarks with a description of newly installed RI president Ian Risley, an Australian accountant and Rotarian since 1978 who, among many other accomplishments, has won the Australian Peace Builder’s Award and a Regional Service Award from RI for his work against polio. President Kevin also noted that the new District 6910 Governor is David “Coop” Cooper from the Rotary Club of Rockdale County, who will visit our Club on September 12.


President Kevin

For the 2017-2018 year President Kevin listed several priorities at both the District and the Club levels. Heading the list in each of these contexts is membership growth by at least 10%, and in accordance with the wish of RI President Ian, who seeks to live organically, a tree is to be planted for each new member gained during the coming year. District 6910 will strive to become the highest in the world for the percentage of its members contributing to the Rotary Foundation and will work to achieve Presidential citations. A fundamental goal is to have fun while making a difference, and in that light President Kevin reminded members of the District 6910 conference scheduled for May 10-13, 2018, in Charleston, SC, and the RI Annual Conference to be held in Toronto, Canada, on June 27-27, 2018.

Coming closer to home, President Kevin introduced the Board members for 2017-2018 and stated our club’s goals for the coming year. These include a review of the Club’s Vision Statement, Mission Statement, and By-Laws to assure their alignment with RI policies; increasing our numbers and diversity by adding a minimum of ten new members; developing a Strategic Plan to become a 100% Paul Harris Fellows club as soon as possible; and focusing more intentionally on attendance and make-ups. At the same time, the Club will increase its exposure in local and social media and identify new community service projects to be pursued in partnership with local agencies—an example is the cooperative arrangement between the Club and Georgia Northwestern Technical College by which Rotarians offset testing costs for GED candidates. The Club will, of course, continue its normal service activities—the track meet, golf tournament, fifth grade recognition, and scholarships for outstanding high school students. President Kevin strongly encouraged every member to become personally involved in at least one kind of Club project, and he pledged a continuation of quality weekly programs to keep members informed of these and other service opportunities. He concluded by reading President Ian’s July message to Rotarians around the world.


2017-18 Rotary Board

Announcements and Recognitions

Past President Bill Bowen was recognized with a special award for his many years of work coordinating the Club’s participation in the GRSP program, and Blue Badges were presented to Rotarians Todd Pangle and Kristie Gazaway.



July 18th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Hutcheson, John A. Jr. (JOHN) 18-Jul    
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) 20-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Tharpe, Julie Tharpe, Henry C. 22-Jul  
Bundros, Laura Bundros, Thomas A 22-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) 7/19/2016 1  
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) 7/19/2016 1  
Cooke, Christopher M (CHRIS) 7/19/2016 1  
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) 7/19/2016 1  
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) 7/19/2016 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA SRIVASTAVA) Vinai 20-Jul 41
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) Carla 21-Jul 16
Schneller, April D (APRIL) Douglas 23-Jul 23


Passing the Gavel 2017


By John Hutcheson

President Bruce focused his final presidential remarks on observations about having attended the RI Convention in Atlanta from June 10 to June 14. More than 40,000 Rotarians from 178 countries were present, and it was easy to strike up conversations with Rotarians from around the world—President Bruce had some especially enjoyable exchanges with attendees from Uganda. Because of the crowd’s size, two opening ceremonies were necessary, one live and one by remote transmission. Bill Gates spoke on Monday, June 12, pointing out that the Gates Foundation has matched Rotary in the effort to eradicate polio. Although its original grant terminated in 2017, the Foundation will extend its support for another three years, to 2020, and RI has pledged an additional $50 million from its resources during this period. Today there are five known cases—two in Afghanistan, two in Pakistan, and one in Nigeria—and while vaccination still faces some political or religious opposition, there are more than 200 detection centers in these countries. To make up a $1.5 billion shortfall in anti-polio funding, the European Union has pledged $60 million, and large pledges have also come from the United States, Pakistan, Germany, the United Arab Emirates, Japan, and Canada.

President Bruce also reported on a session concerning human trafficking. Forty-six million people are known to be living in slavery, many of whom are children subject to sexual exploitation. One speaker was actor and entrepreneur Ashton Kutcher, who founded “Thorn: Digital Defenders of Children” in 2009 to combat child sexual abuse; another was Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee, who has worked to get Congressional support for such efforts. The session also heard from Rebecca Bender, a victim of human trafficking who was held captive for seven years before escaping and has since trained more than 26,000 law enforcement officers to deal with this problem, and also from Andrew Young and the CEO of Coca-Cola.

The Atlanta RI Convention dramatically demonstrated that Rotary is a truly impressive worldwide network and that everyone working together will truly accomplish more and make a real difference, not only in the life of the community but in members’ individual lives as well. Next year’s convention will be in Toronto, and President Bruce expressed a hope that some Dalton Rotarians might be able to attend.

President Bruce concluded by thanking the Club for the support he received during the past year, and he individually recognized each member of the Board. He was gratified that during 2017 the Club maintained Silver Club status for the quality and quantity of its goals. Members gave President Bruce a prolonged standing ovation for his service.

As his last official act, President Bruce swore in President-Elect Kevin Brunson as President for 2017-2018 and passed the presidential pin and gavel to his custody. President Kevin, in turn, thanked now Past President Bruce for his help in preparing him for his new responsibilities and presented him with a plaque, noting that he had been the Club’s 80th president since its founding. He ended the meeting by recognizing all Past Presidents who were in attendance.


The Brunson Presidency Begins

Announcements and Recognitions

Past President John Richmond appealed for a family to agree to host the Club’s GRSP student during the 2018-2019 school year, and Rotarian Zach Taylor asked for volunteers to provide transportation to enable the 2017-2018 student to attend GRSP events and other extra-curricular activities. President Bruce announced that the Family of Rotary social on June 20 went well and was attended by several potential new members. He awarded Blue Badges to Rotarians Tommy Willingham, Laurice Tatum, and Amy Messick. Finally, he asked the Club to recognize the hard work of the Dalton Golf and Country Club staff for preparing and serving lunch at each week’s Dalton Rotary meeting, and the members responded with a standing ovation.


Blue Badge recipients and the DGCC kitchen staff



July 4th & 11th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Parker, Hoyt Jason (JASON) 4-Jul    
Wright, William B. Jr. (WILLIAM) 5-Jul    
Combs, William Dan (DAN) 7-Jul    
Campbell, J Carl (CARL) 8-Jul    
Neal, John P. III (JOHN) 9-Jul    
Pangle, William T (TODD) 10-Jul    
Stewart, Robert T (ROBERT) 13-Jul    
Clark, M Michael (MIKE) 13-Jul    
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) 13-Jul    
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) 14-Jul    
Thomas, Don R. (DON) 14-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Cruse, Amy Cruse, Lesley Dale 11-Jul  
Kinard, Bob Kinard, Dixie 13-Jul  
Townsend, Teresa Townsend, Patrick J. 15-Jul  
Smalley, Rachel Smalley, Robert H. 16-Jul  
Scott, Catherine Scott, William M. 17-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Venable, Margaret H. (MARGARET) 7/7/2015 2  
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) 7/10/2007 10  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Brooker, Robert H. (BOB) Janet 5-Jul 47
Parrott, V DeForrest III(DEFORREST) Eugenia 6-Jul 59
Dent, Gregory J (GREG) Marybeth 7-Jul 1
Combs, William Dan (DAN) Donna 11-Jul 47
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) Carole 15-Jul 22
Neal, John P. III(JOHN) Terri 15-Jul 45
Hutcheson, John A. Jr.(JOHN) Marilyn 15-Jul 50
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) Annelle 17-Jul 17

Image

An Evening Of Fun At The Family Of Rotary Social


Rotarians traded their lunch appointment for a dinner date last Tuesday, meeting after hours for the Family of Rotary Social. 

The event was well attended by Rotarians and their spouses, as well as a number of potential new members who had a chance to learn about our club and our membership in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. President Bruce called the event a success, noting that it was a "a very fun and relaxing evening." In addition to getting a chance to meet some potential new Rotarians, our club members enjoyed sharing a club meeting with members of their family. 

June 27th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Little, William Norris Sr. (NORRIS) 28-Jun    
Chambliss, Darla P (DARLA) 3-Jul    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Maret, Sarah Maret, Charles D. 1-Jul  
Alderman, Alicia Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr. 3-Jul  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) 6/30/2004 13  
Johnson, Larry Alan (LARRY) 7/1/2013 4  
Dent, Gregory J (GREG) 7/1/2014 3  
Weaver, William B (BILL) 7/1/1969 48  
Thomas, Don R. (DON) 7/1/1973 44  
O'Neill, Michael Paul (MIKE) 7/1/2010 7  
Jones, J Sherwood III(SHERWOOD) 7/1/1996 21  
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) 7/1/2013 4  
Gilreath, Judy Ellen (JUDY) 7/1/2013 4  
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr.(MAURICE) 7/1/1980 37  
Payne, Charles F Jr(CHUCK) 7/1/2017 0  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
O'Neill, Michael Paul (MIKE) Lin 30-Jun 33
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) Bill 1-Jul 50
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) Phyllis 1-Jul 50
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) Linda 1-Jul 50
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr.(ROY) Pat 2-Jul 51
Harris, Kevin W (KEVIN) Lezlie 3-Jul 35




Chattanooga Area Food Bank


By John Hutcheson

Past President David Aft introduced Gina Crumbliss, President and CEO of the Chattanooga Area Food Bank, which began working in Dalton during the Great Recession. Gina came to the Food Bank in 2016 after a very successful career in commercial banking, and she is also the Immediate Past President of the Hamilton Place Rotary Club.


Gina Crumbliss

After noting that she knew President-Elect Kevin from her work as a banker, Gina related how the Chattanooga Area Food Bank serves an area covering 7,000 square miles including twenty counties, of which nine are in Georgia. In Dalton alone the Food Bank works with thirty-one different partners, and monies given to the Food Bank from Dalton stay in Dalton. The Chattanooga agency is a member of Feeding America, which enables them to secure large-scale acquisitions of food.

In north Georgia one of every four children and one of every seven adults are food-insecure, and in Whitfield County 8.3% of the general population fall into this condition. Contrary to some assumptions, most of the needy are members of the working poor, with at least one paycheck in the family. Feeding America has chosen the Chattanooga Area Food Bank as one of three pilot groups in the nation for accelerated action, enabling it to double the size of its operation.

Food for distribution comes mainly from retail partners, such as supermarkets, and the Food Bank works with local agencies to assess needs. The Northwest Georgia Food Bank is a branch of Chattanooga’s Food Bank, operating a 10,000 square foot facility and currently in search of a Development Officer to manage it. While some distribution is made directly, most is done through the partner agencies. Funding is dependent on grants, donations, and revenues generated by direct mailing pieces, with 97¢ of every dollar going to the food programs. In Northwest Georgia, food investment alone was $8.5 million in 2016, out of a total agency budget of $36 million.

Announcements

Substituting for President Bruce, who was attending the RI Conference in Atlanta, Past President Jason Parker called on President-Elect Kevin Brunson for a reminder about the Family of Rotary Social Drop-In which will replace next week’s regular Club meeting, and he also recognized Rotarian Doug McClure for his recent promotion to Major in the Salvation Army. Membership Chair Cherri Robertson came forward for the induction of State Senator Chuck Payne as a new member, sponsored by Rotarian Vallarie Pratt.


Chuck Payne



June 20th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) 21-Jun    
Weaver, William B (BILL) 21-Jun    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Combs, Donna Combs, William Dan 24-Jun  
Neal, Terri Neal, John P. III 24-Jun  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) 6/20/2006 11  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) Melissa 21-Jun 14
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) Sally 23-Jun 41
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) Ginny 25-Jun 12
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) Sara 26-Jun 21



Burr Park: So Cool You Have To Wear Shades


By Darla Chambliss

Past President David introduced the presentation, an update on the Burr Performing Arts Park and Showalter Stage in downtown Dalton. The park is a philanthropic gift of the sunglasses-clad Jeanne Burr, made in the form of a $1 million donation to establish it and a permanent endowment to ensure its future.


David Aft

Designed by local architects Lowell and Nathan Kirkman, the park encompasses about 1.4 acres. The design plan includes a change in the topography to include earthen berms; specifically two seating berms and a sound berm. The sound berm will act to “roll” the sound back to the sloped lawn seating area – this should provide for some great performance sound.

The main performance site, The Showalter Stage, will accommodate large dance productions, while the smaller performance areas will enable local musicians and other artists to perform. David addressed the economic driver potential of the venue and noted the park is within walking distance of 25 restaurants and downtown shopping. The Showalter Stage is named in recognition of Anthony Johnson Showalter. Showalter is perhaps best known for writing the music and chorus of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” published in 1887.

JEANNEFEST 2017 was a free concert drawing 600 folks with dogs and children in tow — it forecasts the popularity of the 2018 Summer Concert Series that is planned post construction. The Dalton Downtown Development Association will manage the property and booking. All interested in learning more are encouraged to visit www.communityfoundationnwga.org

President Bruce closed the meeting by thanking Past President David for the excellent program.

Announcements

April Schneller thanked the club on behalf of her daughters (Kelsey and Meghan Schneller) for the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) camp scholarships. Her daughters wished to tell our club, “We had a blast! Thank you!” The Schnellers were RYLA camp scholarship recipients.

A Family of Rotary event will be held at the DGCC on Tuesday, June 20th from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in place of the regular lunchtime meeting. This “drop-in” membership event is the perfect opportunity to bring a friend or colleague that you feel would make an excellent Rotarian. Contact President-elect Kevin Brunson for more information.

Former Georgia Rotary Student Program (GRSP) students Isabel Vinterbladh and Kathrin Hennicke received a warm Dalton homecoming after extremely long flights. Isabel traveled from Sweden and Kathrin from Germany.



June 13th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Sanders, Drayton M II (DRAYTON) 13-Jun    
Bledsoe, Jonathan L. (JONATHAN) 14-Jun    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Little, Billie Little, William Norris Sr. 13-Jun  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
McClure, Douglas E (DOUGLAS) Storm 14-Jun 14
McDonald, David L (DAVID) Frances 15-Jun 48
Scott, William M. (WILL) Catherine 16-Jun 5
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) Donna 16-Jun 44
Didier, John M. (JOHN) Cathy 19-Jun 35



Melissa Cawood: Faith, Perseverance, and Service


By John Hutcheson

Past President Skeeter Pierce introduced Pam Partain, Director of Marketing and Communications at Dalton State College. After citing several recent instances of the College’s growth, Pam emphasized that the best indication of its success is the quality of its alumni. Among these, one of the very best examples is Melissa Cawood, a graduate of the DSC School of Education who is now in her seventh year of teaching and is currently a member of the faculty at City Park Elementary School.


Melissa Cawood

Following Pam’s introduction, Melissa began her remarks by commending the Club for recognizing outstanding fifth grade students and reinforcing the ideal of service which these awards instilled in them. Her own life has been guided by a belief in service, incorporating many of Rotary’s values and using her God-given gifts to make a positive difference in the life of others.

Much of her dedication to service grew out of Melissa’s experiences as a student at Northwest Whitfield High School and at Dalton State, where she received her bachelor’s degree in elementary education in 2010. Having grown up with her mother in a single-parent home, she had to finance her education herself, and for a time she worked a full-time job while also carrying a full academic load. Relief came when the DSC Foundation awarded her two need-based scholarships, one of which was endowed by Rotarians Dixie and Bob Kinard, who have since become her close friends. This assistance enabled her to transition from full-time work off campus to part-time jobs on campus, where she worked in various aspects of Student Affairs and eventually became one of the first five residence life counselors when DSC opened its own housing facilities in the former Wood Valley Apartments. At the same time, she involved herself deeply as a leader in numerous student organizations while also developing her passion for teaching through the training she received in the School of Education.

After graduation, Melissa’s first teaching experience was in Ethiopia, where she taught for three years at the Bingham Academy, an international Christian school in Addis Ababa. As at DSC, she was again obliged to pay her own way, and again she benefitted from the generosity of others who came forward to fulfill a need. After much prayerful consideration, in 2013 she felt called to return to the U.S., and upon coming back to Dalton she was contacted by Principal Rick Little of City Park Elementary School, where she had done her student teaching, about taking a position on his faculty. Now in her fourth year as a fifth-grade teacher, she clearly sees how her career has proceeded as part of God’s will. The Dalton Public Schools system has provided ample opportunity for her professional development, enabling her to go to graduate school and earn her master’s degree in reading instruction from Georgia State University.

Teaching at City Park is hard but rewarding, for its students’ needs are great, which Melissa demonstrated with a range of telling statistics—for example, 81% of City Park students qualify for free lunches, and 21% get English language support. Along with her work there, since 2014 Melissa has also volunteered at City of Refuge, where she is now Director of Educational Volunteers who address the physical and emotional needs of underprivileged students. She has successfully written a grant, and in partnership with the Dalton and Whitfield County school systems she established a summer reading program which served more than sixty students in the summer of 2016 and will expand to include mathematics this coming summer. She is also engaged in developing a survey of after-school needs in both Dalton and Whitfield County.

In closing, Melissa stressed that financial support for need-based scholarship must be seen as a powerful form of social investment, offering her own life experience as an example. Education is the best tool for escaping poverty, and she has dedicated her life to furthering this ideal, grounded by a firm faith in God’s providence and a readiness to assume leadership responsibilities. To illustrate the sort of reward that may result, she described her pride and gratification when one of her City of Refuge students was recognized last week among Rotary’s outstanding students.

Moved and inspired by Melissa’s account, Club members gave her the unusual tribute of a standing ovation.

Announcements

President Bruce thanked Rotarian Jonathan Bledsoe and the other members of the Scholarship Committee for their work in producing last week’s awards program, and he noted that there will be no meeting on May 30 since the Dalton Country Club will be closed. He then called on Rotarian Smitty Barnett, who reminded members about the patriotic program in honor of veterans which will be held at the Courthouse on Memorial Day at 10:00 a.m. President-Elect Kevin Brunson indicated that a few vacancies remain on the Board roster for 2017-2018 and he would welcome volunteers who might be interested in filling them. Past President John Richmond stated that Elsa Halsted of Sweden, one of our club’s former GRSP students, will attend the District 6910 social event to be held in Athens on June 20 in connection with the Atlanta RI Convention. Finally, Rotarian Judy Elliott told about having recently attended a Rotary meeting during a trip to Kaua’i, where she exchanged our club’s banner for one from the Kaua’i Rotary Club.


Banner From Kaua'i



Rotary Scholarship Awards Day


By John Hutcheson

One of the highlights of the Rotary year is the annual Scholarship Awards Day, when students selected by high schools in Dalton and Whitfield County are honored for their exceptional accomplishments in mathematics and the sciences, the humanities, career technology, and service. At this time the Club also recognizes students qualifying for its support to attend the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) camp during the upcoming summer. Finally, a $500 scholarship is awarded to each participating school’s nominee as its outstanding student overall, and one of these is chosen by a committee of Club members to receive an additional $500 for truly superior achievement. The awards for 2017 are especially significant because for the first time the nominees include students from Christian Heritage High School. This year’s scholarship committee consisted of Rotarians Jonathan Bledsoe (Chair), Rob Bradham, John Hutcheson, Douglas McClure, Judson Manley, John Minor, Scott Rhoden, Maurice Sponcler, and Barbara Ward.

Barbara Ward presented this year’s RYLA participants, who include Anna Hodges and Sean Pye from Dalton High School, and Kelsey Schneller and her twin sister, Meghan, from Christian Heritage School.

Jonathan Bledsoe opened the presentation of Outstanding Students by welcoming visiting family members and school personnel who were attending in support of their students, and he called on various committee members to announce the students and their schools.

Rob Bradham presented the Outstanding Math/Science Students:

Christa Sutton - Northwest Whitfield
Tyler Coker - Coahulla Creek
Darryn Pasqua - Christian Heritage
Taylor Kate Boyett - Dalton
Michael Jones - Southeast Whitfield

John Hutcheson presented the Outstanding Humanities Students:

Cassia Mugge - Christian Heritage
Damary Gutierrez-Hernandez - Coahulla Creek
Hannah Barry - Dalton
Dylon Graham - Southeast Whitfield
Thomas McMullen - Northwest Whitfield

Maurice Sponcler presented the Outstanding Career Technology Students:

Kaylub Kuhn - Morris Innovative
Sandra Garcia - Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy
Andrew Johnston - Coahulla Creek
Shane Babb - Southeast Whitfield
Anna Dickie - Northwest Whitfield
Iosep Barcenas - Dalton

Scott Rhoden presented the Outstanding Service Students:

Simon Ngure - Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy
Garbriela Barajas - Coahulla Creek
Megan Baker - Northwest Whitfield
Justin Volzer - Christian Heritage
Kevin Beard - Dalton
Bailey Palmer - Southeast Whitfield

Jonathan returned to announce the nominees for overall Outstanding Area Student:

Raul Garcia - Southeast Whitfield
Jacob Smith - Northwest Whitfield
Heath Hardaway - Christian Heritage
Laura Shaheen - Dalton
Bryce Jones - Coahulla Creek

From this extraordinarily competitive field Laura Shaheen was selected as the Rotary Outstanding Area Student for 2017, and plaques listing her and all the other winners since the program’s beginning in 1989 will be displayed at Dalton High School during the coming year.


Some of our oustanding area students



May 23rd Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) 23-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Bradham, Melissa Bradham, Robert L. 26-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) 5/24/2016 1  
McFarland, Frances M. (BITSY) 5/25/1999 18  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) David 24-May 31
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) Carolyn 24-May 48
Ryman, Milton J. Jr.(MILTON) Mary 28-May 68



7 on 7 Football in Dalton


By John Hutcheson

Rotarian William Bronson presented a program focused on the Southeastern 7 on 7 Football Tournament to be held in Dalton on July 14th and 15th. This will be the sport’s seventh season in Dalton, where it has been sponsored by the Daily Citizen since the beginning. The game originated in Texas to provide an additional form of summer recreation for high school athletes, and it has spread widely, especially in the Southeast. Although it lacks linemen and tackling, with players wearing only helmets but no pads, this form of football provides excellent training for the conventional game and makes similar demands on strategy, ball handling, and other football skills. Teams consist of seven offensive and seven defensive players, and each game is timed at twenty minutes.


William Bronson

All local teams are automatically invited to the championship tournaments held in Dalton, which over the past seven years have attracted more than one hundred additional teams from fourteen states, who have played more than a thousand games. Various local turf fields are used, and the Dalton tournament is unique in that it is the only one which is a community-based event rather than a fund-raising device. It is an important stimulus to the local economy and attracts much support from businesses and merchants. Play is intense, and Dalton’s tournament compares very favorably with the one in Hoover, Alabama, which is considered the premier such competition.

President Bruce closed the meeting by noting that the Rotary booth at the recent Business Expo attracted several persons who may be interested in becoming members of the club.

Announcements and Recognitions

Sergeant-at-Arms Zack Taylor recognized visiting Rotarian Maggie Kruger, who was attending as the guest of Rotarian Amy Luffman and historically was only the third woman to become a Rotarian. President Bruce thanked those who organized and assisted with last week’s Fifth Grader Awards program, especially Amanda Reed, Scott Rhoden, and Paul Alderman, and he reminded members of the high school student awards to be announced next week. Rotarian Greg Dent drew attention to the Bill Gregory Healthcare Classic scheduled for May 13, and Past President David Aft did the same for the dedication of the new Jeanne Burr Park to be held in downtown Dalton later that day. Membership Chair Cherri Robertson inducted Anna Adamson, who was sponsored by Dixie Kinard.


Anna Adamson

Chamber Expo

President Bruce joined President-Elect Kevin Brunson and Jason Parker on May 3rd at the Dalton-Whitfield Chamber of Commerce's Business Expo to promote membership in Rotary. 


Expo Booth

FOUR WAY TEST



May 16th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
McFarland, Frances M. (BITSY) 17-May    
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) 19-May    
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) 21-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Peterefreund, Anna Peterfreund, Allen David 19-May  
Elliott, S. G. Elliott, Judy M. 22-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) 5/19/1998 19  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) Avalee 17-May 3


5th Grade Service Awards


By John Hutcheson

For the seventh year the Club held its annual Charlie Bowen 5th Grade Service Above Self Awards program for students who’ve been outstanding examples of Rotary’s motto during their elementary school years. Perfectly organized by Rotarians Amanda Reed, Paul Alderman, and Scott Rhoden, the event introduced Club members to a group of boys and girls whose accomplishments and commitment to the well-being of others are truly extraordinary for persons so young.

After a welcome from President Bruce, Amanda explained the purpose and criteria for the awards and recounted her exposure to the ideals of Rotary from the time she began her first job, at age 16, in the office of then-District Attorney Jack Partain, a process which continued as she was introduced to Superior Court Judge Coy Temples and still later worked with former Dalton Mayor David Pennington. These and other Rotarians taught her the importance of always doing the right thing—the core of Rotary, which has shaped her life. Since becoming chair of the Fifth Grade Service Above Self Awards Committee in 2011, she has been delighted to put Rotary’s values before today’s fifth graders and to make them feel special for upholding them.

Amanda then introduced Dr. Judy Gilreath, Whitfield County Schools Superintendent, who congratulated and presented the following students from her system:

Hannah Lloyd, age 11, from Antioch Elementary; Jersey Poe, age 11, from Beaverdale Elementary; Tina Quintanilla, age 11, from Cedar Ridge Elementary; Camryn Parker, age 11, from Cohutta Elementary; Litzy Reyes, age 11, from Dawnville Elementary; Karen Garcia, age 11, from Dug Gap Elementary; Maria Agustina Maldanado Rodela, age 11, from Eastside Elementary; Leanne Climer, age 11, from New Hope Elementary; Jared Farias, age 10, from Pleasant Grove Elementary; Courtney Robbins, age 11, from Tunnel Hill Elementary; Alex Roberts, age 11, from Valley Point Elementary; Isaac Mantooth, age 11, from Varnell Elementary; and Taylor Wimpey, age 10, from Westside Elementary.

Dr. Jim Hawkins, Superintendent of Dalton Public Schools, recognized the following students from that system:

Jaiyin Ochoa, age 11, from Blue Ridge Elementary; Thomas Morris, age 11, from Brookwood Elementary; Soe Ramirez, age 12, from City Park Elementary; David Rivas, age 10, from Park Creek Elementary; Equinardo Gael Fraire, age 11, from Roan Elementary; and Autumn Johnson, age 11, from Westwood Elementary. 


Award winners

Each of the winning students received a copy of Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul by Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen, a framed certificate, and a bag of give-aways appropriate for fifth-graders from local merchants and businesses. 

Amanda read brief passages from each of the entries in the Laws of Life essay competition, which included submissions from Thomas Morris of Brookwood, David Rivas of Park Creek, Gael Fraire of Roan, Autumn Johnson of Westwood, Camryn Parker of Cohutta, Karen Garcia of Dug Gap, Maria Rodela of Eastside, Jared Farias of Pleasant Grove, Alex Roberts of Valley Point, and Taylor Wimpey of Westside, along with Litzy Reyes of Dawnville and Courtney Robbins of Tunnel Hill who were co-runners-up in the competition. The program closed with Amanda’s reading of the winning essay, written by Hannah Lloyd of Antioch Elementary, in its entirety.



May 9th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) 9-May    
Scott, Trammell (TRAMMELL) 12-May    
Mixer, Mark S (MARK) 13-May    
Creswell, Catrina Celeste (CELESTE) 15-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sherwood, Jean Jones, J. Sherwood Jr. 9-May  
Blevins, David Blevins, Sheri H. 15-May  
Broadrick, Mary Ann Broadrick, Bruce L. 15-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Anderson, Michael S (MICHAEL) Adina 14-May 12


Providence Ministries Recovery Program


By John Hutcheson

Rotarian Judy Elliot began the program by recalling that she had recently served as emcee at a fashion show for women recovering from drug and alcohol addictions through Providence Ministries, and she introduced Rotarian Roy Johnson, Providence’s Founder and President. Roy noted that drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death in the U. S. He then introduced Kristina Cole, Director of Women’s Programs at Providence. Kristina told of having struggled for seventeen years with various addictions—eating, alcohol, and drugs—and by age twenty-seven she had passed through more than a dozen short-term recovery programs, never with more than temporary success. Although she had come from a prosperous home, she always felt herself to be an outsider. Finally giving her an ultimatum, her family sent her to Providence and she consented to go, even though she considered herself to be an atheist. At Providence, though, she became a Christian, and through its uniquely affordable long-term program she successfully changed her behavior. Based on faith with Christ at the forefront, Providence’s women’s program operates four houses accommodating up to thirty female clients, along with a transition house to facilitate their passage to independent living.


Roy Johnson, Kristina Cole, Brandon Townsend

Following Kristina, Brandon Townsend, Director of Men’s Programs at Providence, told his personal story of how God changed his life twice through Providence. The son of a social worker in the Calhoun schools, as a teenager he was active in movements against the use of drugs and alcohol. Following high school, he joined the Navy and was eventually sent to the officer training program at Auburn University. However, after breaking up with a girlfriend he began drinking and was eventually discharged from the Navy. He returned to Calhoun, where he got into drugs and began a downward spiral that led to legal troubles. He was sent to the Damascus Road Recovery Program in Covington, Georgia, but after completing it he was left homeless in Atlanta. Out of desperation he turned to God and found his way to Providence. He managed to get a good job and seemed on a stable path, but another breakup pushed him back toward addiction. Returning to Providence, he resolved to stay longer than previously, and he remains there today.

Roy closed the program by recognizing Providence’s Chief Operating Officer and Chaplain, Wesley Noland, and Kevin Harris, one of its board members.

Announcements and Recognitions

President Bruce announced that the Club has bought a Shelter Box, and he relayed thanks from Sarah Robinson of the Shelter Box organization. In her note, Ms. Robinson related that a Shelter Box team in Swaziland saw a Shelter Box tent being used as a café, along with blankets and other items having Rotary origins, and she hoped that the Shelter Box/Rotary partnership will continue indefinitely. President Bruce also reminded members of next week’s Fifth Grade Awards program and asked for volunteers to assist the many guests expected to attend.

Dr. Onsy Bestawros was recognized by President Bruce for having earned his blue badge, and President-Elect Kevin Brunson presented a District 6910 Sustaining Club banner for the 2015-2016 year to Past President Jason Parker in honor of his service during that year. President Bruce then recognized Rotarian Roger Williams for having earned his Paul Harris Plus One award.


Dr. Onsy Bestawros, Jason Parker, and Roger Williams



May 2nd Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) 3-May    
Manly, William Judson Jr. (JUDSON) 8-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Jones, Patrick Jones, Kelly McDonald 3-May  
Winter, Connie Winter, Larry E. 4-May  
Bronson, Erica Bronson, William III 4-May  
Bailey, Dell Bailey, Philip Bates 4-May  
 
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Parker, Hoyt Jason (JASON) April 2-May 25
Williams, Roger (ROGER) Joann 5-May 61
Pangle, William T (TODD) Belinda 6-May 22
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) Laura 7-May 23


Thoughts On Achieving Greatness


By John Hutcheson

Dalton Rotarians joined members of the Hamilton Business Alliance in a Forum held at the Hamilton Medical Center for a presentation entitled “How to Achieve Greatness at Work and in Life” by Dr. Kevin Elko. Dr. Elko holds a bachelor’s degree in Biology, Education, and Coaching from California University of Pennsylvania and two master’s degrees and the doctorate from West Virginia University. His work focuses on helping organizations improve in leadership, goal setting, vision creation, and many other motivational areas, and he has served as a consultant for a large number of prestigious corporations and collegiate and professional sports organizations. He is the author of five books, of which the most recent is The Sender, based on his involvement with Indianapolis Colts Head Coach Chuck Pagano’s battle with cancer.

Dr. Elko is an extraordinarily dynamic and compelling speaker, and his remarks overflowed with amusing and catchy but deeply wise one-liners. He stressed the need for his audience to rid their minds of “mental clutter” which impedes living their most effective lives, and he pointed out that each person lives either in circumstance or in vision. It is crucially important to claim one’s own vision by developing a personal “script” to be used in the course of each day, always bearing in mind the formula of E + R = O—Event plus Response equals Outcome. Every task or obligation should be regarded from the standpoint of “I get to” rather than “I have to.” More than anything else, success is the result of “grit,” which is simply perseverance and follow-through. Success and adversity alike must be met with the forward-looking perspective of “so what, now what?” In relating to others, individuals should stop being interesting and instead be interested, just as they should stop looking for blessings in their lives in favor of being a blessing in someone else’s life.

April 25th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Dent, Gregory J (GREG) 27-Apr    
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) 27-Apr    
Bowen, William C. III (BILL) 29-Apr    
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) 29-Apr    
Patterson, Frank W Jr. (FRANK) 29-Apr    
Scott, William M. (WILL) 30-Apr    
Smith, Clark C. (CLARK) 30-Apr    
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) 1-May    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Holmes, Cathy Didier, John M. 1-May  
Kinard, Dixie Kinard, Robert W 1-May  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) 5/1/1983 34  
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) 5/1/1980 37  
Ryman, Milton J. Jr.(MILTON) 5/1/1989 28  
Williams, Roger (ROGER) 5/1/1978 39  
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) 5/1/1984 33  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Kelehear, Leon S. (SPARKY) Pat 25-Apr 31
Luffman, Amy R (AMY) Timothy 25-Apr 2
Cooke, Christopher M (CHRIS) Cathy 27-Apr 26
Adcock, Don W. (DON) Diane 28-Apr 48
Tatum, Laurice A. (LAURICE) Sharon 29-Apr 45


Earl Lusk Memorial Golf Tournament 2016


We had another successful golf tournament on April 11th! Thank you to everyone who came out to work or play in support of the annual Earl Lusk Memorial Golf Tournament! 



April 18th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Partain, Jack (JACK) 18-Apr    
Luffman, Amy R (AMY) 21-Apr    
Goodroe, Robert S. (ROBERT) 23-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Bledsoe, Ginny Bledsoe, Jonathan L. 21-Apr  
Brantley, Tray Brantley, Valerie K 22-Apr  
Hoskins, Carole Hoskins, Douglas H. 23-Apr  
Bestawros, Hilda Bestawros, Onsy A 23-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Myers, Jeffrey Donald (JEFFREY) 4/19/2005 12  
Wright, William B. Jr.(WILLIAM) 4/24/2012 5  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) Bob 19-Apr 48
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) Dixie 19-Apr 48


April 11th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Poehlman, John H. (JOHN) 11-Apr    
McClurg, Charles R. (RONNIE) 11-Apr    
Sellers, Kathryn Oehler (KATHRYN) 11-Apr    
Harris, Kevin W (KEVIN) 16-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Abernathy, Virginia Abernathy, Sid G. 13-Apr  
Dent, Marybeth Dent, Gregory J 16-Apr  
Srivastava, Vinai Srivastava, Archana 16-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Stewart, Robert T (ROBERT) Celeste 15-Apr 29


GRSP Student Update


By Ty Ross

The Club's current Georgia Rotary Student Program (GRSP) student, Fredrik Mazur, could not say enough about the hospitality he experienced during his GRSP year with host Rotarian Larry Winter and his wife Connie. Together with the support of Rotarian John Richmond and his wife Agnes, the Club's GRSP program can boast another successful year.


Fredrik Mazur

First a bit about Fredrik. Fredrik is from Stockholm, Sweden and began his GRSP year in August when he enrolled at Dalton State College as a foreign exchange student. While at Dalton State, Fredrik particularly enjoyed his classes in American Government as well as the History of American Sports. What Fredrik enjoyed most about Dalton State and the Dalton/Whitfield Community in general was the strong sense of community and importance of relationships which were quite profound to him.

Reflecting on his year, Fredrik felt fortunate while studying American sports to experience many American sports in person. For example, he was able to attend an NCAA football game, an NFL game, an MLB game, as well as multiple NBA games. He found football to be the most exciting and found baseball to be a bit "slow" in his estimation.

Fredrik's GRSP experience also gave him ample opportunity to travel throughout Georgia and the USA. In Georgia he visited Savannah (twice), Atlanta, August and Valdosta. Farther out were visits to Washington D.C. and Philadelphia. What Fredrik enjoyed most about his travels, besides visiting historic sites and museums, was the opportunity to spend quality time with other GRSP students which were usually just a Facebook message away.

A major highlight of his year was being able to link up with his family, who came from Sweden to visit him. In Florida the Mazur family was able to catch a Miami Heat game together and while in Georgia they toured the Coke Museum, which Fredrik's father, a professional marketer, took a very keen interest in.

Fredrik said that top of mind for him will always be the holidays and weekends he was able to spend at the Winter household. He will never forget the feast shared at Thanksgiving and the shared American ritual of falling asleep watching football after Thanksgiving dinner.

After Fredrik wraps up his classes at Dalton State he will return to Sweden where he plans to attend University and study mechanical engineering.

Safe Travels, Fredrik. The Rotary Club of Dalton wishes nothing but the best for you and yours.

Last but not least, the Club extends its heartfelt appreciation to the Winter family for serving as Fredrik's host family as well as all the Club members who support this program.

Thanks to you all, especially Larry and Connie!



February 28th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Chute, Patricia M (PAT) 28-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Johnson, Pat Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr. 1-Mar  
Wright, Joanne Wright, Thomas L 3-Mar  
Bowen, Ann Bowen, William C. III 5-Mar  
Pierce, Lamar Pierce, Sara C. 5-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Griffin, Ronald L (RON) 3/1/1988 29  
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) 3/1/1976 41  
Bowen, William C. III(BILL) 3/1/1975 42  
Manly, William Judson Jr.(JUDSON) 3/1/1964 53  
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) 3/1/1975 42  
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) 3/1/1994 23  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


Dalton Utilities: An Overview From The CEO


President Bruce introduced Rotarian Tom Bundros, Chief Executive Officer of Dalton Utilities. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration and finance, Tom worked as a financial analyst and was employed by the Southern Company for eighteen years before coming to Dalton Utilities in 1997 as Chief Financial Officer. In 2009 he joined Colonial Pipeline, but in 2012 he returned to his former position at Dalton Utilities and became CEO in 2016.


Tom Bundros

Tom began his presentation by thanking the residential, corporate, and industrial customers of Dalton Utilities since they are the basis for the company’s success. Operating in the areas of electricity, water, wastewater, natural gas, and broadband access, Dalton Utilities is greatly advantaged by its vertical integration, extending from original production to final distribution within a territory assigned under the Georgia General Assembly’s Territorial Electric Service Act of 1973. For example, in electricity, Dalton Utilities is a part owner of Plant Vogtle and holds interests in three other nuclear power plants as well. In natural gas it owns 261 miles of underground distribution across more than five counties. Its water treatment facilities process about 65 million gallons per day and it has a drought contingency storage capacity of 2.69 billion gallons in four reservoirs—enough to supply Dalton’s needs for 2.5 months. There are five wastewater treatment plants and a 9,800+ acre forested land application site which is the largest in the state and one of the largest in the nation. In information technology, Dalton Utilities owns the only 100% fiber optic system in Georgia, with over 400 miles of fiber network.

A SWOT analysis in 2016 led to formulation of a new strategic plan which includes a $35 million upgrade in infrastructure reliability, improved customer service (including remote meter reading), and a new emphasis on communication through social media. Within Dalton a conversion to LED lighting has begun, and a new reservoir management plan is being developed for Haig Mill Reservoir.

Since 2006 Dalton Utilities’ operating revenues have exceeded its expenditures without including subsidies from the investment portfolio. Total assets are now near $1 billion, and while the investment portfolio’s value has declined as income is used mainly for nuclear decommissioning, the company’s debt capitalization has fallen from $200 million in 1999 to zero today—an accomplishment unique among comparable utilities in Georgia—leaving a positive value of more than $800 million. Capital expenditures since 1997 total $900 million, and during that period the amount of $150 million was transferred to the City of Dalton at an average rate of $8 million per year. The balance of deferred capital expenditures is $174 million, some of which may be used in the future for debt financing.

Among the challenges facing Dalton Utilities are the need for a new water treatment facility at a cost of $85 million to replace one dating from the 1950’s, conformity with increasing regulatory requirements which consume more and more manpower, and the necessity for additional personnel (ideally drawn from a younger employee base to encourage continuity) and facilities to keep up with the area’s growing population. Opportunities include excess capacity which can attract new businesses, the community’s location in a headwaters area rather than one with potential downstream depletion concerns, a low rate structure that is highly competitive, and the capability to provide one-stop shopping for all utilities, from electricity and water to broadband.

Announcements

Rotarian Ricky Robertson reminded the Club about the track meet on March 11 as did Rotarian Chris Cooke regarding the golf tournament on April 11; both asked for additional assistance from members. President Bruce again emphasized the importance of recruiting new members to the Club. While the current roster lists six more than it did on July 1, 2016, we have not yet reached our goal of ten new members for the current year, and we’re especially eager to add more young persons and women.



February 21st Birthdays and Annversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
No birthdays this period.  
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Kiker, John Kiker, Janice F. 24-Feb  
Jolly, Becky Jolly, Hilliard R. 25-Feb  
Brooker, Janet Brooker, Robert H. 27-Feb  
Jones, Danielle Jones, J Sherwood III 27-Feb  
Ward, Allen Ward, Barbara K. 27-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) 2/23/2016 1  
Ross, James Tyson (TY) 2/23/2010 7  
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) 2/23/2010 7  
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) 2/23/2010 7  
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) 2/23/2016 1  
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) 2/24/1998 19  
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) 2/24/1998 19  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) Susan 23-Feb 43
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) Bobby 27-Feb 18


SPLOST Funds At Work: Updates From Local Firefighters


by John Hutcheson

Chief Bruce Satterfield of the Dalton Fire Department and Chief Ed O’Brien of the Whitfield County Fire Department presented an update on how funds received from the Special Local Option Sales Tax of 2015 have been used to enhance their departments’ firefighting effectiveness.

Now on the threshold of a much-deserved retirement, Chief Satterfield joined the Dalton department in 1980 and rose through the ranks to become chief in 2009. Chief O’Brien came to Whitfield County in 2014 after 28 years with the Dekalb County Fire Department and an impressive array of service with statewide firefighting and EMT agencies.


Chiefs Ed O'Brien and Bruce Satterfield

Chief Satterfield related that the Dalton Fire Department received $1.6 million from the SPLOST which was used to purchase three new units. Two of these were Class A pumpers, capable of pumping 2,000 gallons per minute, which replaced 1993 and 1997 models. With support equipment costing $123,000 for each of these vehicles, the total pumper contract came to $1,254,421. The trucks were delivered in October, 2016, and by using a long-time vendor the department got a discount which saved the City $29,000. In addition, the department purchased a mobile air and light truck for $338,900; its delivery in November, 2016 replaces a broken compressor with a much more effective unit and provides high-intensity lighting that can be used by police and other municipal agencies. After completion of these acquisitions an amount of $6,600 remains in the department’s SPLOST account.

Chief O’Brien pointed out that SPLOST funds enabled the Whitfield County Fire Department to play catch-up necessary for meeting urgent short-term needs. With $5.2 million available, it was able to buy four pumpers and two ladder trucks, replacing units having an average age of 28 years. It was also able to procure much protective equipment for its personnel—individual outfits cost $2,400 apiece and airpack/masks each cost $5,000. Chief among long-term needs is a new Cohutta station, a two-bay structure which will be designed by local architects and should be completed by the spring of 2018.

Future needs for the County department include more equipment replacement, additional staff, upgrades for existing stations, and a new station in the South Riverbend area. The overall goal is to secure lower ISO ratings which will justify lower insurance rates for County residents. Currently most of the County is ISO 5, but some areas, such as South Riverbend, are as high as ISO 10 because they lie five miles or more from a fire station.

A Rotary Minute with Steve Farrow

Rotarian Steve Farrow arrived in Dalton around 1960 when his father came to practice pediatrics with Dr. John Looper. After graduating from Dalton High School, the University of Tennessee, and the University of Georgia School of Law, he settled back in Dalton in 1982 and worked in the firm of Minor, Bell, and Neal for almost 25 years, mainly providing defensive representation for institutional clients. After serving two terms in the Georgia State Senate he was appointed by Governor Perdue to the State Ethics Commission, where he served for four years. In addition, he served on the Department of Transportation Board and for five years as a Workers Compensation Judge. His first exposure to Rotary was through his grandfather, and he competed in the first two track meets sponsored by the Dalton Club, of which he was later a member for 22 years, having joined on the day of the Club’s 50th anniversary. He resigned when his Workers Compensation duties obligated him to prolonged stays in Atlanta, but upon resuming his legal career in Dalton he hastened to rejoin.


Steve Farrow



February 14th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) 14-Feb    
Caperton, Robert William Jr. (ROBERT) 15-Feb    
Johnson, Larry Alan (LARRY) 18-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Henson, Jean Henson, Paul E. Jr. 14-Feb  
Chambliss, Alex Chambliss, Darla P 18-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) 2/15/2000 17  
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) 2/20/2007 10  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


Dalton Municipal Airport


by Kathryn Sellers

A program about the Dalton Municipal Airport was presented by Manager Justin Morrow who obtained his pilot’s license at age 17.

The Dalton Airport is one of 19 Instrument Landing System airports in the state of Georgia with a 5,500’ runway that is 100’ wide. It takes 1,000 – 1,500 feet for a single engine airplane to land, 2,000+ for twin engine and 4,000+ plus for a King Air or jet.

Dalton handles jets and planes as large as a Gulfstream G6.

Forty two aircraft are based in Dalton. This airport is one of only a few that makes money with an income stream from hangar rental, land leases and fuel sales. Cargo operations also add to income. Funding is 90% federal, 5 % state and 5% from the City of Dalton.


Justin Morrow

The airport produces a substantial economic impact in Dalton with pilots and customers using local restaurants, hotels and shopping.

The airport staff of five makes up the smallest department in the City. Three of these previously served in the military. Two are college students, one is a school principal and one is a retired carpet salesman. This staff is often the first face of Dalton that visitors see. They are ambassadors to the Carpet Capital greeting groups as diverse as salesmen, investors, travelers, softball teams, and business men. Their reputation for service to customers is appreciated and reaps repeat business.

Multiple tasks they facilitate:

  • Southeast staging point for the Met Life Blimp
  • Defense operation against rabies – 5 King Airs spread vaccine for the USDA hoping to eradicate rabies in the region
  • Home base for the US Forestry Service, especially during fires like we experienced recently, housing six helicopters and many crews
  • Home base for the Governor’s drug task force, housing military and state helicopters
  • Training assistance for fire, police and EMT for air accidents
  • Host Civil Air Patrol
  • Host events for various groups: Boy Scouts camp on the property and learn about flying; Pre-school tours
  • Host large events: Fly-ins, this year open to the public and Safety seminars

Soon they will be providing flight training and will have a ground school.

Upgrades in the next few years will include crack sealing and repainting the runways. They hope to open up land for more parking and to alleviate their critical need for more hangars, especially those large enough for larger aircraft. Morrow stated that they are losing business to Chattanooga for these larger aircraft. They have the land but just need the money to grow.

Announcements:

Greg Dent was voted unanimously for the position of President Nominee He will serve in 2018-19.

Polio Update:

President Bruce reported that a group from Georgia and Florida is going to India to help with vaccine distribution in the continued task of eliminating polio worldwide. He provided some interesting facts: 172 million children have been immunized by 2 ½ million vaccinators using all types of transportation from cars, trucks and buses to camels and elephants. 

The large Civic Club signs at entrances to Dalton are going back up with the Rotary logo included. 

Important Rotary events need your volunteer help:

Ronnie McClurg Invitational Track meet -- March 11

Earl Lusk Golf Tournament – April 11



February 7th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday      
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) 12-Feb      
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday    
Adcock, Diane Adcock, Don W. 7-Feb    
Brunson, Cindy Brunson, Kevin M 8-Feb    
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years    
Bronson, William III(WILLIAM) 2/13/2007 10    
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years  
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) Amy 12-Feb 35  


Creative Arts Guild


By John Hutcheson

Rotarian Will Scott introduced Amanda Michaels Brown, Director of the Creative Arts Guild. A native of Dalton and graduate of Dalton High School, Amanda first fell in love with the arts at the Guild and went on to major in theater at the University of the South. After working in Western states and earning a graduate degree, she returned to Dalton and became CAG Director in 2014.


Amanda Michaels Brown

Using a slide presentation, Amanda gave a brief survey of the Creative Arts Guild’s history and current work. With its mission “to cultivate and sustain the arts in Dalton and its surrounding counties,” the Guild seeks through all its endeavors “to make the creative arts relevant, accessible, and enjoyable.” It was founded in 1963 by a group of artistically aware civic leaders and is now the oldest multi-disciplinary community arts center in the state. At the outset the founders adopted the Guild’s distinctive logo, which first appeared around 1150 AD as a symbol for the Buonarotti family of Florence, Italy, and was used extensively by the family’s most distinguished member, Michelangelo, to represent family, home, security, honor, and wealth.

Today the CAG has a staff of eleven full- or part-time employees and contracts with 44 instructors in the performing and visual arts. As a non-profit 501c3 organization it is supported by instructional fees, commission sales, rental fees, and donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations, many stemming from long-standing relationships. A particularly special group is the Golden Givers, composed of 35 donors who have pledged an annual total of $62,000. The Guild also receives funds from the General Assembly of Georgia, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Georgia Council for the Arts, and the Georgia Council for the Humanities, as well as in-kind services from the City of Dalton in return for supporting the City’s vision of progress and growth. It operates two facilities, a 10,000 sq. ft. building on West Waugh Street which holds its offices, galleries, and practice and performing spaces for the music program, and a 24,000 sq. ft. building on the Cleveland Highway which houses programs in dance, gymnastics, and the visual arts.

In 2014 the CAG formulated a new strategic plan that included updated branding, a new cloud-based system for managing information, ticketing, donations, and membership, and a redesigned website. Its four instructional departments in dance, gymnastics, music, and the visual arts all have teachers who hold professional qualifications, and in many instances, relevant advanced degrees. Many scholarships are available, among which the most notable are the Rebecca Fleischer Scholarship in Dance, the Morris Fleischer Scholarship in the Visual Arts, and the Samantha Spiegel Memorial Scholarship, named after the daughter of Bernice Spiegel, the Guild’s founding Director.

One of the CAG’s core purposes is realized through its Arts in Education program, operated in cooperation with local schools and embracing student art exhibitions, field trips, and the Artist in Residency program of the Oscar N. Jonas Memorial Foundation. At its Waugh Street location the Guild maintains the Robert T. Webb Sculpture Garden, three gallery spaces, and the Jonas Performance Hall. Important annual events include Spring for the Arts, held in March; the Low Country Boil in June; the three-day Festival on the third weekend in September, which will reach its 54th anniversary in 2017; and the holiday Festival of Trees, held in partnership with Friendship House. Especially noteworthy is the annual December production of The Snow Queen, a full-length ballet which celebrated its tenth year in 2016 by incorporating music from a 27-piece live orchestra.

On the horizon are the formation of an Artists Council to encourage and support new works by emerging artists, annual conferences for arts educators, new partnerships with suitable entities, and exploring how opportunities may arise from the growing body of scientific work demonstrating the importance of art in maintaining health and wellbeing. Amanda concluded by encouraging Rotarians to suggest new programs and events for the Guild to consider.

Announcements and Recognitions

Rotarian David Aft introduced Tom Brown, Director of DEO, a free medical clinic for low-income and uninsured patients in Whitfield and Murray Counties. President Bruce reminded the Club about the need to recruit new members, and Past President Jason Parker appealed for volunteers to assist at the Ronnie McClurg Track Meet on March 11. Past Presidents John Richmond and Bill Bowen presented a Will Watt Fellowship to Rotarian Kevin Harris, and President Bruce, acting in his capacity as Chief of the Dalton Fire Department, recognized Firefighter Bobby Blackwell as winner of the Department’s Vocational Service Award for 2016-2017—this presentation was delayed because Firefighter Blackwell was on his honeymoon when the other Vocational Service Awards were announced on January 10.



January 31st Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
McKenzie, Sandra D (SANDY) 1-Feb    
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) 1-Feb    
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) 3-Feb    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Weaver, Virginia Weaver, William B 1-Feb  
Barnwell, Delle Barnwell, William L 2-Feb  
Minor, Laura Minor, John Thomas V 3-Feb  
McKenzie, Jimmy McKenzie, Sandra D 6-Feb  
DeLay, Avalee DeLay, Scott G 6-Feb  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
McClurg, Charles R. (RONNIE) 2/1/1989 28  
Kinard, Dixie (DIXIE) 2/1/1996 21  
Kinard, Robert W (ROBERT) 2/1/1981 36  
Adcock, Don W. (DON) 2/1/1979 38  
Cope, Don (DON) 2/1/1996 21  
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) 2/1/1972 45  
Bestawros, Onsy A (ONSY) 2/3/2015 2  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this week.  


Philanthropy and the Community Foundation


By John Hutcheson

Rotarian Miller Jones introduced Club Past President David Aft, who has been President of the Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia since 2004. Prior to assuming his current position, David earned a Master’s in Social Work from Florida State University and moved to Dalton in 1996 to work with the United Way.


David Aft

David began his presentation with brief tributes to Rotarian Gordon Morehouse as the founder of the Community Foundation and to Rotarian John Neal who handled its legal work for many years. He also congratulated Rotarian Steve Farrow, whose son Hardy has been recognized by Forbes Magazine as one of the nation’s “30 Under 30” leading change makers for his work in Memphis to transform impoverished youths into effective entrepreneurs.

Turning to his subject, David noted that charitable giving reflects who we are and what we value. Second only to taxation in providing for needed social services in the United States, in 2015 it generated $37.5 billion, of which the largest share came from individuals and the smallest—about 5%--came from corporations. With the largest part of the total amount going to religious organizations, highly religious areas generated disproportionate amounts; in 2014 Utah, with its large and devout Mormon population, led the states in charitable giving. Georgia ranked fifth, and most of the others in the top ten were in the so-called “Bible Belt.”

Locally, the Community Foundation was established in 1998 as a 501c3 entity. Rather than holding a single large amount of money, its financial framework is built around managing a wide variety of specific funding projects—currently 187—as a regional enterprise across thirteen Northwest Georgia counties. At the end of 2016 its total assets were $41.5 million, and since 1998 it has given away $45.5 million. In 2016 it received more than $8 million and made 689 grants totaling $6.4 million. Its emphasis has been local, with funds directed toward Dalton/Whitfield representing 75% of its total assets, and Whitfield County has an unrestricted endowment of $2.1 million. The Foundation’s overall endowment currently generates $880,460 per year.

For major projects in outlying areas the Foundation has created affiliate funds in Cartersville-Bartow and Calhoun-Gordon. Most of its day-to-day activity is invisible to the public, consisting of fund-raising, organizing, etc., but in all its work the Foundation is guided by three core strategies: (1) to build long-term financial resources for Northwest Georgia charities, (2) to provide tools for philanthropists to help them become even more charitable, and (3) to help strengthen nonprofit organizations by working directly with Northwest Georgia families. The Foundation is presently managing over 44 nonprofit endowments totaling more than $11 million, and a recent addition to these is the newly established Rotary Club of Dalton Charities.

Looking ahead, David said that while “predictions are for sages and the insane,” he would nevertheless venture to make three. First, the landscape of charity will continue to shift drastically, with corporations becoming the biggest single charities; presently the largest in the U.S. is Fidelity Investments. Second, comprehensive tax reform appears inevitable, and as estate taxes disappear, so too will a powerful incentive for charitable giving. This will present special challenges, as will reductions in advised funds and deductibility. Finally, entitlements and healthcare reform may change radically, with results as yet unforeseeable.

Announcements and Recognitions

Beginning a series of announcements, President Bruce pointed out the Club’s need to renew its emphasis on securing new members; after a time of growth we have lost several members through deaths, moves from the area, or increased professional obligations. He also reminded the Club that housing accommodations are still needed for the Golden Gate performers who will be in Dalton in nine days and are scheduled to provide our program on January 31. He noted that the Golf Tournament Committee will meet today and that those interested in helping should see Past President Jason Parker.

Membership Chair Tray Brantley inducted Kristie Gazaway as a new member of the Club, and Pat Townsend was awarded his Blue Badge. Finally, President Bruce recognized Visiting Rotarian Bill Harmon, a member of the Rotary Club of Saginaw, Michigan, who presented a banner from his club. Bill is in Dalton to help restore the Crescent City railroad car located outside the Old Freight Depot in downtown Dalton, and he expressed hopes that the car would be ready to host an open house sometime in February. 


Kristie Gazaway and Bill Harmon



January 24th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday      
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) 24-Jan      
Griffin, Ronald L (RON) 27-Jan      
Carter, Teresa (TERESA) 28-Jan      
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday    
Chappell, Bennieta Chappell, William J. 29-Jan    
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years    
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) 1/27/2009 8    
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years  
No anniversaries this period.    


Vocational Awards 2017


By John Hutcheson

Scott Minter, Vocational Service Chair, announced the 2016-2017 First Responder Awards, recognizing those who have gone above and beyond regular duty and are exemplary members of their professions. Award recipients and their presenters are as follows:

From the Whitfield County Fire Department, Battalion Chief Terry Warnix presented Engineer Chandler Rickett

From the Dalton Fire Department, Chief Bruce Satterfield presented Firefighter Bobby Blackwell

From the Whitfield County Sheriff’s Department, Sheriff Scott Chitwood presented Deputy Charles Meadors

From the Dalton Police Department, Chief Jason Parker presented Detective Brian Shirley

From Hamilton EMS, Director Scott Raedeker presented Paramedic Alan Painter


Vocational Service Honorees

Announcements

Rotarian Dr. Zachary Taylor notified members that Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Public Health, will visit the Whitfield County Health Department on January 30 for a breakfast meeting at which she will speak on early childhood development. President Bruce reminded members to vote in today’s Georgia Senate election. He pointed out that hosts are still needed for the Golden Gates, a performing group of young Russians whose appearance in several area schools between January 26 and February 3 is being sponsored by both the Dalton and the Carpet City Rotary Clubs; the ensemble will present the program for the January 31 meeting of our Club. Finally, he recognized Past President Jason Parker, who will be Assistant Governor for District 6910 during the 2017-2018 year.


Jason Parker

Following the scheduled program, Past Presidents Bill Bowen and John Richmond joined President Bruce in welcoming Lynn Laughter, Judy Elliott, and Kevin Harris (who was unable to attend) as Will Watt Fellows for having contributed $1,000 or more the Georgia Rotary Student Program.


Honoring Lynn Laughter, Judy Elliot, and Kevin Harris

 



January 17 Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Winter, Larry E. (LARRY) 17-Jan    
Bronson, William III (WILLIAM) 19-Jan    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Smith, Rebecca Smith, Clark C. 18-Jan  
Tatum, Sharon Tatum, Laurice A 20-Jan  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Parker, Hoyt Jason (JASON) 1/18/2011 6  
Hoskins, Douglas H. (DOUG) 1/19/2010 7  
Reed, Amanda (AMANDA) 1/19/2010 7  
Brantley, Traylor M (TRAY) 1/20/2015 2  
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) 1/20/2015 2  
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) 1/20/2015 2  
Bowling, John (JOHN) 1/23/2001 16  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Mixer, Mark S (MARK) Kimberly 19-Jan 4
Maret, Charles D. (CHARLES) Sarah 20-Jan 49


Haig Mill Lake Project Updae


By John Hutcheson

President Bruce introduced Steve Card and Steve Robertson of the Dalton Parks and Recreation Department. As the Director of DPRD, Steve Card led a presentation on the progress of the plan to develop a recreational area around the Lower Haig Mill Lake, noting that a public meeting on the subject is scheduled for January 5 at City Hall. The Haig Mill Lake project will be funded by $7.7 million to be generated by the SPLOST approved by voters in 2015, with $5.5 million allocated to the project itself and $2.2 million designated for connectivity with an improved Lakeshore Park. Both components are parts of a larger vision that proposes a chain of recreational green spaces running from downtown Dalton to Heritage Point on the North Bypass. After eight months of permit acquisition, bids for work on the first phase should go out in the next week or two.


Steve Card

Lower Haig Mill Lake is a 125-acre reservoir, built and stocked in 1989, surrounded by 120 to 125 acres of developable land. DPRD is working in partnership with Dalton Utilities, the lake’s owner, to create what could be a “crown jewel” recreational opportunity in North Georgia, with the general feel of a state park. Safety and maintenance of water quality will be the highest priorities, and the finished project will be fenced, open only when staff are present. Swimming will not be allowed, and a 3.5 mile walking trail around the lake will always remain at least 150 feet from the waterline. Engined vessels of any kind will be prohibited, but fishing will be allowed from four fishing piers and from rented non-motorized craft such as canoes, kayaks, and paddle boats.

Near the south end of the lake an Activity Area of 15 acres will have two pavilions, a themed playground, and an outdoor classroom incorporating wetland areas as mandated by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division—this will enable the classroom to be used cooperatively with local schools and Dalton State College. The anchor facility will be a lodge which will generate revenue through rentals for meetings, weddings, and other special occasions. A 2,000-sq.ft. deck will overlook the lake and a 5,000 sq.ft. main area inside will seat 150-175 for major banquets and have partitioning for smaller functions. The lodge will also have a full kitchen, a welcome area and rental desk, and a classroom. In partnership with the Dalton Convention Center it will operate in a fashion similar to that of the Dalton-Whitfield Senior Center.

Anticipated construction costs (real ones cannot be determined until the bidding process closes) total $5 million, including $1.2 million set aside for contingencies, and construction could proceed in phases as funds become available. If the lodge is built, annual maintenance and operation expenses are estimated to be $141,000, with revenues of $129,880; without the lodge (having only a small rental shack), M & O costs would be $91,000, with revenues of $18,000. All these figures reflect conservative estimates of staffing needs and rental income.

Projected to open in early 2018, the finished project would be unique in the region and a magnet for young professionals and entrepreneurs, both those who grew up in Dalton and others contemplating a move here. For this demographic cohort, quality of life is a paramount consideration, and parks are central to realizing that ideal. DPRD has a history of successful partnerships with other entities, and this one will be no different from past engagements.

Announcements

President Bruce reminded members to vote on January 10. He announced that Past Presidents of the Club will meet today for further discussion of the Club’s upcoming 80th anniversary. He noted that hosts are needed for the Golden Gates, a performing group of young Russians whose appearance in several area schools between January 26 and February 3 is being sponsored by both the Dalton and the Carpet City Rotary Clubs. Finally, he recognized Dr. Onsy Bestawros as the Club’s newest Paul Harris Fellow and Past President Dr. John Richmond, who has qualified for his third Paul Harris Fellowship.


Dr. Onsy Bestawros and Dr. John Richmond



January 10th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) 14-Jan    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Kelehear, Pat Kelehear, Leon S. 12-Jan  
McCoy, Barbara McCoy, Norman D. 14-Jan  
Wright, Betty Wright, William B. Jr. 14-Jan  
Schneller, Douglas Schneller, April D 15-Jan  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Bestawros, Onsy A (ONSY) Hilda 12-Jan 42
Henson, Paul E. Jr.(PAUL) Jean 13-Jan 55


First United Methodist Church Children's Choir



By Kathryn Sellers

Rotarians were delighted by the sweet voices of twenty one children from First United Methodist Church’s children’s choir. The 6-9-year olds sang beautifully under the direction of Nicole Harbin and Jeff Harbin and with the piano accompaniment of Donna Barclay.



They sang a series of familiar carols including I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day, It Came Upon the Midnight Clear and Hark the Herald Angels Sing and ended with secular songs Jingle Bells with the sound of ringing bells and finally We Wish You a Merry Christmas. If we were not before, this placed all in a spirit of Christmas.



 



January 3rd Birthdays and Anniversaries



Member Birthdays Birthday    
Didier, John M. (JOHN) 4-Jan    
Smalley, Robert H. (ROBERT) 4-Jan    
Kelehear, Leon S. (SPARKY) 7-Jan    
Kirkman, Lowell D. (LOWELL) 9-Jan    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Farmer, Sierra Farmer, Joseph 3-Jan  
Burt, Roger Burt, Amanda 5-Jan  
Schwell, Judy Schwenn, John O. 7-Jan  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Aft, David (DAVID) Pauline 3-Jan 3
Brantley, Traylor M (TRAY) Valerie (VAL) 6-Jan 11
Brantley, Valerie K (VAL) Tray 7-Jan 11
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) Ricky 8-Jan 17
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) Cherri 8-Jan 17
Minor, John Thomas V(JOHN) Laura 8-Jan 12


Announcement


Announcement

Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead announced the formation of a 501(c)3 fund to enable the Club to expand the role it plays in the betterment of our community by underwriting charitable work for those who need work done such as ramps, roofing, etc. In concert with the Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia, we have established a fund titled “Rotary Club of Dalton Charities” to allow us to fund worthy projects, working with other agencies such as Rebuilding Hope, the Baptist Men's Ramp Group, and the Methodist Men's Group. We all have a common goal of providing service to the community in various forms. Frank asked that as members look at their year-end giving, they please consider making a tax-exempt contribution to this fund, making any checks out to The Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia with “Rotary Charities” noted on the memo line, or they may be payable directly to the Rotary Club of Dalton.



Christmas Music From The First Baptist Church Men's Ensemble


By John Hutcheson

Dr. Sherwood Jones introduced the First Baptist Church Men’s Ensemble, whose annual Christmas visit has been a part of the Club’s holiday observances for more than two decades. This year the group appears with a new Director, Mrs. Susan Deal, Minister of Music at First Baptist for the past five years, and it also includes two new members with Rotary connections: Ron Nix, formerly of our club and a founder of the Carpet Capital Rotary Club, and Chip Sellers, whose father was a long-time member of our club and whose stepmother, Kathryn, is a current member. Others in the Ensemble include Randy Poplin, Paul Anderson, Bryan McAllister, Arthur Bridges, and Andrew Moore.


First Baptist Men's Ensemble

The Ensemble sang five pieces, including “Angels We Have Heard on High,” “Ding Dong Merrily on High,” “Coventry Carol,” “I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” Although their red sweaters familiar from past years had been replaced by dark jackets and ties, their performances, as always, earned enthusiastic applause.

Announcements

Rotarian Bitsy McFarland welcomed Crystal Tee’s parents and brother who arrived in Dalton after a 27-hour trip from Malaysia to attend Crystal’s graduation from Dalton State this week and are staying as Bitsy’s houseguests. President Bruce again reported that $3,641 was collected in extra donations to the polio fund, which will also receive $4,800 this year from the Club’s regular monthly contribution of $10 per member. Speaking for Past President Bill Bowen, Smitty Barnett reminded members to sign up to ring the Salvation Army Christmas Bell at the Walmart Marketplace.



December 20th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) 1-Jan    
Woodward, Philip F (PHIL) 20-Dec    
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) 26-Dec    
DeLay, Scott G (SCOTT) 30-Dec    
Parrott, V DeForrest III (DEFORREST) 30-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Blackman, Linda Blackman, Bill M 1-Jan  
Farmer, Sierra Farmer, Joseph 3-Jan  
Taylor, Joanie Taylor, Zachary 24-Dec  
Cooke, Cathy Cooke, Christopher M 24-Dec  
McLeod, Carolyn (CAROL) McLeod, Robert S. 27-Dec  
Sanders, Mary Etta Sanders, Drayton M II 28-Dec  
Minter, Melissa Minter, B. Scott 28-Dec  
Porter, Amy Porter, Gerald D 29-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Smalley, Robert H. (ROBERT) 1/1/1995 22  
Combs, William Dan (DAN) 1/1/1986 31  
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) 1/1/1976 41  
Smith, Clark C. (CLARK) 12/31/1999 17  
Rowland, Bradley Wayne (BRAD) 12/31/2001 15  
Johnson, Roy Glenn Sr.(ROY) 12/31/2002 14  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Aft, David (DAVID) Pauline 3-Jan 3
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) Sierra 20-Dec 7
Underwood, Michelle (SHELL) Anthony 20-Dec 13
McLeod, Robert S. (BOB) Carolyn (CAROL) 21-Dec 51
Rowland, Bradley Wayne (BRAD) Greta 22-Dec 26
Cope, Don (DON) Laurie 24-Dec 3
Thomas, Don R. (DON) Mary 25-Dec 2
Kirkman, Lowell D. (LOWELL) Lou 26-Dec 18
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) Nancy 27-Dec 43
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) Becky 29-Dec 49
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) Teresa 30-Dec 26


The Humane Society Of Northwest Georgia


by John Hutcheson

Devon Brooks, Executive Director of the Humane Society of Northwest Georgia (HSNG) introduced Susan Dennard, current president of the Society. Devon related that the HSNG has existed for forty years. As a 401(c)3 corporation it does not receive any financial support from either the ASPCA or local government entities, depending instead on donations, fund-raising events, and adoption fees. The HSNG is not part of nor affiliated with Whitfield County Animal Control but it does rescue animals from the county agency, where short-term retention policies lead to a high-kill ratio.



Devon Brooks

The HSNG depends very heavily on volunteers, needing 13,000 volunteer hours per year just to care for its animals and maintain a humane environment, not counting time spent on adoption processes. Most of its animals come from the county’s Animal Control, but some are surrendered by owners who no longer want or are able to care for them. Currently the Society is receiving a record number of calls about cruelty to animals, and it often works with the Sheriff’s office to remove such animals from bad treatment or unacceptable conditions. There are no set limits for animal retention in the Society’s shelter, and some special needs cases may stay for lengthy periods.

The Society can provide assistance for all sorts of situations involving animals. For example, it partners with Meals on Wheels to provide food for companion animals belonging to that program’s clients, and it has placed two dogs at the Regional Youth Detention Center to help residents there learn kindness by teaching them to train the animals—something which may also serve to relieve stress and moderate depression. As colonies of feral cats have become a huge problem, especially on the east side of Dalton where there are no veterinary services, the Society has launched a spaying campaign, supported by a grant from the Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia. It also provides education, pet safety materials, and food to needy pet owners.

Using slides of some of the Society’s animals and its facilities on the Cleveland Highway, Devon explained that the shelter currently houses 35 to 40 animals which are kept in crates but are walked three times per day. The buildings are old and hard to maintain and the property has no flat area really suitable for walking, but a $1.25 million capital campaign called “Unleashing the Possibilities” has raised sufficient funds to start work in early 2017 on a new facility at the intersection of Legion Drive and Veterans Drive. Projected construction time is eight months, and when completed there will be capacity for as many as 100 animals.

A Rotary Minute With Sandy McKenzie

Recently inducted Rotarian Sandy McKenzie joined Hamilton Health Care System in 2006 and has been its Chief Operating Officer since 2012. She grew up in Ringgold and earned a bachelor’s degree in respiratory therapy from Georgia State University. Married for 31 years, she has a 28-year-old son and a 23-year-old daughter. Her husband is a cabinetmaker and they have a small farm on which they are raising 30 cattle. Her son works with his father, and her daughter in studying in the public health program at Mercer University. All of her family love sports, and she is an avid Alabama fan.


Sandy McKenzie

Announcements and Awards

President Bruce reported that $3,641 was collected in extra donations to the polio fund, which will also receive $4,800 this year from the Club’s regular monthly contribution of $10 per member. He also announced today’s meeting of Past Presidents to begin planning a celebration of the Club’s 80th anniversary on July 23, 2017. Skeeter Pierce received her second Paul Harris Fellow award, and Todd Pangle was inducted into the Club by Membership Chair Tray Brantley. Past President Bill Bowen reminded members to sign up to ring the Salvation Army Christmas Bell at the Walmart Marketplace during the week beginning December 12 or to contribute at least $10 if they were unable to schedule a time to ring. He also recognized Crystal Tee, a former GRSP student under the Club’s sponsorship, who will graduate from Dalton State next week in a ceremony to be attended by her parents from Malaysia.


Skeeter Pierce and Todd Pangle



December 13th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday      
Barnwell, William L (BILL) 14-Dec      
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr. (MAURICE) 17-Dec      
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday    
Poehlman, Sally Poehlman, John H. 17-Dec    
Barnett, Tammy Barnett, George S. 18-Dec    
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years    
Minor, John Thomas V(JOHN) 12/17/2013 3    
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years  
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) Barbara 18-Dec 56  
Bailey, Philip Bates (BATES) Dell 18-Dec 45  


Providing Support For Nursing Mothers In The Workplace


Zachary Taylor, M.D., Director of the North Georgia Public Health District, opened the program by stressing the medical, social, and economic benefits of breast feeding. Babies who are given breast milk exclusively for their first six months and along with supplemental formula and food until the end of their first year are prone to be much healthier than their non-breast-fed counterparts, being significantly less likely to develop obesity, eczema, asthma, or infant sudden death syndrome. Mothers who have nursed have a lower risk of diabetes and ovarian or breast cancer. Breast feeding has been shown to save families $1,500 to $1,800 per year in formula and health care expenses, while employers benefit from having to grant fewer sick days to employees who are parents. Even so, while 75% of mothers begin breast feeding at their child’s birth, only 37% are still doing so when the child reaches six months. This is partly because cultural structures do not support breast feeding; new mothers frequently receive little instruction, hospitals generally separate mothers from their babies, and workplaces often provide little or no accommodation for female employees who wish to nurse or store pumped breast milk.


Carol Hendrix

Carol Hendrix, Breast Feeding Coordinator for the Public Health Department, used a slide presentation to reinforce the point that support for breast-feeding employees can generate a positive return on investment for employers who provide adequate accommodations. Almost 95% of expectant mothers would like to breast feed, but only 75% actually do so, and only 17.5% are still nursing when their children complete their first year. For working mothers, inconvenience is by far the greatest reason they stop breast feeding.

The Dalton area has done well in taking corrective action and has even attracted national notice for its efforts. Carol helps businesses comply with Federal law mandating accommodation for working mothers. The results have become a model for manufacturing facilities to follow, drawing on four components:

  • To work toward establishing paid maternity leave for all employed mothers
  • To ensure that employers establish lactation support programs
  • To expand facilities to support breast-feeding mothers in the workplace
  • To ensure that all child-care providers accommodate the needs of breast-feeding mothers

Nursing mothers need time and places to express and store milk for later feeding, and Carol showed a video produced by the Colorado Breast Feeding Coalition which pointed out that employees as well as employers have responsibilities to bring these about. Communication is essential, and specifying needs should be part of an early conversation between an employee and the employer about the employee’s pregnancy, taking place prior to the employee’s request for maternity leave. This will enable the employer to make adequate and timely arrangements, which in turn should produce the benefit of enhanced employee loyalty.

By way of providing a local example of appropriate action, Carol concluded the program by showing a video about what has been done at Shaw Industries.

Announcements

Past President Bill Bowen announced that a sign-up sheet was available in the lobby for Club members who want to volunteer to ring the Salvation Army Christmas bell at the Walmart Marketplace in Bryman Plaza during the week beginning on December 12. President Bruce noted that a group of the Club’s past presidents would meet on December 6 to begin planning observances of the Club’s 80th anniversary in 2017. He also read two thank-you notes from children whom the Club had helped attend the Space Camp last summer. Finally, he awarded Rotarian Ricky Robertson his Blue Badge.


President Bruce and Ricky Robertson



December 6th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) 6-Dec    
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) 11-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Parrott, Eugenia Parrott, V DeForrest III 10-Dec  
McClure, Storm McClure, Douglas E 12-Dec  
Pratt, Shaun Pratt, Vallarie D. 12-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) Denise 6-Dec 41
Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr.(MAURICE) Betty 7-Dec 48
Johnson, Larry Alan (LARRY) Kathy 8-Dec 32
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) Joanne 12-Dec 57


The Northwest Georgia Family Crisis Center


By John Hutcheson

President Bruce introduced Amanda Cunningham, Assistant Director of the Northwest Georgia Family Crisis Center. The Center serves a comprehensive range of victims--female and male, children and adults—who suffer from any kind of domestic violence, and as this social disorder grows, the need for such a facility is intensifying. Georgia currently ranks ninth among the states in reported incidences of domestic violence, which causes hundreds of deaths annually nationwide—in Whitfield County alone there were five during the past year.

Amanda has been with the Northwest Georgia Family Crisis for four years, assisting in its services to Whitfield, Murray, and Gordon Counties. One of 46 such agencies across the state, the Center is funded by grants from state and federal sources, the United Way, and private donations. It presently has 24 beds which will be used for emergencies after another dozen beds are added, for a total of 36. All services are free and available as needed through telephones staffed on a 24/7 basis. Among the Center’s current clients are sixteen children, and because it is now running well beyond capacity, its expenses are $70,000 over budget.


Amanda Cunningham

The world of the Family Crisis Center differs from that of the Department of Family and Children’s Services. Most domestic victims are female, and consequently many of its informational programs are aimed specially toward women. No one is compelled to remain at the Center—clients may leave at will—and many women feel compelled to return to abusive environments because of concern for their children, animals, finances, or other matters. The Center tries to accommodate these where possible (even to the extent of finding caretakers for pets and other animals), but it may nevertheless take a victim as many as seven attempts to permanently leave an abusive situation. How long a client might stay in the Center varies with circumstances. While something within ninety days is the norm, some have remained as long as six or seven months. Children who have been traumatized by witnessing abuse, or by experiencing an abrupt change in their living situations, often need particular help to regain some measure of stability, and the Center accordingly provides appropriate play and study areas. With the assistance of Shaw Industries and other corporations, the Center stages events for children around holidays and on other occasions, and during summers it sponsors Camp High Hope, hosted in recent years by St. Mark’s Episcopal Church.

Along with its care for victims, the Center works to spread awareness of domestic and other kinds of interpersonal violence. It is present on social media such as Facebook and Instagram, and recently its representatives have spoken in local high schools out of a growing concern about dating violence among teenagers. It annually sponsors two major fundraisers, the Walk-a-Mile event and the Holiday Tour of Homes. Although the Center’s location is confidential, donations of Christmas toys or other items to support its work may be made by arrangement for pickup or by leaving them at the United Way office on Thornton Avenue. Amanda closed by thanking the Club for the assistance it has given to the Center over the years and in its recent drive for household and personal goods to help clients to resume their independence.

A Rotary Minute with Cherri Robertson

Cherri Robertson, who was inducted into the Club along with her husband, Ricky, this past July 19th, was born in North Carolina and is proud to be of 16% Native American extraction. She and Ricky have been married for seventeen years and have two children, ages sixteen and ten. She has sold insurance for sixteen years and has been involved in many local organizations—currently she is an officer in the Southeast Whitfield High School Raider Nation and also president of the Basketball Tipoff Club. With her family she is active at New Hope Baptist Church, and in her spare time—which is rare—she enjoys reading and photography.


Cherri Robertson

Announcements

President Bruce announced that the auction for the Swedish china bowl has closed, with himself submitting the winning bid of $175. This amount will be added to the total for the special polio collection, which will be announced after its final calculation.



November 29th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Barnett, George S. (SMITTY) 1-Dec    
Venable, Margaret H. (MARGARET) 1-Dec    
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) 4-Dec    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Maret, Carla Maret, Michael S. 3-Dec  
Mooney, Bobby Mooney, Patricia H 5-Dec  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Blevins, Sheri H. (SHERI) 11/29/2005 11  
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) 11/29/2005 11  
Hutcheson, John A. Jr.(JOHN) 11/29/2005 11  
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) 11/29/2005 11  
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) 11/29/2005 11  
Kirkman, Lowell D. (LOWELL) 12/1/1972 44  
Henson, Paul E. Jr.(PAUL) 12/1/1968 48  
Brooker, Robert H. (BOB) 12/1/1976 40  
Clark, M Michael (MIKE) 12/1/1980 36  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Minter, B. Scott (SCOTT) Melissa 29-Nov 19
Jones, J Sherwood III(SHERWOOD) Danielle 2-Dec 21
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) Kayanne 3-Dec 28
Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr.(PAUL) Alicia 5-Dec 24


The Rotary Foundation: Some Reminders


by John Hutcheson

Rotarian Greg Dent, the Club’s Foundation Chair, showed three videos by way of reminding members about the work of the Rotary Foundation, especially its effort to eliminate polio.  The 2017 will mark the Foundation’s centennial anniversary, and the first video, entitled “Our Century of Doing Good,” recounted how the Foundation has spent over three billion dollars since its establishment in 1917.  Its first grant, made in 1930, went to disabled children, and now it is on the verge of making polio a thing of the past.  In addition, the Foundation supports six Peace Centers to foster international understanding. 
 
Greg noted that since its inception in 1937 the Rotary Club of Dalton has given more than $427,000 to the Foundation and now has 65 Paul Harris Fellows who have each given at least $1,000 to the Foundation.  He showed a second video, “Why Zero Matters,” which summarized Rotary’s work in bringing down the worldwide incidence of polio from 350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 in 2015 and providing immunizations for 2.5 million children.  A third video gave a first-person account of an African polio victim who has been assisted by Rotary and is now a Paralympics champion runner.


Greg Dent

A Special Veterans Day Commemoration

President Bruce recognized and thanked all of the Club’s veterans for their service and called on Rotarian Pat Townsend for a brief presentation about his father’s experiences in World War II.  Rembert Townsend was one of six brothers, four of whom served in the military, and at one time in 1943 three of them were simultaneously posted overseas.  Pat has all of his dad’s letters, and he read from several of these, accompanied by photos, to provide glimpses of what one soldier saw in the Western European Theater during the last year of the war. 
 
Rembert Townsend sailed from New York on June 22, 1944 aboard the Queen Elizabeth—then the world’s largest ship—with 13,000 other troops.  After six weeks in England his unit landed in Normandy on August 4 and was attached to General Patton’s Third Army, XX Corps.  They fought to within eighteen miles of Paris before being sent to the Argonne sector and subsequently across the Rhine, where they saw the total devastation of many German towns.  Rembert’s outfit then reinforced the 19th Division and spent 49 days shelling to soften up the area around Metz.
 
In another letter, dated September 25, 1944, Rembert told of a visit from Bing Crosby.  At that point he had not seen much combat, although he had seen a good deal of France.  On December 12 he narrowly missed transfer to a unit that soon became involved in the Battle of the Bulge, where the man who’d been selected was killed.  When the European war ended in May, 1945, he worried about being sent to the Pacific Theater, but instead he was able to return home and on February 12, 1946 he married the woman who became Pat’s mother. 


Pat Townsend

Announcements
 
President Bruce announced that the best spellers in the Whitfield Education Foundation’s Celebrity Spelling Bee last week were all from among the six Rotarians who participated, including the winner, Scott DeLay.  He thanked Smitty Barnett for his work with the Spelling Bee and also on behalf of the Salvation Army food drive.  That project ends today, as does the special collection for polio eradication.  The auction for the Swedish china bowl remains open for bids, with proceeds going to the polio fund.
 
Past President John Richmond called upon Rotarian Larry Winter and the Club’s current GRSP student, Fredrik Mazur, in order to award Larry a Will Watt Fellowship for having contributed $1,000 or more to the GRSP Endowment.  The Endowment’s corpus now stands at just under $13,000,000, enabling it to grant $1,950 to each of this year’s GRSP students.


Larry Winter and Fredrik Mazur

November 15th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) 16-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Miller, Sara Miller, Charles Dalton 15-Nov  
Dickson, Sherry Dickson, Thomas S. 15-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) 11/20/2012 4 4
Little, William Norris Sr.(NORRIS) 11/20/2001 15 15
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA) 11/20/2012 4 4
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Martin, Richard G. (RICK) Sandy 20-Nov 51
Partain, Jack (JACK) Pam 21-Nov 30
Campbell, J Carl (CARL) Kristy 21-Nov 15


The Northwest Georgia Autism Initiative


By John Hutcheson
 
Rotarian Pat Townsend introduced Rotarian Greg Dent and Past President David Aft for a presentation on a recent project to provide support for autistic persons and their families in Northwest Georgia.  Greg is Director of the Northwest Georgia Healthcare Partnership and David is President of the Community Foundation of Northwest Georgia.
 
Pointing out that autism is an important issue at both the national and local levels, David stressed that it exists from mild to severe degrees, so that each autistic patient has a unique configuration and each family whose lives are affected by autism has unique needs.  Representatives of the local autism community approached the Community Foundation for assistance and the Foundation’s leadership turned to the Healthcare Partnership for advice, making a small grant which led to formation of the Northwest Georgia Autism Initiative and its goal of understanding and addressing the autism group’s needs and issues.
 
Greg explained that the Initiative’s strategy has three phases:  learning and organizing, engaging constituents and exploring programs, and establishing a full-service autism center.  By way of learning, the Healthcare Partnership has completed a 148-page study (available on its website) covering nine counties in Northwest Georgia and showing the current system of autism care in the region to be very disjointed.  The population of students having developmental disabilities is broken out by school systems, but these numbers only show those persons who have been diagnosed, and diagnosis itself is an issue, heavily influenced by the economic, social, and structural dimensions of family situations.  Comparison of the Georgia Autism Plan with the work of the Chattanooga Autism Center shows that Georgia provides significantly more services than the Chattanooga agency, with which there are qualitative differences as well.  For example, Chattanooga is stronger on family support services but not on early screening and identification or financial support for treatment.
 
David noted that such disparities between the Georgia Autism Plan and what’s available at the nearest autism center reinforce the urgency of Northwest Georgia’s autism needs.  At the same time, though, the region covered in the Healthcare Partnership study has plentiful resources for developing a center of its own.  The next task is to marshal these resources and build an income stream which will support programs to engage members of the autism community through things such as recreational events designed for autistic participants, conferences for caregivers, etc.  Encouragingly, several corporations and agencies have already expressed willingness to help financially and otherwise. 
 
Ultimately the goal is to establish a full-service autism center that will likely draw clients from an area extending beyond Northwest Georgia to Atlanta’s northern suburbs and west into Alabama, holding a population of 700,000 to 800,000.  Doing so will take time—twelve to eighteen months is a reasonable estimate for developing a business plan and another three years or so to complete the full project.  Meanwhile, it’s necessary to build an “army of advocates” who can unite their passion with resources and action.

A Rotary Minute with Valerie Brantley
 
Rotarian Valerie Brantley, who was inducted into the Club this past September 27th, related that as a military child she had moved frequently while growing up, but she regards Vero Beach, Florida, as her hometown since she graduated from high school there.  After earning an undergraduate degree in English and a law degree from Mercer University, she moved to Dalton and joined the Minor, Bell firm, with whom she continues to work as general counsel for Hamilton Medical Center.  She is the mother of a six-year-old daughter and a three-year-old son.  Her favorite author is William Faulkner, and she collects pug dog Christmas ornaments—she has a special love for pugs.  When she reaches retirement she wants to work in dog rescue and do pro bono legal work for juvenile causes. 

Announcements
 
President Bruce noted that the special collection in observance of World Polio Day and the food drive for the Salvation Army have been extended, as has the silent auction for a collector’s plate from Sweden.  He also reminded members about the Celebrity Spelling Bee to be held this evening in support of the Whitfield Educational Foundation, with several Rotarians participating.
 
Past President John Richmond reported that the Club’s GRSP donation of $50 per year per member generated a surplus contribution of $1993.95 which the GRSP office has returned to the Club. 

Earl Lusk Memorial Golf Tournament


The annual Earl Lusk Memorial Golf Tournament will be held April 11th, 2017 at the Dalton
Golf & Country Club to benefit our Rotary Scholarship Programs for area students.

Team entries for four-person teams are available for $600 or individual entries are available
for $150 each.

Sponsorship opportunities are also available. 

Click here for more information and to sign up online to enter a team, an individual player,
or to register as a sponsor. 

November 8th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Bradham, Robert L. (ROB) 8-Nov    
Dobbins, Chuck (CHUCK) 8-Nov    
Townsend, Patrick J (PAT) 14-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Campbell, Kristy Campbell, J Carl 11-Nov  
Hawkins, Nancy Hawkins, Jim R. 11-Nov  
Morehouse, Dianne Morehouse, Gordon C. 12-Nov  
Cope, Laurie Cope, Don 13-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) 11/10/2015 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) S. G. 12-Nov 28


Human Trafficking


By Ty Ross
 
Desperate for a job, she is offered a way out of her rural village. She is told a new life and a job in another place await her. When she gets there, her dream is shattered by the reality that she is a slave.
 
Rotarian John Neal introduced native Daltonian, Tiffany Adkinson, who put her nursing career on hold to pursue her heartfelt desire to end human trafficking. Tiffany is now the Executive Director of Freedom’s Promise, a non-profit corporation based in Nashville, TN with a mission to prevent human trafficking and child exploitation in Cambodia through individually community development programs, resulting in trafficking-free zones.


Tiffany Adkinson
 
Why Cambodia? Tiffany explained that Cambodia ranks third for the highest estimated prevalence of modern slavery per capita (Global Slavery Index, 2015). While strides have been made, children under the age of 16 once accounted for as many as 35% of the sexually exploited in Cambodia (UNICEF). What causes this? A history of war and genocide has left the country in shambles. High levels of poverty and a lack of job opportunities have resulted in cross-border migration. Cambodia also suffers from broken gender roles, corruption, a broken justice system and ill-equipped leadership. These are among the factors increasing the nation’s vulnerability to trafficking and exploitation. As a result, an estimated 256,800 live in slavery in Cambodia. Brokenness and poverty continuously feed this cycle of oppression.
 
Freedom’s Promise is taking steps to prevent the cyclical disease of human trafficking. Freedom’s Promise works with partners in Cambodia to meet the physical, emotional and spiritual needs in communities where many have been robbed of hope and joy. The communities Freedom’s Promise assists are mostly rural, strategically located in close proximity to the Thailand border. The Freedom’s Promise plan is five-fold. It fosters community through medical outreach, public outreach broadcasts and safe playgrounds for children to play. It restores hearts by empowering local churches and teaching men respectful behaviors. It educates children both in primary school and after-school care. It equips future leaders with health education and supplies housing to many seeking to further at universities. It provides vocational training to women so that they have more choices and it connects artisans to global markets to provide opportunities and spur economic growth.
 
Thanks to the good work of Freedom’s Promise Tiffany is proud to report the following:
 
  • 24 future leaders have been supported during university years
  • 1,800 children have received education
  • 4,900 people have received medical care
  • 120 women have received vocational training
  • 1,058 people have grown in knowledge of the Gospel
  • 400 children have access to safe play spaces
  • 2,860 families have access to a local church
  • 54 leaders have been trained in community health education
Thank you Tiffany Atkinson!


April 4th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Anderson, Michael S (MICHAEL) 4-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
McDonald, Frances McDonald, David L 5-Apr  
Ross, Jen Ross, James Tyson 8-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Blackman, Linda T. (LINDA) 4/9/2013 4  
Carter, Teresa (TERESA) 4/9/2013 4  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Smith, Ralph (RALPH) Sandra 7-Apr 34
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) Cindy 8-Apr 17


The Community Strategic Plan Of


By John Hutcheson
 
President Bruce introduced Rotarian Rob Bradham, President of the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce.  Born in Charlotte, NC, Rob grew up in the Tidewater Virginia area.  After earning a degree in history from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, he worked with one of Virginia’s largest trade association management companies and later with the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce before moving to the Chattanooga Chamber as its vice president of public strategies.  In November, 2015 he assumed his position in Dalton, where he was joined at the end of the school year by his wife Melissa and their two sons.
 
Rob set out three objectives for his presentation to the Club:  to summarize his family’s experience moving from Chattanooga to Dalton, to describe the Dalton Chamber’s strategic plan, and to tell a story.  He declared that Dalton is the most welcoming community of the ten or so he has lived in, and he specially praised Brookwood Elementary School, where his son is enrolled in the fourth grade and which he called a “shining star” in Dalton.  Along with the persuasive powers of Skeeter Pierce and Amy Cole, the strengths of Brookwood overcame his family’s reluctance to leave Chattanooga.  Now living at Ryman Farm, they love the safety of the community and the sense of freedom it gives them.  His boys have also become avid fans of Dalton High football.
 

Rob Branham
 
During his first three or four months in Dalton Rob was on a listening tour, attending more than a hundred meetings to learn the community’s expectations of him and the Chamber under his leadership.  He became familiar with Dalton’s history—“a story many other towns would kill to have”—leading up to the boom years of the 1970’s and 1980’s and the Great Recession of the last decade.
 
Although Dalton’s industrial productivity has recovered from the disastrous downturn that began in 2009, there’s still a “recession hangover.”  Nevertheless, many businesses desire to plan for the future optimistically, and the Chamber wants to be at the forefront of this process.  Its recent Community Survey has been completed by 2,218 respondents, a remarkable return rate when compared with that of other jurisdictions such as Gwinnett County, where a much larger population generated only about 2,000 returns.  Analysis of Dalton’s data is underway and results should be available within the next week or so. 
 
Planning for Dalton’s economic future will be formulated by a committee of twenty-one business and civic leaders chaired by Chuck Dobbins and Bryan Hair.  Scheduled to wrap up by May, 2017, it will focus on three areas:
 
  • Workforce development and education.  This is Issue No. 1 and crucial to avoid losing potential employers who require highly skilled workers.
  • Economic growth and diversification to minimize adverse effects of the economic cycle.
  • Downtown redevelopment, given high priority by many as a means for improving the local quality of life.
 
The nearby examples of Rome and Chattanooga show that a project along these lines has the potential to achieve great things and could shape the history of Dalton over the next thirty years.
 
By way of a story, Rob briefly recounted the history of the Moccasin Bend Task Force and its role in revitalizing the Chattanooga waterfront.  In the early 1908’s Chattanooga’s river frontage was blighted, and when the Task Force was formed in 1982 the initial idea was to encourage industrial development, especially on the Moccasin Bend peninsula.  This was soon abandoned in view of that area’s scenic and historic character, and the Task Force turned instead to redevelopment on a wider scale over a stretch of the Tennessee River extending from the Gorge to the Chickamauga Dam.  “Return to the River” served as the slogan and guiding concept.
 
In 1985 the Task Force issued a report which projected all that’s been built and accomplished over the last thirty years—the Tennessee Aquarium, a 22-mile Riverwalk, the Creative Discovery Museum, Ross’s Landing, Coolidge Park, new downtown housing (now comprising more than 1,200 units), pedestrianizing the Walnut Street Bridge, and formation of a non-profit private corporation, the River City Company, to raise funding.  Since 1985 $250 million has been spent on specific projects envisioned by the Task Force, and the River City Company has brought in $3.5 billion to redevelop Chattanooga’s downtown.
 
Rob pointed out that plans of this sort take time and require patience and commitment, but he believes Dalton has a better story to tell than either Chattanooga or Rome—he has staked his career on it.  One lesson that’s been learned is, “Build it for your citizens.”  If local needs and desires are satisfied in an excellent way, tourists and other outsiders will come of their own accord.  Dalton can’t compete on equal terms with Chattanooga as an attractor for young professionals, but its characteristic strengths—quality education, safe environments, and a low cost of living—make it an ideal place for young families to settle.

A Rotary Minute With Celeste Creswell

Rotarian Celeste Creswell, recently a candidate for a judgeship on the Whitfield County Superior Court, grew up in Cohutta and has practiced law for twenty years, specializing in civil litigation and mediation.  Licensed in Georgia and Tennessee, she works for an Atlanta law firm in its Dalton office in the Landmark Building, handling commercial litigation and mediation; intellectual property, construction, eminent domain, landlord-tenant, and real estate matters; and class action and appellate litigation.


Celeste Creswell

Announcements and Presentations
 
President Bruce reminded members about the special collection in observance of World Polio Day and told about Rotarians’ help to complete an access ramp at the home of a local disabled person.  Smitty Barnett pointed to the ongoing food drive for the Salvation Army, noting that more than 700 families had been fed in September alone and this number would grow as the holidays approach.  He also promoted the Celebrity Spelling Bee to be held on November 1 in support of the Whitfield Educational Foundation; several Rotarians will be participating.
 
Membership Chairman Tray Brantley introduced Douglas McClure, Mark Mixer, Gerald Porter, and April Schneller for induction into Rotary by President Bruce.

November 1st Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Bowling, John (JOHN) 6-Nov    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Richmond, Agnes Richmond, John D. 2-Nov  
Kirkman, Lou Kirkman, Lowell D. 4-Nov  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Abernathy, Sid G. (SID) 11/1/1977 39  
Jolly, Hilliard R. (HILLIARD) 11/1/1989 27  
Chandler, Robert M. (ROBERT) 11/1/1978 38  
Neal, John P. III(JOHN) 11/1/1980 36  
Stewart, Bob T (BOB) 11/1/1981 35  
Morehouse, Gordon C. (GORDON) 11/1/1982 34  
Pennington, David E. (DAVID) 11/1/1985 31  
Barnwell, William L (BILL) 11/1/1972 44  
Campbell, J Carl (CARL) 11/3/2015 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Rhoden, W Scott (SCOTT) Dina 7-Nov 19


A Day To Honor Our Own


President Bruce opened the meeting with a demonstration of the new electronic podium (although the sound system remains problematic) and then introduced a slide show of the March 11 track meet made by Rotarian Bob McLeod.

Vocational Service Chair Scott Minter presided over announcement of the Club’s nominees for two of District 6910’s greatest honors, the W. Lee Arrendale Vocational Excellence Award and the Robert S. Stubbs Guardian of Ethics Award. The selection was made by a committee of seven Rotarians, including Steve Farrow, Skeeter Pierce, Bill Bowen, John Neal, David Aft, Kevin Brunson, and President Bruce Satterfield.

The Arrendale Award recognizes Lee Arrendale, a Rotarian from Habersham County who was a recognized leader in the Georgia poultry industry and served his state as Chairman of the Georgia Board of Corrections. Guidelines for the award in his name require the nominee to show excellence in his or her vocation, achievements in the community, and academic excellence.

For 2017-2018 the Rotary Club of Dalton nominates Don Adcock. Born in Monroe, Georgia, Don graduated from Monroe Area High School, where he participated in football, baseball, and track. In 1969 he married Diane Kiker, with whom he has had two sons and a daughter. He began his career in 1968 with the Coca-Cola Company as a trade examiner, and in 1970 he moved to the Travelers Insurance Company. A year later he settled into his current role as a self-employed insurance agent in Dalton, and he is currently CEO of Adcock Financial Group, Inc., providing employee benefits along with personal insurance and investments to employers and executives. He was twice the lead agent for Franklin Life in volume of insurance sold, and he is Past President of both the Dalton Association of Life Underwriters and the Cherokee Area Estate Planning Council. In 2013 he received the Small Business Person Award from the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce. He has been a member of the Dalton Rotary Club since 1979 and has served on its Board of Directors. He is a Past Board Member of Big Brothers/Big Sisters, and presently he serves on the board of the Hamilton Healthcare System and the Whitfield Healthcare Foundation, where he is a Life Associate Board Member.


Don Adcock

The Stubbs Award, named for Robert (Bob) Stubbs, a member of the Rotary Club of Canton, honors a person who has been a Rotarian for at least three years and has made outstanding contributions in his or her vocation while also strengthening and fostering the development of ethical practices by actions, writing, policies, and public pronouncements. This year’s nominee from the Rotary Club of Dalton is Roger Williams.

Roger has been a pillar of the Dalton business and political community for over fifty years and a member of the Dalton Rotary Club since 1978. He has been married to Joann for 62 years, and they have four children, eight grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.


Roger Williams


A graduate of North Georgia College in business administration, Roger served as an infantry captain in the U.S. Army from 1954 to 1962, with tours of duty in Germany and Vietnam. He returned to Dalton in 1963 to join Credit Services, Inc,, a company which he grew to six branches and of which he has been president for more than fifty years. For twenty-two years Roger served Whitfield County in the Georgia House of Representatives, from 1977 to 1986 with membership on the Ways and Means and Industrial Relations committees, and from 2001 to 2012, when he served as chairman of the Regulated Industries Committee and as a member of the Energy, Utilities, and Telecommunications Committee, the Industrial Relations Committee , and again on Ways and Means. In 2012 Georgia Trend magazine named him one of the 100 Most Influential Georgians.

In the local community, Roger is a former member of the Family Support Council. Professionally, he has been a director of the Georgia Financial Services Association, past-president of the Georgia Industrial Loan Association, a member of the National Federation of Independent Businesses, and a member of the board and executive committee of the Georgia Community Bank. He continues to serve his community and the state as a member of the State Transportation Board, to which he was elected in 2013.

Roger received additional recognition from Fran Randolph of Trenton, Georgia, representing Quilts of Valor, an organization founded by a Blue Star mother in 2003 to honor service members and veterans. Since then it has given out more than 153,000 hand-sewn quilts to recognize sacrifices made in the name of freedom and to provide comfort as a sign of appreciation. For his military service, a quilt was ceremoniously placed on Roger’s shoulders to applause from the Club.


Williams and Fran Rudolph

Following these awards, Rotarian Lynn Laughter presented a banner from the Vienna International Rotary Club which she had obtained during a recent trip to Austria. She noted that this club meets at the famous Hotel Sacher in Vienna and that her meal there had cost forty euros, or about forty-three dollars.


Lynn Laughter

President Bruce concluded the meeting by presenting blue badges to Vallarie Pratt, Patricia Chute, and Cheryl Creswell.


President Bruce, Vallarie Pratt, Patricia Chute, and Cheryl Creswell



March 28th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Schneller, April D (APRIL) 1-Apr    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Martin, Sandy Martin, Richard G. 1-Apr  
Hogshead, Carolyn Hogshead, Frank M. 2-Apr  
Williams, Joann Williams, Roger 2-Apr  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) 3/30/2010 7  
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) 3/30/2010 7  
Partain, Jack (JACK) 4/1/1989 28  
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) 4/1/2008 9  
Temples, Coy H (COY) 4/1/1978 39  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
No anniversaries this period.  


Rotarty R&R


By John Hutcheson

On October 18 Dalton Rotarians took a break from their usual lunch buffet and programming to enjoy some cookout fare and informal R & R, for which President-Elect Kevin Brunson is to be thanked for arranging.  A table display of photos and mementos from the Club’s past support of international causes and local projects encouraged members to make special donations in observance of World Polio Day on October 24 and Rotary International’s work to eradicate the last few instances of this dread disease.    



October 25th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 10/25/16 to 10/31/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Jones, J. Sherwood Jr. (SHERWOOD) 29-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
No Partner birthdays this period.  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Hogshead, Frank M. (FRANK) 10/26/1999 16  
Trivino, Jessica K. (JESSICA) 10/27/2015 0  
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) 10/27/2015 0  
Aft, David (DAVID) 10/29/1996 19  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Burt, Amanda (AMANDA) Roger 30-Oct 16


Climbing the Matterhorn


By John Hutcheson

Program Chair Henry Tharpe introduced Susan Dennard, who recently climbed the Matterhorn. In 1989 Susan and her husband came to Dalton where he practiced medicine with Past President John Richmond. They have three grown children, and she is currently president of the Humane Society.

Susan began by showing an ice axe and helmet she used on her climb. Located on the border between Switzerland and Italy near the town of Zermatt, the Matterhorn is 14,700 feet high and probably the most recognizable peak in the Alps.


Susan Dennard

Her father had always wanted to climb the Matterhorn, and when he was 69, after a month of training Susan and her husband went to the mountain with him in 1983, but bad weather prevented them from climbing it. Thirty years later, after her father had passed away, she decided to climb it in his memory, even though she still had no rock-climbing experience. She returned to Switzerland in 2014, but once again the mountain was closed to climbers because of weather conditions. In 2015, after climbing the Grand Teton in Wyoming, she determined to make another attempt at the Matterhorn and went back in August, 2016. She prepared for Alpine climbing by ascending the Mönch, a peak of 13,474 feet between the Eiger and the Jungfrau, and fortunately had good weather for another try at the Matterhorn, carrying a picture of her father along with her.

Even for experienced climbers, use of a guide on the Matterhorn is highly advisable. Most of the guides are Swiss, and between June and September they may go up the mountain as frequently as two or three times a week. Ideally a climb will begin around 5:00 a.m., departing from a rest hut at 10,400 feet, so that the last and most difficult leg ascends 4,000 feet. At that hour it will still be dark, so that the first stages require headlamps and a good deal of cautious groping. Each year three or four persons die on the Matterhorn, but if all goes well, a climb from the hut should take about five hours for the ascent and five-and-a-half hours for the descent, concluding in the early afternoon. The views from the peak are spectacular, but very windy conditions and a temperature of 32o when Susan reached it discouraged a prolonged stay. The descent was more dangerous than the ascent since it sometimes required going backwards while being tired from going up.

Susan illustrated her presentation with a fascinating slide show and deeply impressed many members by her adventuresomeness.

Announcements

President Bruce thanked everyone who helped at the track meet on March 11 and reminded members that items are needed for the goody bags to be given to participants in the golf tournament on April 11—each bag should be worth about $75.00. President-Elect Kevin asked anyone interested in serving on the Board for 2017-1018 to contact him as soon as possible. Membership Chair Cherri Robertson introduced Michael Anderson for induction into the Club, sponsored by Janice Kiker.


Michael Anderson

President Bruce returned to remind everyone about the upcoming Hamilton Business Alliance program.

 

 

 



March 21st Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Brantley, Valerie K (VAL) 21-Mar    
Sutherland, George W. (GEORGE) 27-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Brantley, Valerie (VAL) Brantley, Traylor M 21-Mar  
Woodward, Betty Woodward, Philip F. 21-Mar  
Pangle, Belinda Pangle, William T 24-Mar  
Gazaway, Johnnie Gazaway, Kristie 24-Mar  
Stewart, Celeste Stewart, Robert T 25-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) 3/26/2013 4  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Jones, Kelly McDonald (KELLY) Patrick 25-Mar 22


Dalton's Junior Achievement Business Ethics Program


By John Hutcheson
 
Rotarian Jessica Trivino, Director of Junior Achievement of Northwest Georgia, grew up as a minister’s daughter and came to Dalton in 2007 to attend Dalton State College, majoring in business administration.  Going into work in the non-profit sector, she was employed for four years by United Way, where she met her husband Miguel, whom she married in 2012.  She earned a master’s degree from Auburn University in business and marketing education and learned about Junior Achievement’s efforts to teach basic economic knowledge and business and financial skills—work which fit closely with what she was already doing for United Way.
 
Jessica gave a brief overview of Junior Achievement’s structure as part of a state-wide organization seeking to prepare today’s K-12 students for success in tomorrow’s global economy.  Its vision is to impart economic skills shaped by core values grounded in market principles and entrepreneurship, a belief in the boundless potential of the young, the power of partnership and collaboration, the value of education, and a passionate commitment to integrity and excellence in all that’s done.
 
Last year JA served 6,000 students in Northwest Georgia, mainly in Gordon, Murray, and Whitfield Counties but also in Bartow, Dade, Gilmer, and Pickens. Its goal for this year is to reach 6,500 students with relevant, authentic experiences that align with school standards, connect with real-world concepts, and infuse business principles into all aspects of learning.
 
In partnership with Dalton State and Dalton High School, JA of Northwest Georgia works to define and demonstrate fundamental concepts of “right” and “wrong” in business, to counter the relativism of “it depends” which often pervades current culture, and to instill a strong sense of personal responsibility for business conduct.  JA’s business ethics program started at North Georgia University, and with the guidance of Professors Larry Johnson and Ben Laughter at Dalton State it has been tailored to fit within the local business environment.  Students visit the Dalton State campus where they spend half a day in “Cartown,” an exercise in which small groups simulate buying and selling used cars, and they attend appropriate classes with DSC faculty and students.
 
Junior Achievement’s work is carried out very largely by volunteers from the business community, and Jessica closed with an invitation to Club members to get involved, even if for no more than one hour per week, by contacting her at jtrivino@georgia.ja.org or at (706) 847-7796.


Jessica Trivino

Announcements and Presentations
 
President Bruce read a letter of thanks from the Family Crisis Center for the Club’s contributions of household and personal goods for the Center’s clients.  Past President Jason Parker announced the Community Justice Forum to advance police and community relations which will be held on October 25 at the Mack Gaston Community Center, sponsored by both of Dalton’s Rotary clubs. 
 
President Bruce gave an update on Rotary International’s effort to eradicate polio.  Last spring there were only three known cases, all in Afghanistan, but now there are 26, of which three are in Nigeria, a country formerly polio-free.  RI has released $8.5 million to resume vaccination programs in these countries, mostly in outlying border regions.  Since 1985 Rotary has spent $1.6 billion to eliminate polio, and the world is now 99.9% polio-free. While our Club typically budgets $10 per member as a monthly contribution to Polio Plus, President Bruce asked members to make extra donations over the next three or four weekly meetings.  He noted that October 24 will be World Polio Day, with a special video to be streamed from the CDC in Atlanta at 6:00 p.m. on that date.  He also stated that auction proceeds on a special piece of china brought from Sweden by our GRSP student, Fredrik Mazur, will go to the polio fund.
 
President Bruce awarded Rob Bradham his Blue Badge, and Fredrik Mazur presented a banner from his home Rotary club in Stockholm-Borgen, pointing out that it bears a symbol dating back to 900 AD.
 

Fredrik Mazur
 
A Rotary Minute with Tommy Willingham
 
Rotarian Tommy Willingham, recently appointed Senior Pastor at Dalton First United Methodist Church, was originally from Rome, Georgia, but moved away as a child when his father shifted from farming to an electrical business in Smyrna, Georgia, and Tommy followed his dad in this line of work until he received a call to the ministry.  He has since served many different types of churches, from small rural gatherings to large downtown congregations, but he found the work of establishing new churches to be specially fulfilling.  Married for 41 years to his high school sweetheart and now with three grown children and ten grandchildren, he and his wife have quickly come to love Dalton, where they hope to stay for many years.  His hobbies include anything outdoors, but particularly hunting, fishing, running, cycling, and golf.
 

Tommy Willingham

 

October 18th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Srivastava, Archana (ARCHANA) 22-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
O'Neill, Lin O'Neill, Michael Paul 19-Oct  
Bowling, Becky Bowling, John 20-Oct  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Winter, Larry E. (LARRY) 10/18/2005 10  
Maret, Michael S. (MIKE) 10/21/2008 7  
Caperton, Robert William Jr.(ROBERT) 10/22/2009 6  
Rhoden, W Scott (SCOTT) 10/23/2007 8  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Mathis, Ginger Minor (GINGER) Thomas (TOM) 20-Oct 9


Transportation Improvements In Whitfield County


By John Hutcheson

Before introducing DeWayne Comer of the Georgia Department of Transportation, Rotarian Steve Farrow paid tribute to Rotarian and former State Senator Roger Williams, whose service on the State Transportation Board has done much to enhance and improve the road networks of Whitfield County and of Northwest Georgia generally.

DeWayne Comer is the District Engineer for the Georgia Department of Transportation’s District 6, which includes Whitfield and other Northwest Georgia counties with an office in Cartersville. A graduate of Southern Polytechnic State University, he has served with the Department of Transportation for twenty-seven years and has been particularly involved in design.


DeWayne Comer

Illustrating his presentation with slides, DeWayne gave an overview of recent Department of Transportation projects in the local district and especially in Whitfield County. Near Atlanta the southbound Metro Express lanes of I-75 are now open, and work is continuing on the Northwest Corridor, which will be a toll road with nearly thirty miles of reversible lanes, including the longest land bridge in Georgia. This work was made possible by the Transportation Funding Act of 2015, which increased the Department’s budgeted resources by three billion dollars.

In Whitfield and surrounding counties, many resurfacing projects are underway, such as that on I-75 from Whitfield County to the Tennessee line. The Rocky Face interchange reconstruction is virtually complete and rebuilding of the Carbondale interchange is in progress. Last year saw work totaling $82 million in Whitfield County.

Immediate goals for the Department include prioritizing the capital maintenance schedule, addressing the needs of many deteriorating facilities, and contracting out much specialty work such as mowing. For 2017-2018, work in District 6 will involve widespread repair of cracked concrete and potholes, edge rut repair and vegetation removal, lane striping, and guardrail protection. The amount of $12.1 million has been set aside for Invited Transportation Bids (ITB’s); these are useful for small projects that can be completed within six months and have been made much easier with the 2015 funding act in place.

Announcements


President Bruce asked for a moment of silence in memory of former Dalton Fire Chief and Rotarian Cliff Maney. Afterwards, he called for recognition of the Dalton State Roadrunners as they enter the basketball tournament for the NAIA championship. Rotarian Ricky Robertson and Past President Jason Parker reminded members about the McClurg Track Meet on March 11 and the Earl Lusk Golf Tournament on April 11 respectively. President Bruce noted that the registration fee for the Rotary International convention in Atlanta in June will increase on March 31, and Past President John Richmond said he had brochures available about the Million Dollar Dinner. Rotarian Rob Bradham asked members to attend this evening’s public meeting when the results of the first two phases of the Chamber of Commerce’s Strategic Plan for Dalton will be announced.



March 14th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Richmond, John D. (JOHN) 20-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Temples, Noel Temples, Coy H 16-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Conway, Deborah R (DEBORAH) 3/15/2016 1  
Tatum, Laurice A. (LAURICE) 3/15/2016 1  
Farrow, Stephen B (STEVE) 3/15/2016 1  
Townsend, Patrick J. (PAT) 3/15/2016 1  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Pratt, Vallarie D. (VALLARIE) Shaun 19-Mar 23


The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act:  Six Years Later


By John Hutcheson
 
Rotarian Don Adcock introduced Mark Mixer, CEO of HealthOne Alliance and Allied Health Plans.  A past president of three HMO’s and president of the largest PPO in Georgia, Mark has just moved to Dalton from Marietta.
 
Mark pointed out that the most controversial part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or PPACA, has been its section concerning health insurance.  Intended to insure the uninsured, it achieved this to a significant degree but it has also displaced many who were formerly insured.  By establishing ten essential health benefits for which everyone is required to pay, whether they need them or not, the measure goes well beyond what most people want from their health insurance—the sort of situation Henry Ford probably had in mind when he said, “If I had asked people about what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses.’”  What they got from Ford was far more than faster horses, bringing benefits but also unintended consequences and unforeseen problems.  The same can be said of the PPACA.
 
Using slides to give a rapid but comprehensive overview of the Act’s insurance provisions, Mark summarized the four “metal level” Exchange Plans:  Platinum, with a 90% to 10% ratio of benefits to co-payments; Gold, with an 80%-20% ratio; Silver, with a 70%-30% ratio; and Bronze, with a 60%-40% ratio.  The PPACA does not require uninsured people to buy insurance, nor does it require employers to offer insurance, but it does impose respective penalties if insurance is not carried or offered, and these penalties are increasing.
 
In Georgia last year there were 1.8 million uninsured non-elderly residents, but ultimately only 8% of these, or about 147,000 persons, were enrolled under the Act.  Because of financial losses, Aetna and Cigna have withdrawn from operations in Georgia as designated by the Act, leaving only Alliant and Blue Cross/Blue Shield as eligible providers in the state.
 
Nationally the Congressional Budget Office projects that in 2023 only 8% of the uninsured will be enrolled under PPACA.  The measure has slowed but has not halted the growth of premiums, and maximum out-of-pocket (MOOP) costs will also increase—perhaps doubling every sixteen years.  Because Federal rules have capped MOOP amounts, there will be strong pressure toward the use of high-deductible plans.  These are likely to be accompanied by tiered networks of providers, domestic medical tourism and bundled payments as patients shop for services, and systemic changes such as greater transparency and tele-health modes of diagnosis and treatment.
 

Mark Mixer

A Rotary Minute with Chris Cooke
 
Officer Chris Cooke of the Dalton Police Department, who was inducted into the Club this past July, introduced himself as a military kid who lived in many places but graduated from high school here.  He served in the Army for four years, of which three-and-a-half were spent in Hawaii.  Now married for 25 years and with two grown sons, he has been with the Dalton Police Department for 26 years and was sponsored for Rotary by his Chief, Club Past President Jason Parker.  Since his induction he has worked with Smitty Barnett to collect goods for the Family Crisis Center, on whose board he served for many years.  His hobbies include building home-made campers, reading literature on leadership, working with Young Leaders of Dalton, and picking on firemen.


Chris Cooke

Announcements
 
Rotarian Rob Bradham urged Club members to take the Greater Dalton Strategy Survey. Secretary-Treasurer Frank Hogshead announced that the badge box is being reorganized to incorporate recently inducted members into an alphabetical sequence and that most badge numbers are likely to change.  Smitty Barnett thanked members for their contributions of personal and household goods during August and September for the benefit of the Family Crisis Center which totaled almost $1,400 in value, and noted that during October canned food will be collected for distribution at Thanksgiving by the Salvation Army.  President Bruce awarded her Blue Badge to Jessica Trivino.  He also reminded the Club that the next Rotary R & R will be on October 18, when a cookout will take the place of the regular weekly meeting. 


Jessica Trivino

 

October 11th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 10/11/16 to 10/17/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Alderman, Paul Wayne Jr. (PAUL) 11-Oct    
Temples, Coy H (COY) 11-Oct    
Waugh, Derek (DEREK) 13-Oct    
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) 16-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sponcler, Betty Sponcler, Maurice M. Jr. 11-Oct  
Ryman, Mary Ryman, Milton J. Jr. 17-Oct  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Cruse, Lesley Dale (DALE) 10/12/2010 5  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Wright, William B. Jr.(WILLIAM) Betty 14-Oct 57


Rotary Track Meet Pictures




 

The Whitfield-Murray Historical Society


By John Hutcheson

President Bruce introduced Rotarian Vallarie Pratt, Executive Director of the Whitfield-Murray Historical Society (WMHS). After earning her bachelor’s degree in history at Dalton State and interning at the Bandy Heritage Center under Dr. John Fowler, Vallarie attended graduate school at the University of West Georgia with a concentration in public history, interning at the Atlanta History Center and receiving a research assistantship from the Georgia Humanities Council to assist First Lady Sandra Deal with historical research for a book on the Governor’s Mansion, Following transfer to the University of North Georgia she received an assistantship in world history and focused on early Christianity and gender studies. She currently resides on a farm in Cohutta with her husband and two sons.

Vallarie Pratt

Vallarie recognized several trustees of the WMHS who were present, along with the Society’s current intern from Dalton State. Her interest in history was first kindled by Tim Howard when she was his middle school student in Murray County. After college and an unsatisfying period of employment in financial marketing, she successfully applied to become the WMHS Executive Director, a position she has now held for a year and found to be completely fulfilling.

The origins of the WMHS go back to 1953, when a group of local women organized to preserve and restore the Chief Vann House in Spring Place, which had fallen into a ruinous condition. After more than four years’ work, the owner donated the house to the state, and it is now managed by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources with advice and assistance from the WMHS.

Following the completion of the Vann House project, the 
Society was inactive until it reorganized in 1976 at the time of the National Bicentennial. Because Whitfield had been part of Murray County until 1851, a single agency for both counties was deemed appropriate, and today it owns and maintains five properties in Whitfield and three in Murray. In Whitfield these include the Crown Gardens and Archives (location of the Society’s headquarters) in the former office building of the Crown Cotton Mill (1890s), the Hamilton House (1840), the Blunt House (1848), the Huff House (ca. 1855), and Dug Gap Battle Park (1864); in Murray are the Wright Hotel (1909), the Chatsworth Depot (1905) where a former L & N caboose (1960) is now being restored, and the Spring Place Methodist Church (1875). Vallarie illustrated each of these with slides, accompanied by brief descriptions and historical summaries.

As the Society moves forward from the 40th anniversary of its revitalization, it is striving to engage and involve younger people with its work along with those of more mature years who have traditionally provided much of its core support. In the summer of 2015 it offered its first annual History Camp for children ages 8-12, providing kid-centered tours, with appropriate activities hosted by of each of its properties, which have proven very successful. In addition, preparations are underway for genealogy camps and to train students to act as junior docents at the Society’s sites, with scholarships available to high school students based on their work with the WMHS. Among future plans are bilingual tours and an increasing emphasis on Living History exhibits.

Coming events include genealogy workshops held in cooperation with the Daughters of the American Revolution, the annual Rummage Sale on March 24th and 25th, a presentation on Mill League baseball to be presented by Dr. Tom Veve of Dalton State, the Huffabaloo at the Huff House on May 7, and “Tea With Mom” at the Wright Hotel on May 13. Most of the Society’s venues may be rented for weddings or receptions, and it has also recently published an illustrated history of the Whitfield County Schools by one of its most active members, Dr. Ellen Thompson. All of these undertakings reflect the WMHS’s community outreach, frequently in partnership with other organizations and acting upon the maxim that “there’s no use in saving it if you don’t share it.” Together they seek to honor the Society’s motto: “Preserving the past. Ensuring the future.”

Announcements

President Bruce introduced Rotarian Rich Panyik, a charter member and former president of the Rotary Club of South Gwinnett and Governor of District 6910 in 1999-2000. Rich briefly recalled the history of The Rotary Foundation, which will celebrate its centennial at the Atlanta Rotary International Convention in June. As the District 6910 Major Donor Chair, he appealed for members to consider attending the Million Dollar Dinner for the Foundation’s benefit to be hosted at at the Georgia Aquarium on June 9 by Districts 6900, 6910, and 6920; eligibility to attend requires a gift of at least $10,000 made or pledged during the centennial year of 2016-2017.


Rich Panyik

President Bruce presented Blue Badges to Rotarians Darla Chambliss and Linda Blackman.


Darla Chambliss and Linda Blackman



Recovering Our Past: Georgia's Rural Churches


By John Hutcheson
 
Program Chairman Henry Tharpe introduced former Rotarian Jim Jolly, who in turn introduced Sonny Seals and George Hart, co-founders of Historic Rural Churches of Georgia (HRCG), a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization dedicated to research, documentation, and preservation of Georgia’s historic rural churches.  Jim met Sonny and George while hunting in Hancock County, where the two, who’ve been friends since 1961 and are tireless road-trippers always on the look-out for old churches, cemeteries, and collapsing buildings, had discovered an early nineteenth-century church with much of its original structure intact but needing extensive restoration.  George later took Sonny to Clinton, formerly the seat of Jones County, where George had grown up.  There they found a Methodist church, built in 1821 and still functioning, although the town itself is now largely gone.  These experiences were the start of Historic Rural Churches of Georgia, founded in 2012, which now works in about half of Georgia’s 159 counties (although not yet in Whitfield or Murray).  Eleven photographers are providing visual documentation, and the organization publishes its findings on a website which has attracted 500,000 hits over the past year.  Its Facebook page has 40,000 followers, and through the University of Georgia Press it has just published a book covering 47 churches, with a foreword by President Jimmy Carter.
 
Rural churches are repositories of the history of Georgia and the South in ways that differ from churches in towns or cities.  Stimulated by the eight land lotteries held between 1805 and 1833, Georgia’s population rapidly expanded to the west and north from the coastal region.  In much of the state, where settlements were widely scattered and governing institutions barely existed, churches provided more social cohesion than anything else and became uniquely influential centers of community life.  Consequently, their stories are often those of their communities as well, making rural churches eyes through which much of Georgia’s past can be viewed.  An example can be seen at Powelton in Hancock County, a town no longer extant but still the location of two important churches.  On one end of town is the Baptist church, organized in 1786 and one of the oldest continuously operating Baptist churches in the state, while on the other is the Methodist church, where Sonny was astonished to discover its cemetery to be the burial place of one of his great-grandfathers, who had served in the Confederate Army.
 
HRCG groups churches into three categories:  thriving, barely hanging on, and gone but not forgotten.  Its physical preservation work is done in cooperation with local community agencies, and with an estimated average of three eligible churches in each of Georgia’s counties, there is much to be done.  In closing, Sonny and George requested Club members to visit HRCG’s website and Facebook page and to feel free to nominate potential candidates for research and preservation.
 

George Hart and Sonny Seals

Announcements
 
President Bruce announced that collection of food and household supplies for the Family Crisis Center during August and September was very successful, and in October the Club will collect food for distribution by the Salvation Army.  He then introduced Bruce Frazier, Public Relations Specialist for the Dalton Police Department, who now manages the Club’s Newsletter and its exposure on social media.  Bruce encouraged members to visit the Club’s Facebook page, and he showed two commercial videos now running on WDNN in which Rotarians Shell Underwood, John Hutcheson, and Ricky and Cherri Robertson briefly describe Rotary’s significance for them and for the local community.


Bruce Frazier

A Rotary Minute with Ricky Robertson
 
Rotarian Ricky Robertson, describing himself as a Christian, a husband, and a father, told of growing up locally, attending Southeast Whitfield High School and Dalton State College and graduating with a bachelor’s degree in management information systems.  His first job after college was with the Whitfield County Sheriff’s Department, in which he rose to the rank of detective, specializing in white-collar crimes.  From this position he was recruited by the banking industry to work in security, and he is now employed by FSG, a part of Atlantic Capital Bank.  His wife, Cherri, is also a Rotarian and they have two children.  They are members of New Life Baptist Church, and in his spare time Ricky enjoys marathon running.


Ricky Robertson

October 4th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Willingham, Tommy G (TOMMY) 4-Oct    
Farmer, Joseph (JOSEPH) 6-Oct    
Tripp, Larry E. (LARRY) 7-Oct    
Gilreath, Judy Ellen (JUDY) 9-Oct    
Aft, David (DAVID) 9-Oct    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Sutherland, Phyllis Sutherland, George W. 5-Oct  
Griffin, Brenda Griffin, Ronald L 8-Oct  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Barnett, George S (SMITTY) 10/6/2015 0  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) Anna 4-Oct 12
Chute, Patricia M (PAT) Bob 9-Oct 34
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) Sherry 10-Oct 28


March 7th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Henson, Paul E. Jr. (PAUL) 10-Mar    
McCoy, Norman D. (NORMAN) 12-Mar    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Griffin, Candy Griffin, Joseph Bryan 12-Mar  
Harris, Lezlie Harris, Kevin W 13-Mar  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Weaver, William B (BILL) Virginia 12-Mar 51


Interact At Christian Heritage School


By John Hutcheson
 
President Bruce announced that an Interact Club has been organized at Christian Heritage School—the second such club in an area high school—and he introduced Kelsey and Meghan Schneller, twin sisters who are its co-presidents; April Schneller, the club’s advisor; and Gerald Porter, the CHS Head of School.  After reading the Interact Mission Statement, President Bruce presented an official certification to the co-presidents.
 

President Bruce and the Interact officers
 
He then turned the program over to Mr. Porter, who gave a brief overview of CHS.  Preparing to celebrate its 30th anniversary this year, the school now has about 400 students enrolled in its K-12 grades, and when the new high school facility, scheduled for completion this coming November, opens in August 2017, space will be available to grow to 600 students.  One critical aspect of CHS is its emphasis on service through real-world projects which are STEM-based with a fine arts component added; another is the importance attached to global outreach, exemplified by a program in Swaziland to combine Christian missionary work with the development of sustainable energy and increased food production.  Moreover, CHS now enrolls twenty foreign students, and its board has mandated greater diversity in the student body.
 
Mr. Porter then called on Albert Laboy, Latino Outreach and International Director for CHS, who in turn introduced Chad Zhang, a junior from China, and Veljko Stojanovic, a senior from Serbia, asking them to comment briefly on their experiences in America and at CHS.  Chad said he had been amazed by the diversity he’s encountered and the friendships he’s formed, while Veljko praised CHS for fostering creativity in its students—of the many schools he’s attended, he sees CHS as the best.  Its teachers are rigorous, but they know when to show grace.  Within the U.S. he is happiest in the South because of its warm hospitality.
 
CHS students Kersten Shultz, Heath Hardaway, and Darrin Pasquah presented a video about “Winds of Hope,” the project in Swaziland.  Over five days CHS students built two vertical wind turbines to generate sustainable energy which can be used to support work in aquaponics that will enrich the food supply, while at the same time they energetically spread the Christian message.  Through this and a current project to provide hybrid energy to a Christian school for the deaf in Jamaica, the students hope to become servant models for those who succeed them at CHS.
 
Interact advisor Schneller closed the program by pointing to local CHS service work, such as assisting at Friendship House, and she invited Rotarians to visit CHS for a closer look at its undertakings.
 

Guests from CHS

A Rotary Minute with Shell Underwood
 
Shell Underwood, who was inducted into Rotary a few weeks ago on August 2, introduced herself as the mother of three children ages 4, 8, and 9, along with two adult children from her husband’s previous marriage. He works much of the time on an oil platform in the South China Sea and Shell owns a local insurance practice with Modern Woodmen of America.  She began attending Rotary during her recent campaign for a County Commission seat, in the course of which she learned about Rotary’s service ethic, was deeply impressed by it, and wanted to participate in Rotary’s good work.
 

Shell Underwood

An Announcement and Inductions of New Members
 
President Bruce informed the Club that it has received a District Grant of $2,100 for use in a Centennial Service Project to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Rotary Foundation.  Membership Chair Tray Brantley introduced Celeste Creswell, Valerie Brantley, Sandy McKenzie, and Pat Chute for induction into the Club by President Bruce, who also presented Rotarian Chris Cooke with his Blue Badge.

Telling Dalton's Stories For Education and Heritage Tourism Dollars


By John Hutcheson

Rotarian Bill Blackman introduced Rotarian Kathryn Sellers and Brett Huske, Director of Tourism for the Dalton Visitors Bureau. Kathryn knows well the value the history and its treasures that lie in our own backyard, and she has long promoted tourism and historical preservation, most recently through the Civil War 150th Committee and the Textile Heritage Trail. A member of the Historical Preservation Commissions both for Dalton and for Whitfield County, she has been instrumental in preserving the Huff House on Selvidge Street and in restoration and adaptation of the Martin House as part of First Presbyterian Church.


Kathryn Sellers

Kathryn began her presentation by pointing out that in addition to the economic benefits Dalton derives from hosting various recreational events and sporting competitions—especially those drawn by its proximity to the mountains—the community is also ideally situated to show visitors its rich cultural and historical context. Cultural heritage tourists seek to experience places, artifacts, and activities that authentically represent the stories and people of an area’s past and present through its cultural, historic, and natural resources, and research shows that such visitors stay longer and spend more money than those arriving for a specific event.

In Dalton/Whitfield, tourism supports 1,604 jobs and generates $172.2 million in travel spending, which in turn produces $5.2 million in local tax revenue, with another $1,641,119 accruing in 2016 from the lodging tax. For conservation, interpretation, exhibition, and marketing, local heritage tourism is supported by the cooperative efforts of the Dalton Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Whitfield-Murray Historical Society, the Bandy Heritage Center at Dalton State College, Save the Dalton Battlefields LLC, the Dalton and Whitfield County Historic Preservation Commissions, and the governments of Dalton and Whitfield County.

Using slides, Kathryn illustrated and gave historical highlights for several locations, including the Crown Gardens & Archives, the Blunt House, Dug Gap Battle Park, the Huff House, the Bandy Heritage Center’s exhibition space in the Old Freight Depot, and the Crescent City Rail Car. She briefly reviewed the work of the Civil War 150th commemoration, noting that the 150 articles on local Civil War history which appeared in the Daily Citizen from 2010 to 2015 will soon be published in book form. The National Park Service has stated that Dalton has “the most still-intact Civil War defenses of any city in the United States,” and Kathryn’s slides showed views of earthen and stone works to be found at Potato Hill off Reed Road, on Blue Mountain, overlooking Mill Creek Gap, and on Rocky Face Ridge. Prater’s Mill and the Tunnel Hill Heritage Center are additional attractions for heritage tourists.

Moving beyond the Civil War era to Dalton’s industrial development as a manufacturing center, attention has begun to focus on the chenille and carpet story. An information kiosk at the Cuyler Street corner of the Freight Depot directs visitors to a number of historical tufting industry sites, and an exhibition designer has been contracted to create an exhibit in the Convention Center which will gather and present artifacts integral to the chenille-to-carpet story—Kathryn appealed to Club members for help in collecting old machinery, carpet raw materials, and examples of end products. Finally, she reminded members of the upcoming Dixie Highway Celebration on April 21-22 which will celebrate the centennial of the Dixie Highway (today’s US 41) and its importance as a supplement to the railroad for connecting Dalton to the outside world.

Announcements

Rotarian Ricky Robertson reminded the Club about the track meet on March 11 as did Past President Jason Parker regarding the golf tournament on April 11; both asked for additional assistance from members. President Bruce read articles from the March issue of The Rotarian regarding the importance of growing membership, and he presented her blue badge to Rotarian Sandy McKenzie.


Sandy McKenzie

 


September 25th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 09/27/16 to 10/03/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Wright, Thomas L (THOMAS) 2-Oct    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Trivino, Miguel Trivino, Jessica K. 27-Sep  
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total
Sellers, Kathryn Oehler (KATHRYN) 9/27/2011 4 4
Kiker, Janice F. (JANICE) 9/30/2014 1 1
Jones, Miller T. (MILLER) 9/30/2014 1 1
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) 10/1/2013 2 2
Griffin, Joseph Bryan (BRYAN) 10/1/2013 2 2
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Chambliss, Darla P (DARLA) Alex 28-Sep 24
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) Joanie 30-Sep 20


Georgia Northwestern Technical College: The Dalton/


By John Hutcheson
 
Since the Dalton Country Club was closed for its annual post-Labor Day maintenance, the Rotary Club of Dalton accepted an invitation to meet  on the Whitfield-Murray campus of Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC), with lunch catered by the Oakwood Cafe.  President Bruce introduced Rotarian Dr. Ginger Mathis, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs for GNTC’s Whitfield-Murray, Catoosa, and Walker County campuses and Manager of the Whitfield-Murray facility.  She in turn introduced Dr. Pete McDonald, President of GNTC since 2013 and a member of the Rotary Club of Rome.
 

Dr. Ginger Mathis and Dr. Pete McDonald
 
After recognizing several other GNTC administrators in the room, President McDonald briefly surveyed the Technical College System of Georgia, within which GNTC is one of 22 such institutions.  On its six campuses serving nine counties GNTC pursues a three-fold mission of providing technical education, fostering economic development, and offering adult education opportunities.  A video showed how GNTC works to meet the needs of business and industry in the core areas of business and industrial technology, health professions, and public service, guided by the advice of a Board of Directors composed of fourteen diverse business, industrial, and professional leaders.
 
During the last academic year GNTC enrolled 7,970 students, of which 32.5% were full-time, 67.5% were part-time, 63% were female and 37% were male.  There were about 3,000 adult education students, and the College overall provided more than 45,000 credit hours of customized training.  In addition, it awarded 276 GED’s and provided driver’s education to more than 90 students.  The newest campus is a 55,000 sq. ft. facility in Ringgold, opened in the fall of 2016.
 
The Whitfield-Murray campus has strong partnerships with the Whitfield County Schools, Dalton State College, and the Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy.  It is now in Phase 2 of an expansion plan which calls for a badly needed 80,000 sq. ft. building that will house advanced skill laboratories and eliminate having to share these with the Career Academy.  The state’s FY 2015 budget appropriated $900,000 for planning, and with a projected cost of $22.9 million, the structure will be built adjacent to the existing facilities, on a site of 23 acres transferred to GNTC by the Whitfield County Schools.    Thanks to local assistance marshaled by President Joe Yarbrough of the Carpet and Rug Institute, the site has been graded and prepared, and further donations from private sources may encourage the Governor to approve final funding.
 
Future programs needed on the Whitfield-Murray campus lie in the fields of industrial technology, industrial operations, and partnerships with flooring manufacturers.  Along with the necessity for physical expansion, challenges facing the campus include retaining experienced faculty, responding to area workforce needs, increasing the number of GED completers, and adjusting to a growing number of dual-enrollment high school students under the state’s Move On When Ready program.
 
Following the presentation and adjournment of the meeting, Whitfield-Murray campus staff provided lab tours for interested Club members.
 

Lab Tour
 

September 13th and 20th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 09/11/16 to 09/26/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Boyett, William T (BILLY) 16-Sep    
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) 17-Sep    
Cooke, Christopher M (CHRIS) 24-Sep    
Dickson, Thomas S. (TOM) 22-Sep    
Minor, John Thomas V (JOHN) 15-Sep    
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) 12-Sep    
Pennington, David E. (DAVID) 22-Sep    
Williams, Roger (ROGER) 22-Sep    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Parker, April Parker, Hoyt Jason 24-Sep  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total
Boyett, William T (BILLY) 9/24/2013 3 3
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) 9/20/2011 5 5
Scott, William M. (WILL) 9/23/2014 2 2
Tripp, Larry E. (LARRY) 9/23/2014 2 2
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Bowen, William C. III(BILL) Ann 14-Sep 42
Kiker, Janice F. (JANICE) John 23-Sep 55
Little, William Norris Sr.(NORRIS) Billie 13-Sep 63
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) Julie 12-Sep 45
Ward, Barbara K. (BARBARA) Allen 17-Sep 49


Meet Our New GRSP Student


By John Hutcheson
 
Past President John Richmond reported on attending the GRSP conclave at Augusta State University on August 26, where 51 students in this year’s GRSP gathered for a kick-off event.  Representing 17 countries, they are enrolled at 22 different colleges across the state.
 
Rotarian Larry Winter, whose family are the current local GRSP hosts, thanked John Richmond and Bill Bowen for their dedication to GRSP and introduced the Club’s sponsored student for this year, Fredrik Mazur of Sweden.  Fredrik also thanked John and Bill for their help in getting him settled in Dalton and extended gratitude to the Club for making his stay here possible.
 

Fredrik Mazur
 
In Sweden Fredrik is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Stockholm-Borgen, where his grandfather has been a member for more than 50 years.  With a current membership of about 40, this is one of several Rotary clubs in the Stockholm area.
 
Using slides, Fredrik gave a brief overview of Sweden and its culture.  Having a population of 9.9 million and an area about three times that of Georgia, the country is a parliamentary democracy with an hereditary monarch—currently Carl XVI Gustaf—as the symbolic head of state and royal palaces at Drottningholm and Stockholm.  Swedish celebrities include, among many, the actress Greta Garbo; the pop singing group ABBA; Astrid Lindgren, creator of Pippa Longstocking; tennis champion Bjorn Borg; and Alicia Vikander, who won this year’s Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.  Volvo and Ikea are internationally known Swedish companies, as are Spotify, Skype, Minecraft, Ericsson (software), and H & M (high-end clothing).  Among notable Swedish inventors are Alfred Nobel (dynamite), Rune Elmqvist (the implantable pacemaker), Johan Petter Johansson (the adjustable wrench), and Gideon Sündback (the zipper).
 
Fredrik grew up in Falkenberg, a village on the west coast of Sweden, but his family moved to Stockholm three years ago.  As a child he wanted to become a policeman.  Over the years he spent much time playing soccer and table tennis (a very popular game in Sweden) and skiing, but he also worked hard in school where he began studying English at age ten.  His favorite game now is golf, which he plays often with his best friend, whom he met in high school. 
 
Fredrik’s parents met when they were students at the Stockholm School of Economics.  His father has been Vice President for Sales with Carlsberg Beer and Campbell Nordic and now has his own company which handles nationwide advertising of grocery specials.  His mother began her career as an accountant and then taught high school.  His older brother is 26 and is in a doctoral program in physics, and his sister, who is 24, holds a degree from the Stockholm School of Economics and is a management consultant.  To broaden their experiences, Fredrik’s family takes a major trip each year, in the past visiting places such as Switzerland, Italy, and the United States, where they went to New York and Florida.
 
Responding to questions, Fredrik said that the major Swedish holidays are Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer Day.  He heard about GRSP through his sister, who has studied in Illinois.  At Dalton State he is taking U. S. history and government, business environment, and English composition—he dropped calculus, having already taken it in high school.  When he returns to Sweden, he may go into business engineering, although this isn’t yet a certainty.  In the meantime, he hopes his new friends in Dalton Rotary will feel free to contact him at 706-581-7410, by email at Fredrik.mazur@me.com, or on Facebook at FredrikMazur.

Family Crisis Center Project
 
President Bruce reminded members of the Club’s project to collect personal care items for the Family Crisis Center, such as soaps, deodorants, razors, toothpaste, laundry soap, towels, washcloths, twin-size sheets and comforters, hairbrushes, feminine products, and used cell phones that can be converted to 911 access.  Collection boxes will be at the reception desk at the meetings on September 20 and 27.


Family Crisis Center Donation Boxes

A Rotary Minute with Vallarie Pratt
 
Vallarie Pratt, who was inducted into Rotary a few weeks ago on July 19, introduced herself in this year’s first Rotary Minute.  Now Director of the Whitfield-Murray Historical Society, her interest in history led her to graduate school and a research assistantship at the Governor’s Mansion in Atlanta.  She has been married to her husband Shaun for 23 years and is the mother of two sons.  They live on a horse farm in Cohutta, where she also raises free-range chickens as a hobby.  


Vallarie Pratt

September 6th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 09/06/16 to 09/12/16    
   
Member Birthdays Birthday      
Myers, Jeffrey Donald (JEFFREY) 7-Sep      
Miller, Charles Dalton (CHARLES) 7-Sep      
Peterfreund, Allen David (ALLEN) 8-Sep      
Taylor, Zachary (ZACH) 8-Sep      
Elliott, Judy M. (JUDY) 9-Sep      
Johnson, Roy Glenn (ROY) 10-Sep      
Mooney, Patricia H (PATTY) 12-Sep      
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday    
Pennington, Pamela Pennington, David E. 6-Sep    
Pare', Pamela Pare', Michel C. 8-Sep    
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total  
No member anniversaries this period.    
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years  
Townsend, Patrick J (PAT) Teresa 10-Sep 38  
Tharpe, Henry C. (HENRY) Julie 12-Sep 44  


The Unseen Hazard To Your Health


By John Hutcheson


Don Finkell
 
Rotarian Janice Kiker introduced Zachary Taylor, M.D., a Rotarian and Director of the North Georgia Health District, and Don Finkell, formerly a staff architect with TVA who subsequently spent more than thirty years in the hardwood flooring industry at Anderson Hardwood Floors, where he became CEO, and at Shaw Industries following its acquisition of Anderson in 2007.  After retiring from Shaw in 2013 Don founded American OEM, a U.S. producer of engineered hardwood floors which offers a competitive alternative to imported private label products.  Janice proudly noted that Don also happens to be her son-in-law.

Dr. Taylor began the program with general remarks on hazards associated with formaldehyde, one of the most common chemicals in our everyday environment.  Popularly known for its preservative qualities and pungent odor, formaldehyde is almost universally present in small amounts, even being produced in minute quantities by the human body.  Breaking down in air and easily dissolved in water, it does not build up in humans, but extended exposure to large amounts can cause disorders ranging from respiratory system irritations to several kinds of cancer.  Fortunately, such dangers can be readily avoided or minimized.  By way of presenting a special case, Don Finkell surveyed formaldehyde’s use in the manufacture of hardwood floor coverings, along with some of the challenges arising from its regulation in domestic production, particularly in the light of competition with products imported from countries with less stringent standards or maybe none at all.  

Don noted that floor coverings can strongly affect indoor air quality, and manufacturers thus have a responsibility to their customers to reduce hazards as much as possible.  Formaldehyde is an important component in the glues used in plywood and in laminate and engineered floors, and its regulation may be applied either to separate stages of the manufacturing process or to the finished products—the approach will vary from place to place in the U.S.  Moreover, laminated wood floors and engineered floors each have their own sets of regulations because of different amounts of glue used in them.  Since 2008 the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has imposed notably rigorous regulations, based on certifications by independent third parties, and these have been mimicked by the Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of the Federal government.
 
Although domestic producers of hardwood flooring are subject to extensive regulation, foreign producers are not, and by using cheaper glues foreign products gain a competitive advantage in the retail market.  However, their higher formaldehyde emissions do not meet standards such as those used by CARB, and consequently their distributors have sometimes fallen into grave legal jeopardy.   An example is Lumber Liquidators, a business which sold much flooring produced in China and was prosecuted following an exposé by CBS on 60 Minutes of the dangerous formaldehyde levels in Chinese flooring products. 

Once a billion-dollar company, Lumber Liquidators is now in danger of failure.  Further difficulties have emerged from a modification of the Lacey Act, a U.S. law passed in 1900 to restrict imports of stolen animal products.  In 2008 it was amended to include certain trees and wood products, with the intent of preventing illegal logging and deforestation.  This created more problems for Lumber Liquidators, for the amendment’s environmental implications engaged the interest of animal rights activists who have now become leading watchers for compliance with the measure.
 

August 30th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 08/30/16 to 09/05/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Cope, Don (DON) 1-Sep    
Satterfield, Bruce A. (BRUCE) 5-Sep    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Hutcheson, Marilyn Hutcheson, John A. Jr. 2-Sep  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total
Goodroe, Robert S. (ROBERT) 9/1/1964 51 51
Sanders, Drayton M II(DRAYTON) 9/1/1979 36 36
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Howard, Gary L. (GARY) Janie 5-Sep 45


A Visit From The District Governor


By John Hutcheson


District Governor Kim Waters
 
Assistant District Governor Mary Thelma Norris, a member of Dalton’s Carpet City Rotary Club, introduced District 6910 Governor Kim Waters.  A native of Gainesville, Georgia, Governor Kim served as President of the Rotary Club of Hall County in 2010-2011 and was Rotarian of the Year for 2011-2012.  She can boast a perfect attendance record, holding many offices at district and state levels, and is a Level III Major Donor and member of the Paul Harris Society.  A real estate and insurance professional, she is also an aviation enthusiast and a licensed pilot for land and sea flying.
 
Her distinguished record in Rotary notwithstanding, Governor Kim began her comments with a reminder that every Rotarian is important, regardless of office or status.  As the centennial of the Rotary Foundation, the year 2017 is especially significant, for the Foundation and its work are what make Rotary different from other civic associations, and the Governor is encouraging all clubs to initiate or designate a Centennial Project.  An example for our club would be its provision of benches in Brookwood Park, which was partly funded by a district grant of $2,100 from the Foundation.  On a broader scale, she cited projects underwritten by the district governors in RI Zones 33 and 34 (of which District 6910 is a part) to contribute a cataract surgery machine to a Jamaican hospital and—inspired by RI President John Germ of Chattanooga—to build a peace garden at a home for abused girls. With a current endowment of more than $100 billion, the Foundation has funded over $3 billion in various projects since its establishment in 1917, of which the near-eradication of polio is one of the most recent and meaningful.  Until last week only 19 known cases remained—13 in Pakistan and 6 in Afghanistan—and while two more have just been discovered in Nigeria, it’s fair to say that the end of polio is in sight.  Over its 79-year history, the Rotary Club of Dalton has contributed almost $425,000 to the Rotary Foundation.
 
Turning to this year’s goals for both RI and for District 6910, Governor Kim pointed to membership growth as the highest priority.  Like RI generally, the Dalton club’s membership has remained essentially stable for at least twenty years.  She suggested that the obligations of membership may need to become more flexible, with less emphasis on maintaining perfect or near-perfect attendance and more on how Rotarians can become better parts of their community and, in the process, better persons themselves.  As RI President John has said, Rotary needs willing hands, caring hearts, and bright minds, and this year’s “Strengthening Rotary” initiative focuses on extending the Rotary brand by “connecting leaders to exchange ideas and take action,” whether locally or internationally.  The Foundation is the arm that enables such action, and learning about its vision and accomplishments from current Rotarians can be a powerful attractor to potential new members, many of whom are likely to join Rotary if only they are asked.
 
Governor Kim concluded by thanking the club for all it does and presented President Bruce a specially minted 2017 coin commemorating the Foundation’s centennial while urging members to attend the District conference in Chattanooga in October and the RI annual convention in Atlanta next June.  She encouraged the Club’s continuation toward achieving a membership totally composed of Paul Harris Fellows, and she asked everyone to consider making a special centennial donation to the Foundation which would be applied to the district goal of $100,000.  At the end of her remarks, club treasurer Frank Hogshead announced a $500 donation to the Foundation in Governor Kim’s honor. 

Announcements and Recognitions
 
Past President John Richmond introduced Fredrik Mazur of Stockholm, Sweden, who is the Club’s sponsored GRSP student for the coming academic year.  Fredrik will speak to the Club at its meeting on August 30.

Responding to RI President John Germ's message of “Rotary Serving Humanity,” Smitty Barnett, Community Service Chair, announced that the Brookwood Park improvement project is now almost complete, and he outlined a new program to provide assistance to local agencies on a year-round basis. The first such project is to collect needed items for the Family Crisis Center such as soaps, deodorants, razors, toothpaste, laundry soap, towels, washcloths, twin sheets and comforters, hairbrushes, feminine products, and used cell phones that can be converted for 911 access.  Beginning at the August 23 meeting and continuing through September, these can be deposited in a box near the check-in desk.  In October, a canned food drive will be conducted in cooperation with the Salvation Army, and throughout the year Rotarians will partner as needed with members of First United Methodist Church and the American Legion to build wheelchair ramps and decks for disabled veterans.


Smitty Barnett

District 6910 Governor Kim Waters presented recently inducted Rotarian Will Scott with his blue badge.  She also recognized Immediate Past President Jason Parker as a new Paul Harris Fellow, facilitated by an anonymous donation in honor of Jason’s service to Rotary.


Will Scott (left) and Jason Parker (right)

August 23rd Birthdays and Anniversaries


Birthdays and Anniversaries for 08/23/16 to 08/29/16  
 
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Rhoden, W Scott (SCOTT) 23-Aug    
Rowland, Bradley Wayne (BRAD) 25-Aug    
Sanford, Robert Mitchell (MITCH) 25-Aug    
Jones, J Sherwood III (SHERWOOD) 26-Aug    
Farrow, Stephen B (STEVE) 26-Aug    
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) 27-Aug    
Morehouse, Gordon C. (GORDON) 27-Aug    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Aft, Pauline Aft, David 27-Aug  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Pare', Michel C. (MICHEL) Pamela 23-Aug 29
Broadrick, Bruce L. (BRUCE) Mary Ann 23-Aug 40
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) Carolyn 26-Aug 49
Bowling, John (JOHN) Becky 27-Aug 49


2016 High School Football Preview


By John Hutcheson
 

President Bruce Satterfield and President-Elect Kevin Brunson

Dalton Kiwanis president John Thomas opened a joint meeting of the Rotary Club of Dalton and the Carpet City Rotary Club with the Dalton Kiwanis Club at the Dalton Convention Center.  After welcoming remarks he introduced Rotarian and former Dalton High School Football Coach Ronnie McClurg, who emphasized that high school football in the Dalton/Whitfield area is blessed to have extremely talented and committed individuals in the coaching positions and called on five local coaches to give their assessments of the coming season,
 
Coach Jay Poag of Christian Heritage High School began by recognizing his school’s Athletic Director, Chad Jordan, and pointed to a high level of excitement at Christian Heritage following an active summer for his team.  CHHS players visited Atlanta for the Cam Newton 7-on-7 tournament and traveled to Charlotte as well.  This year will see a lot of new faces on offense, but with players at 6’5”, 6’7”, and 6’4” there is strong potential for good passing and receiving.  One team member is Coach Poag’s son, and another is an exchange student from Spain who originally planned to play basketball but changed to football and shows much promise even though he’d never played the game before.  On defense, five or six players are returning, and there are good prospects in the middle school for future squads.  The team will go back to Charlotte for scrimmages and college tours and open its regular season with North Murray High on August 19.
 
Coach Chad Barger of Coahulla Creek High School said that “the Creek is on the rise” as it builds a tradition.  While his squad of 53 (down from 75 in spring practice) lacks size and experience, they have good skills and will need to be creative.  Coach Barger and his staff are stressing the importance of committing to the team’s effort rather than merely contributing to it (analogous to how a chicken’s provision of eggs to the breakfast table is a contribution, but the pig’s provision of bacon represents commitment).  During the summer the CCHS team went to 7-on-7 and 11-on-11 camps, where they learned to “show up, play, and press hard.”
 
Coach Matt Land of Dalton High School noted that DHS, as in the last six years, finds itself in a new region with a new classification, facing a new set of opponents, including South Cobb High of Austell, Harrison High of Kennesaw, Osborne High of Marietta, and—at the season’s end—Allatoona High of Acworth, last year’s 5-A state champions.  Competition of this caliber means a year of getting up early and staying late, made even more challenging by new Georgia High School Association rules about the number of practices, heat exposure, and physical contact that limit preparation and conditioning time.  This year Dalton will replace twelve starters, but the quarterback is returning.  The offensive line will have three seniors, two of whom are starters.  With appropriate modifications, defensive strategy will be the same used since 1998.  The specialty teams are good, with an excellent kicker, and for the fourth year every senior (of whom there are 27) will start or be part of a specialty team.
 
Coach Josh Robinson of Northwest Whitfield High School introduced several of his players and looked back on a productive summer.  Although 7-on-7 is not “real” football, it does give good competitive experience, and Northwest’s players ended up second in their pool.  This year they are making three replacements on the offensive line, but the new starters are adjusting well.  On defense eight starters must be replaced, but here again there is much potential for success.  With a new field, new jerseys and helmets, and other new equipment, Northwest is looking forward to being in the playoffs.
 
As in the past, Coach Sean Gray of Southeast Whitfield High School expressed gratitude to a very generous donor for enabling his school to have facilities second to none and support for players otherwise unable to afford to play.  Although his team has about ninety players, there isn’t a great deal of depth, so there will be a lot of doubling.  Coach Gray is excited about his defense—last year’s was the best in 23 years.  His players are tough, and while the secondary needs work, it has skilled members.  On offense there are a lot of new men but some good tall receivers.  This year’s seniors were once Southeast’s best freshman class, and they should become the school’s winningest seniors in 31 years.
 
Responding to a question about who had the largest lineman, the coaches conferred and decided on a Christian Heritage player who stands 6’6” and weighs 330 pounds.

August 16th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday    
Turner, Henry J (CHIP) 16-Aug    
Robertson, Ricky N (RICKY) 16-Aug    
Ryman, Milton J. Jr. (MILTON) 16-Aug    
Tatum, Laurice A (LAURICE) 18-Aug    
Blackman, Bill M (BILL) 18-Aug    
Hawkins, Jim R. (JIM) 18-Aug    
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) 19-Aug    
Jones, Miller T. (MILLER) 19-Aug    
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Robertson, Ricky Robertson, Cherri L 16-Aug  
Blackman, Bill Blackman, Linda T. 18-Aug  
Turner, Carolyn Turner, Henry J 20-Aug  
Dobbins, Donna Dobbins, Chuck 20-Aug  
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years  
Chambliss, Darla P (DARLA) 8/18/2015 1  
Minter, B. Scott (SCOTT) 8/18/2015 1  
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Sanders, Drayton M II(DRAYTON) Mary Etta 16-Aug 57
Laughter, R Lynette (LYNN) Ben 19-Aug 43


NGTC: New Doors To The Workforce


By John Hutcheson
 

Ginger Mathis
 
Rotarian Ginger Mathis, Associate Vice President of Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC), introduced David Moeller, CEO of the Northwest Georgia College and Career Academy, and Randall Griffus, Dean of the School of Science, Technology, and Mathematics at Dalton State College.  Ginger, David, and Randall described how their respective institutions are cooperating to increase the supply of skilled workers for local employers and to enable smooth progression by students from high school through the bachelor’s degree in certain specialized programs.
 
Over the past five years enrollment on the Whitfield/Murray campus of GNTC has grown from 423 in 2012 to 1,266 in 2016, and it has increased by a further 200 for the coming academic year.  The greatest growth has been in high school enrollments, which rose from 90 in 2012 to 560 in 2016.  GNTC is now well ahead of all other state institutions in the number of invoiced credits in the Move On When Ready program, which allows high school juniors or seniors to receive high school and college credit simultaneously while attending college classes on a college campus.  At the Whitfield/Murray facility, the largest number of high school enrollees in 2016 came from Murray High School, which sent 226, followed by North Murray High School with 124.
 
Since the Dalton-Whitfield economy is based on manufacturing, GNTC strongly emphasizes manufacturing skills.  Nationally, more than 75% of manufacturers report moderate to severe shortages of skilled workers, and this condition is reflected locally.  At the Career Academy, a new manufacturing committee is focusing on aligning programs in mechatronics, electronics, manufacturing, welding, chemical technology, and engineering and technology with post-secondary education, using dual enrollments, college credits for high school courses, and seamless transitions to college and further education.  In coordination with the School of Science, Technology, and Mathematics at Dalton State, GNTC will participate in laddered programs leading from the Certificate to the Associate and Bachelor of Applied Science degrees in Chemistry and in Information Technology, along with another in Technology Management to be offered through Dalton State’s School of Business.  Future program opportunities are being explored in Manufacturing Technology, Logistics and Supply Chain, Health Care, and Education.
 
Such growth in program offerings and enrollments necessitates physical expansion on the Whitfield/Murray campus.  Currently GNTC uses about 35,000 square feet of the Career Academy’s facilities, often piggy-backing similar programs in appropriate spaces.  Legislative approval has been received to study the need for additional space and to plan for a new building of 80,000 square feet, projected to house existing programs in diesel mechanics and machine tools along with several new ones.

GRSP Update

Rotarian John Richmond reported on his recent visit to Sweden, where he met the GRSP student sponsored by the Club in 2013-2014, for whom the Richmonds were hosts.  He was also able to meet the Club’s student for 2016-2017, Fredrik Mazur, who will arrive in the U.S. during the coming week and have the family of Rotarian Larry Winter as his hosts.
 

John Richmond

New Member Induction

Membership Chair Tray Brantley introduced Shell Underwood for induction into the Club by President Bruce.
 

 

August 9th Birthdays and Anniversaries


Member Birthdays Birthday      
Minter, Barry Scott (SCOTT) 10-Aug      
Reed, Amanda (AMANDA) 11-Aug      
 
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday    
Satterfield, Kayanne Satterfield, Bruce A. 9-Aug    
Smith, Sandra Smith, Ralph 11-Aug    
Laugahter, Ben Laughter, R Lynette 11-Aug    
Johnson, Kathy Johnson, Larry Alan 13-Aug    
Rhoden, Dina Rhoden, W Scott 13-Aug    
Scott, Annelle Scott, Trammell 15-Aug    
 
 
Member Anniversaries Start Date Years Total  
No member anniversaries this period.    
 
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years  
Barnett, George S (SMITTY) Tammy 10-Aug 31  
Schwenn, John O. (JOHN) Judy 14-Aug 45  
 


Downtown Dalton: Prospects For Growth


By John Hutcheson


Above: Garrett Teems
 
Rotarian Patty Mooney introduced Garrett Teems, Director of the Dalton Downtown Development Authority.  After a previous stint at the DDDA, Garrett served as Director of the Dalton Convention and Visitors Bureau, where he earned statewide recognition for his development of visitor centers at Ringgold and Valdosta, before returning to the DDDA a month ago when his predecessor moved away from the area.
 
Garrett pointed out that Dalton has the fifth largest downtown in Georgia, with 300 businesses and about 3,000 jobs.  Presently only eleven properties are available for development, and several new businesses are scheduled to open in the near future.  During the day the area’s population triples, and one important goal is to retain some of those people after working hours and attract new ones by developing a vibrant nightlife, with a special focus on the college-age demographic.
 
Since 2006, when the City decided to revitalize its downtown, most of the streetscapes have been beautified with new lighting and plantings.  There has also been a strong interest in sustaining the area’s historic appearance, and the DDDA works closely with the Dalton Historic Preservation Commission.  Successful recent projects include the former Southern Railway Freight Depot, restored in 2009 and now the home of DDDA and the Visitors Center, and the old Post Office, renovated in 2013 to house the Chamber of Commerce and the Carpet and Rug Institute.  Proposals are now being solicited for work on the Western & Atlantic Depot, one of Dalton’s oldest and most historic structures.  Property owners’ interest in such undertakings has been encouraging, as may be seen in the rising number of façade grants.  Ranging as high as $5,000 and funded by the City on applications approved by the Historic Preservation Commission, these have increased from three in 2012 to five in 2014 and twelve in 2015.
 
Overall, the future of downtown Dalton appears to be the brightest in years, especially as new energy goes into unified planning for its place within the whole region rather than just in Dalton alone.  The Friday night concert series and the Screen on the Green movies have been very successful, as have the Dalton Green farmers’ market, which has averaged 375 attendees on Saturday mornings and is now held on Tuesday evenings as well.  A Beer Festival is scheduled for October 1, 2016, to coincide with the Georgia-Tennessee football game which will be shown on a Jumbotron screen at the old Lee Printing site on Hamilton Street—a location for gatherings being promoted simply as “The Spot.”  The City’s revision of its open-container alcohol ordinance will allow consumers of specified alcoholic beverages to move freely within the downtown area, defined as lying between Waugh Street on the north, Thornton Avenue on the west, East Morris Street on the south, and the railroad tracks on the east, so long as such beverages are purchased from designated downtown food and beverage establishments.  Law enforcement will be appropriately vigilant.
 
Responding to questions, Garrett said that no definite plans exist for new uses of the upper level of the parking deck next to the W & A Depot, although its structural issues have been resolved.   Regarding new or projected restaurants and bars, he mentioned Conductor’s, a bar and grill; Cold Creek Growlers, a beer shop where food will be catered by Hamilton’s; Cyra’s, a bar and restaurant located in the old El Sombrero space; and the Crescent City Tavern, another bar and grill.  There has also been some talk of reopening the Planet of the Grapes on the former terrace of the Landmark Building, above Maryville Jewelers.

Special Announcements
 
President Bruce called forward Rotarian Mike O’Neill to recognize him for his excellent photography at the Club’s weekly meetings and other events.  Mike’s skill and diligence are making significant contributions to the Club’s historical record.
 
President Bruce also informed the Club that the Board has acted on this year’s education and literacy initiatives by funding necessary repairs on the Big Red Reads bus in the amount of $3,495.85.  A decal bearing the Rotary logo will accordingly be affixed to the vehicle.

August 2nd Birthdays and Anniversaries


   
Member Birthdays Birthday    
Brunson, Kevin M (KEVIN) 2-Aug    
McDonald, David L (DAVID) 2-Aug    
Robertson, Cherri L (CHERRI) 2-Aug    
Bundros, Thomas A (TOM) 7-Aug    
Adcock, Don W. (DON) 8-Aug    
 
Partner Birthdays Member Name Birthday  
Robertson, Cherri Robertson, Ricky N 2-Aug  
Chandler, Susan Chandler, Robert M. 4-Aug  
 
Member Anniversaries      
No member anniversaries this period.  
 
Wedding Anniversaries Partner's Name Anniversary Years
Woodward, Philip F (PHIL) Betty 3-Aug 41
Bronson, William III(WILLIAM) Erica 5-Aug 20
Chappell, William J. (WILLIAM) Bennieta 6-Aug 60
Pierce, Sara C. (SKEETER) Lamar 7-Aug 50
Abernathy, Melburn H. (MEL) Gretchen 8-Aug 29


More than Books: Math Success Camp at the Northwest Georgia Regional Library


By John Hutcheson


Above: Rotarian Linda Blackmon (left) and former Rotarian Tangela Johnson (right)
 
Rotarian Linda Blackman opened a program on a recent activity at the Northwest Georgia Regional Library by pointing out how libraries are now far more than just lending agencies for books or other media; in many diverse ways they have become true learning centers with equipment and resources to meet a wide array of community needs.  Linda then introduced former Rotarian Tangela Johnson, Chair of the Dalton-Whitfield Library Board of Trustees and the initiator of a new outreach by the Library to support math instruction in the schools.
 
Tangela began by pointing to some math problems distributed to Club members on their tables, asking who had done well in math during their school years—relatively few responded affirmatively.  Tangela’s own math experiences and her daughter’s struggle have ta