HSV Rotary hears about learning through the arts





At its March 8 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village greeted Villager Craig Welle, executive director of Arkansas Learning through the Arts (ALTTA). The program connects local schools with professional artists who visit classrooms three or four times a year to enhance the teachers’ lesson plan by utilizing such art forms as dance, music, theater, poetry, storytelling, pottery, watercolor and crafts. In 2017-18, there were about 800 artist sessions reaching approximately 6,000 students. Throughout its five year history, ALTTA has reached about 20,000 students.
Welle was proud to note that in addition to Hot Springs, Fountain Lake and Jessieville, this year Mountain Pine has been added to the roster of schools served by Arkansas Learning through the Arts. Based on a highly successful program in Dallas, teachers can incorporate the artists’ work into the classroom curriculum, especially literacy.
Welle said, “Each entry point for learning features literacy. The more literate we become in various ways, the smarter we can become.” This was especially meaningful for the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club due to its efforts to improve local literacy. HSV Rotary has supported Arkansas Learning through the Arts through financial grants so the program can expand its work.   

  For more information about Arkansas Learning through the Arts, the website is http://altta.org/

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary

HSV Rotary on “Mission of Mercy”




Each year, dental health providers from around the state join together for ArMOM, or Arkansas Mission of Mercy, as hundreds of dental professionals and volunteers provide services free of charge for Arkansans of all ages who do not have insurance or the means to pay for dental care. Speaking to the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club on February 8, Villager Kristi Gipe Golden DDS of Plaza Carmona Dental Associates said she will be on hand to support the project. Once again, members of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club will participate in volunteer positions such as registration, patient escorts, pediatric helpers, hospitality, set-up and teardown.
In the past decade, tens of thousands of patients around the state have received millions of dollars in dental services, all without government assistance. Every year, dental professionals at the various ArMOM work stations serve hundreds of patients, many of whom wait overnight in line outside to get in. This year, ArMOM will be held at the Conway Expo Center, Thursday through Saturday April 26 – 28.
Connie Shoemaker of HSV Rotary is organizing club members to make the short trip to Conway for some or all of the event. Both Dr. Golden and Shoemaker emphasized the life-changing work of ArMOM. As Golden said, “It’s such a wonderful project. I can’t imagine not being part of it!”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary hears 3,500-year-old story




(From left) HSV Rotary president Steve Wright welcomes John Neale
and Jason Goslee, with Rotarian of the Day Bob Fiorendino at right


At its December 14 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village enjoyed a presentation that was 3,500 years in the making as John Neale of Mountain Valley Spring Water and Jason Goslee of Stonecipher Distributors were introduced by Rotarian Bob Fiorendino.
Mountain Valley Water, whose home is right here in Hot Springs, is called “America’s First Premium Water,” being founded in 1871. It has twice won the title of “Best Tasting Water in the World,” and is served across the nation. In his introduction, Fiorendino said he was recently at a high-end event in Sonoma, California, where they served Mountain Valley Water.
  Neale stated that Mountain Valley provides glass bottles of both still and sparkling water that is rich in minerals, sodium-free, and naturally high in alkalinity which helps with digestion. He stressed that the water is not imported from the other side of the world as well as being free of potential contaminants. “Our spring is located near absolutely nothing at all,” he said, adding that it is the oldest continuous water source in the country. “The water we are using now is at least 3,500 years old,” he said.
   As if that wasn’t impressive enough, Neale stated that Mountain Valley Water is provided to thoroughbred race horses and “It’s all Elvis would drink.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

 

HSV Rotary welcomes RYLA leaders of tomorrow



(From left) Emily Crumpton, Christine Chang, Emiley Burke, Josh Walpole, Lee Ann Branch, Destini Nichols, and HSV Rotary President Steve Wright

At its April 12 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed four local youths who are sure to be the leaders of tomorrow. One of the ways the club demonstrates its commitment to young people is by sponsoring students to attend the annual Rotary Youth Leadership Academy (RYLA).

RYLA is a leadership development program directed by Rotary International to promote leadership skills in young people. Some topics at the three-day camp include communication skills, conflict management, ethics, leadership fundamentals, and problem solving, along with community and global citizenship.

This year, RYLA was coordinated by Rotarians Lee Ann Branch and Christine Chang. Based on recommendations from their schools, four outstanding students were sponsored by HSV Rotary to attend RYLA camp April 5 to April 8 at the 4-H Center in Ferndale, Arkansas. They are junior Emiley Burke from Fountain Lake; sophomore Emily Crumpton from Jessieville, and sophomore Destini Nichols and junior Josh Walpole, both from Mountain Pine.
Burke is a member of the National Honor Society and recently attended the Governor’s 4.0 Luncheon in Little Rock. Crumpton is a member of the Beta Club, A/B Honor roll, and All American Cheer. Nichols is a member of the All A Honor Roll and also attended the Governor’s 4.0 Luncheon. Walpole is a member of the A/B Honor Roll, Beta Club, Gifted and Talented program, and Quizbowl team.  They each gave a brief speech for the Rotarians, describing their experience at RYLA camp. Each one said they would like to go back.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary inspired by Wheelchair Project



  

(From left) HSV Rotary President Steve Wright greets Noel Morris of Springdale as Rotarian of the Day Dennis Cooper looks on


At its April 5 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Noel Morris of the Springdale Rotary Club who presented an inspiring program about the Wheelchair Project. For the past 15 years, Morris and fellow Rotarians have been changing the lives of people who had little hope.
After learning about the Wheelchair Project, Morris challenged his home club with what he called the “Christmas idea.” He suggested to them that instead of buying someone a shirt or tie, to donate the money that would have been spent on a Christmas gift to making a life-changing donation. “With a match, we raised over $42,000 in 15 minutes,” he said.
Each year, Morris and a group go to different parts of Mexico to assemble and present both children’s and adult wheelchairs to grateful recipients. “One man had spent nine years in bed,” Morris stated. The man’s back had been broken in an accident at work. After receiving a wheelchair, the man now has mobility, works at a job, and is able to care for his family.
Morris said that aside from raising his two sons, the Wheelchair Project is the most important thing he has ever done. He added, “When you put someone in a chair, it changes two lives – theirs and yours.”

For more information on the Wheelchair Project, contact Noel Morris at nmorris@amwheelchair.org.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

Drone program soars for HSV Rotary



(From left) HSV Rotary President Steve Wright greets Villager Renee Steinpreis and Rotarian of the Day Ed Reinsch (at right)

 

At its March 29 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Villager Renee Steinpreis who presented a soaring program about aerial drones. In addition to demonstrating one, she presented a video of photos she took using her drone that showed the incredible beauty of HSV from the sky.
Steinpreis mentioned some of the pre-requisites for flying a drone, including licensure by the Federal Aviation Administration. To help newcomers learn the proper procedures as well as to provide fellowship for people who already fly drones as well as those who are interested, Steipreis says there is a special interest group through the HSV Computer Club. “There are already 32 members of the group, but not everyone has a drone,” she said, adding. “We are trying to protect the privilege of flying in the Village. People need to follow the rules.”
She also said that while flying drones is a relatively new pursuit, the members of the special interest group are “not kids. We are learning this stuff.”
Many of her breath-taking photos can be seen on the POA website as well as at various other sites, including the HSV Visitors Center in downtown Hot Springs. She said they are also available for viewing on YouTube by typing in her name. In conclusion, she said, “I feel so blessed to photograph the beauty of this place.”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

State Auditor Andrea Lea brings “treasure” to HSV Rotary





At its February 22 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed special guest Andrea Lea, State Auditor for Arkansas. In an informative, entertaining program, Lea described the duties of her office, which includes being the general accountant for the state and serving as payroll officer for individuals employed by the executive, judicial and legislative branches of government across Arkansas.
However, she said one of her most enjoyable duties is reuniting Arkansans with unclaimed property such as checks, stocks, bonds, rare coins and jewelry in the Great Arkansas Treasure Hunt. Hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of unclaimed property, including items forwarded from bank safe deposit boxes, is waiting in the vault of the Auditor’s office. Individuals can easily search by contacting the Unclaimed Properties Division at 1-800-CLAIM-IT or log on to ClaimItAR.com.
Auditor Lea provided significant examples: a list of about twenty current club members whose names are recorded on the database as having unclaimed property. Several left immediately after the meeting to start claiming their “treasures.”
For more information on the State Auditor, one of Arkansas’ seven constitutional offices, the website is www.auditor.ar.gov.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.
 
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HSV Rotary hears about Drug Take-Back contest




Often it is good to be in the Top Ten, but as the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club learned at its February 15 meeting, sometimes it is not. Garland County currently ranks tenth in the state for the highest rate of prescription drug abuse and misuse. Rotarian Amy Thomason introduced a guest speaker with a program to help combat that statistic.
Susie Reece, Prevention Specialist at CHI St. Vincent, announced a contest that runs until the end of April to see which law enforcement agency in Garland County can collect the most expired or unneeded prescription drugs.
The Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village purchased the drug take-back box for the HSV Police Department at 113 Calella Road. All Villagers are encouraged to use it by emptying unneeded drugs into a plastic bag and dropping them off at the take-back box.
HSV Police Chief Ricky Middleton said, “The take-back box is available 24/7. Last year, we collected 395 pounds of pills. We take them to Little Rock to be incinerated so our water supply does not become contaminated by the drugs being flushed down the drain.”

Reece and Middleton agreed that addiction often begins when drugs are taken from a family member’s medicine cabinet.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

Past Award Winners




ROTARY CLUB OF HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE

 

Past Presidents

1985 Gregory Miller

1985-86 Roy L. Foster, Jr.

1986-87 Roy L. Foster, Jr.

1987-88 Gene Parker

1988-89 Farrell (Bo) Lea

1989-90 J. David Gardner

1990-91 Timothy K. Shaw

1991-92 Gerald R. Bruni

1992-93 William L. Shepard

1993-94 Joseph E. Hardman

1994-95 Wayne E. Mirre

1995-96 Robert W. Anderson

1996-97 Art Jungnickel

1997-98 Jeff Farris

1998-99 Rick Rolfe

1999-2000 Gerald H. Quick

2000-01 Phil Shepard

2001-02 William A. Anderson

2002-03 Katheryn Pipho

2003-04 Thomas Arwood

2004-05 A.J. Hoover

2005-06 Thomas Mitchell

2006-07 Ken Seeley

Past Presidents, (cont)

2007-08 John Atherton

2008-09 Tony Cifelli

2009-10 Paul E. Bridges

2010-11 Steve Rogers

2011-12 Harvey W.C. Shelton

2012-13 Amy Thomason

2013-2014 Lee Ann Branch

2014-2015 Jeff Hollansworth

2015-2016 Linda Johnson

2016-2017 Donna Aylward

2017-2018 Steve Wright

  

ROTARY CLUB OF HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE

Major Club Awards

 

Rotarian of the Year

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06 Ross Johnson

2006-07

2007-08 Brian Anderson

2008-09 Paul E. Bridges

2009-10 Harvey W.C. Shelton

2010-11 John Atherton

2011-12 Joe Yoke

2012-13 Caryl Joy Young

2013-2014 John E. Goodwin

2014-2015 Paul Bridges

2015-2016 Larry Wilson

2016-2017 Lee Ann Branch

 

 

**Newspaper article shows Joe Hardman as “the first recipient of the Clark Deem Memorial Rotary of the Year Award.”  (Deem died in December of 2002.  Hardman died in May of 2013.)

Clark Deem Award

2002-03 Joseph Hardman**

2003-04 Bob Anderson

2004-05 Norm Bushee

2005-06 Brian Anderson

2006-07 Tony Cifelli

2007-08 Edward E. Reinsch

2008-09 John Atheron

2009-10 Tony Cifelli

2010-11 Mike Medica

2011-12 Lee Ann Branch

2012-13 Linda Johnson

2013-2014 Donna Aylward

2014-2015 John Atherton

2015-2016 Fred Kalsbeek

2016-2017 Connie    Shoemaker

 

 

 

 

 

Rookie of the Year

Lori McMinn 2013-2014 (LAB)

Sally Jelinek 2016-2017 (DA)



Presidents Message




Greetings!!

The Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village would like to welcome you to our website.

If you are looking for a place to make new friends and engage in helping others, then you’ve come to the right place.

Our club is a collection of community leaders, business professionals, and volunteers that want to make a difference both locally and world wide.

With the motto “Service Above Self” we look for ways to express this sentiment through our fundraising and giving initiatives.  We give locally as well as world wide.

There are 1,200,000 Rotarians in 34,000 clubs doing good in over 200 countries.  This network of clubs makes up Rotary International.

Please consider this a personal invitation to visit one of our weekly meetings held every Thursday morning at 7:00am (breakfast at 6:30am) in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Samaritan, 121 Cortez Road, Hot Springs Village, AR.

With sincere regards,

Steve Wright

Club President 2017-2018

 



HSV Rotary honors POA employees



HSV Rotary looks at Air Force One




At its March 1 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village took a rare look inside the presidential aircraft, Air Force One. As an Air Force Major, Villager Dan Turney planned 33 trips, both stateside and abroad, for the U.S. President and his team.
Starting with the question he is always asked, Turney mentioned the 1997 film “Air Force One” with Harrison Ford. “It’s a pretty good movie,” said Turney, “but it’s not true. The plane doesn’t have an escape pod or parachutes or door out the back, though the seat cushions can be used as a floatation device. The movie did do a good job with the onboard conference room, which was pretty accurate.”
Turney served on the advance team which goes out before each presidential trip aboard Air Force One to check out the landing area and logistics. He showed slides of the aircraft’s interior, including amenities available to guests such as playing cards, menus, napkins, itinerary and M&M’s candy, all of which tend to disappear after each trip as souvenirs. Turney also said there is a putting green aboard the plane. “We travel with our golf clubs,” he laughed.
  For more information about Air Force One, the website is

https://web.archive.org/web/20090122232607/http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/air_force_one/

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary introduced to African wildlife




At its January 25 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village heard from Harv Shelton who shared some fascinating facts and photos from a recent trip to South Africa. With his wife Millie, Shelton took a photo safari among animals at the Kruger National Park, a game preserve about the size of Massachusetts.
Shelton shared his photographic journey as the safari drove close by majestic animals including leopards, rhinos and giraffes. He recalled their vehicle being in the middle of “about 25 to 30 elephants on both sides of the road,” and passing “nine or ten lions taking a siesta.” There were also hyenas, baboons, jackals and wild dogs along with the impala, which Shelton said are “called McDonald’s by locals because they are everywhere, they are fast food, and they have an ‘M’ shape on their rump.”
He explained that he had no photos of tigers because there are no tigers in Africa. He also said that second-most-dangerous animal in Africa is the hippo, with the most dangerous being humans. There were several shots of birds on the backs of large animals because the birds eat insects such as ticks and chiggers feeding on the warm-blooded mammals. He also said the zebra has its stripes because stinging flies will not land on the black-and-white pattern, and not, as one wag suggested, “to make them look thinner.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are invited to attend the entertaining, informative programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary hears about “cool new vibe” in Hot Springs




At its January 18 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village heard from Cole McCaskill, vice president of economic development for the Hot Springs Metro Partnership, a public/private partnership that includes Villagers Lesley Nalley and Tom Arwood among its members. McCaskill shared the good news that in the past few years, downtown Hot Springs is booming, with 86 new businesses opening and $80 million in capital investment, which he said was about three times the average investment for downtown areas in Arkansas.

McCaskill said the turning point was the fire that destroyed the Majestic Hotel in February of 2014. “The fire played out like a saga in the media,” he said. “Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, that generated the first leads from early investors who had a nostalgic connection to Hot Springs.”

He cited many of the exciting new businesses that have given downtown Hot Springs what he called a “cool new vibe,” adding that the city has received millions of dollars in free publicity from the national press for its historical commercial real estate like the Superior Bathhouse Brewery, which he said is the only place in the world that makes its beer from thermal waters.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are invited to attend the entertaining, informative programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary grant helps feed the elderly




Through activities that put the “fun” in “fundraising,” the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club is able to help support worthy causes around the corner and around the world. At their January 11 meeting, HSV Rotary presented a check to Villager Charles Hood, representing the Project Hope Food Bank.
Past club president Linda Johnson sponsored a grant application for Project Hope, saying, “I attended a Chamber meeting which discussed the problem of hunger among the elderly, some who have to choose between medication and food. It touched my soul.”
Project Hope utilizes private donations to purchase food at wholesale prices. The group then distributes hundreds of emergency food boxes to various agencies in our area at no charge, helping to provide a week of much-needed meals for the elderly. Hood said that every year, Arkansas is ranked Number One or Two in the nation for food insecurity among the elderly, stating, “We trade places back and forth with Mississippi.”
With the help of grant money from HSV Rotary, perhaps Project Hope can change that. Hood said that the volunteers of Project Hope receive no state or federal funds, adding, “If it weren’t for our volunteers, we couldn’t do the work we do.”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary hears reminder for the new year




For their first meeting of 2018, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed guest speaker Karen Reagler who reminded club members that the new year is the perfect time to check important documents.
Reagler, an attorney with offices in Hot Springs and the Village, specializes in estate planning. Since many Villagers have moved from someplace else, she touched on some Arkansas laws regarding wills and estates that may be different from other states. She said that this is a perfect time to check those documents to see if the life situation of beneficiaries and/or executors has changed due to relocating, health issues, etc. For those who include planned giving in their estate, it is a good time to make sure their favorite charity has not changed.
For people who keep essential documents in a safe deposit box, she said it is important that an authorized person can open it if the box-holder is unable. Reagler also suggested making a detailed list of assets. If such information is kept online, she suggested ensuring that required passwords are available.
“The more organized you are, the better it will be for those who will walk in your shoes,” Reagler said. Noting all the veterans in HSV Rotary, she added, “If you have questions, talk to a military person or their spouse. When it comes to being organized, they are the best!”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary honors benefactors




(From left) HSV Rotary Foundation chair Grover Scarborough
with Paul Harris Fellows Dennis Cooper, Norm Bushee, Fred Kalsbeek
and Peggy Yeric, with HSV Rotary President Steve Wright at right.
(unavailable for photo were fellow recipients Joe Beja, Sue Ratcliffe, Dick Breckon and Ruth Breckon).


At its December 21 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village honored members whose generosity exemplifies the Rotary motto, “Service Above Self.” Villager Grover Scarborough, who chairs HSV Rotary’s charitable foundation, noted that one of the highest honors in Rotary is being recognized as a Paul Harris Fellow, named for the Chicago attorney who founded Rotary International in 1905.
The most recent group of Villagers who attained this honor were Joe Beja, Dick Breckon, Ruth Breckon, Norm Bushée, Dennis Cooper, Fred Kalsbeek, Sue Ratcliffe, and Peggy Yeric. They join the ranks of other club members who have been honored in the past.
The Paul Harris Fellowship acknowledges individuals who contribute to the Rotary Foundation at various levels of giving. In doing so, Paul Harris Fellows join Bill and Melinda Gates in attempting to eradicate polio worldwide.
In 1988, just thirty years ago, polio was reported in 125 countries, crippling hundreds of thousands of people, usually children. Since then, Rotary has matched several hundred million dollars in challenge grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation thanks to contributions from Paul Harris Fellows and the Rotary Foundation. By 2016, polio was found only in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria, with fewer than forty cases reported worldwide.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursday mornings at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs as well as learning more about the fun and fellowship of Rotary. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on Facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary Helps Plant 100 Trees as Part of Global Initiative




Left to right, HSV Rotary President Steve Wright, Dennis Cooper, Marvin Case, Bobbie Bateman, Sally Jelinek, Spence Jordan, DeeDee Autry, Mary Christians, Tony Cifelli, Jim Zahnd, John Weidert, Melissa Jenks, Tom Elliott, Clif Haygood, Jerry Sorenson, Connie Shoemaker, John Dayton, Grover Scarborough

The Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village recently teamed with the Nature Conservancy of Arkansas as well as men from Teen Challenge to plant 100 trees on the nearby Davis Ranch. The site is just east of Hot Springs Village and north of Highway 5.
Years ago the ranch had dredged and straightened out a tributary to the Middle Fork of the Saline River to drain pastureland. The owners recently granted access to the Nature Conservancy to restore the tributary to its natural state. The Conservancy has completed work on the regrading and filling of the tributary to its natural flow and elevations, and now is reforesting the ten acres surrounding the stream.
The Middle Fork is a source of drinking water for the Village and surrounding communities. The restoration work and reforestation will drastically reduce the amount of sediment and waste that flows into the river.
One of the initiatives of Ian Risely, President of Rotary International, is to have each Rotary Club member in every club world-wide plant a tree. That effort would mean a total of 1,200,000 trees. The ninety-plus members of the HSV Rotary Club took this challenge to heart, making arrangements to work with the Nature Conservancy on this local reforestation project.
On the chilly morning of October 25, seventeen Rotarians along with fourteen men from Teen Challenge and representatives of the Conservancy met at the site. They planted 100 native hardwood trees, including willows, oak, and chinquapin. The workers were treated throughout the morning to snacks, beverages, and sandwiches provided by the Conservancy.
According to HSV Rotary president Steve Wright, “HSV Rotary sincerely thanks the men of Teen Challenge for their help in this project, and the Conservancy for their vital role in keeping our forests and streams healthy.”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.
 

Top “Nighthawks” visit HSV Rotary




With National Park College in Hot Springs recently adopting the mascot of “Nighthawks,” several of the most high-flying representatives of NPC visited the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village on June 22. Introduced by General Tom Arwood, the guest speaker was Hot Springs banker Forrest Spicher, chair of the NPC Board of Trustees. Spicher in turn presented his guests: NPC president Dr. John Hogan; Jeff Weaver, NPC’s vice president for external affairs, and a loyal friend, Villager Paul Grasse, nationally-recognized award winner from the Boy Scouts of America. Saline County Judge Jeff Arey was also on hand to hear the latest about NPC, which attracts students from all over Central Arkansas.
Spicher stated that economic opportunity in our area is a concern but higher education is the solution. He declared that the Hot Springs community is a great place to visit, to live, and to retire, with the challenge being to offer career training and jobs that will encourage our young people to stay in this area.  

Spicher stated that NPC offers career pathways in such in-demand areas healthcare as well as technical and traditional academic coursework. The college also partners with area high schools to provide concurrent enrollment, giving students a head start on college. “Learning is our focus,” he said, “and student success is our goal.”
He concluded his presentation with a quote from NPC President Hogan, which he said summed up the value of higher education for our community in a nutshell: “More learning means more earning.”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary welcomes 2017-2018 officers




HSV Rotary welcomes 2017-2018 officers
With each Rotary year beginning on July 1, a new president and board of directors are installed annually. This year, the gavel is passed by outgoing president Donna Aylward to incoming president Steve Wright who will serve during 2017-18. Other officers for the coming year include president-elect Nancy Hendricks, Lori McMinn as vice-president, treasurer Harv Shelton, and Jim Zahnd as secretary.

Rotary board members direct the club’s areas of service. These include (alphabetically) Paul Bridges in charge of service projects, Mary Christians as membership chair, Gary Jacobs leading the grants program, fundraising chair Lydia McCarthy, Grover Scarborough heading up the Rotary Foundation, Jerry Sorenson in the public relations position, and club service led by Bob Sweeten. Ross Johnson directs the Charity Corporation, and webmaster is Larry Wilson. In addition, Anthony Cifelli, an HSV Rotary club member, serves the region as Assistant District Governor.
Incoming president Steve Wright said, “I am so honored to be the next president of the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village. When I joined this club seven years ago, I had no idea what Rotary was all about. I soon learned that the focus of this club is having fun with each other, raising money for worthy causes, and serving others in our community and world. It is such a privilege to help steer this club as we look forward to another great Rotary year!”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary meets “hidden victims of crime”




The Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village is honored to provide charitable gifts through its fundraising activities to help deserving causes. At their June 8 meeting, club members had the opportunity to see a great example of their efforts.
Villager Bill Monson presented a slide show spotlighting children helped by the Dick Johnston Camp, a nondenominational summer program for children of incarcerated parents. “These children are the hidden victims of crime,” said Monson. “They are traumatized, and they feel guilt and fear. Often, they are really orphans. One child saw the mother murdered by the father. These kids are sometimes raised by grandparents or other family members, or are put into foster care. The camp also provides a week of respite for the caregiver.”

In an atmosphere of sunshine, natural beauty and fresh air, the children are taught to swim and to help with a working farm, often the first time they have seen real food being grown. With a caring staff, they experience hiking and fishing as well as real-world opportunities to build character. Since many read well below their grade level, there are exercises in literacy; each child may go home with about a dozen books.  
Depending on funds, the camp is able to serve about forty children each year out of almost 900 who have been identified by the Prison Fellowship list. Monson expressed appreciation for HSV Rotary’s contribution to the effort through its annual sponsorship of a deserving child.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


African itinerary for HSV Rotary




In recent weeks, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village has been privileged to travel around the world through fascinating presentations by guest speakers. On June 1, their itinerary was Africa. Villager Sally Jelinek, originally from England, has been a world traveler since childhood when her parents worked for the United Nations. She has lived in West, East and Central Africa, but concentrated on Central Africa for her Rotary program.
She lived in the former country of Northern Rhodesia which is today known as Zambia, with its neighbor Southern Rhodesia now called Zimbabwe. Showing pictures of the majestic scenery, including the awesome beauty of Victoria Falls, Jelinek described her career of escorting photographic safaris that took place under conditions she described as “rustic.” But, she added, “Imagine going to sleep at night hearing the call of elephants and the roar of lions. That’s something you can’t do in a modern lodge.”

She also related incidents involving the wild animals who crossed their path as the travelers rode in an open-top vehicle, emphasizing that the animals were wild – “not a petting zoo.” Once, on a cold day, a bull elephant came up to the safari group and sat on the hood of their car for warmth. “He stayed there for an hour,” Jelinek recalled, “leaving me to explain the dents.”
By the end of her presentation, Rotarians felt much closer to the fascination of the “dark continent.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary “travels” to China




Visiting Kennedy & Company CPAs, Rotarian Ed Reinsch enjoyed hearing about Amanda Kennedy’s recent trip to China so much that he invited her to speak at the Hot Spring Village Rotary Club. Presenting a slide show full of fascinating photos, Kennedy helped club members feel they were touring the huge, mysterious country along with her.

Along with family members, Kennedy spent fifteen days in China which she said was “not nearly enough.” She became interested after seeing a bargain rate for the all-inclusive trip, which Kennedy said was due to the Chinese government’s interest in boosting their tourism industry.
The family flew into Beijing where they toured well-known stops like the Temple of Heaven, Forbidden City and Tiananmen Square. Their guide then escorted them into Old Beijing, a less-traveled area which Kennedy said was more peaceful and quiet.
They went on to tour the Great Wall, which had been begun in the seventh century BC to keep nomadic tribes out, then fast-forwarded into the twenty-first century to visit the Olympic Village with its “Bird’s Nest” arena, site of the 2008 Olympic Games. Also memorable was seeing the site of the Terracotta Soldiers created in the third century BC, and taking a Yangtze River cruise.
Kennedy pointed out that China is currently focusing on literacy and clean water, causes which are also pursued around the world by Rotary International. By the end of Kennedy’s presentation, Rotarians felt they had enjoyed the China trip right along with her.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary wins District awards




The Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village belongs to District 6170 which includes Arkadelphia, Benton/Bauxite/Bryant, Camden, Conway, El Dorado, Magnolia, Monticello, Pine Bluff and Russellville. Each year, a district conference is held in one of the host cities. This year, the conference was held close to home, in beautiful Hot Springs. Highlighting the event was the annual recognition of top clubs, and HSV Rotary found its place at the top.

Among the honors HSV Rotary won were being third for highest average giving to the charitable Rotary Foundation and second for highest weekly club attendance. The Hot Springs Village club came in at second place for Club of the Year based on all its activities and charitable work.
First place honors went to HSV Rotary for having the most Paul Harris Fellows in 2016-17. Named for Paul P. Harris, who founded Rotary International in 1905, the recognition acknowledges those who contribute $1,000 or more to the Rotary Foundation for its charitable work.
In addition, the Presidential Leadership Award went to this year’s club president, Villager Donna Aylward, who said, “I’m so proud to be a member of the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village!  We are honored to be recognized by our District Leadership. However, our club did not need to be presented with awards for me to know that the membership is made up of some of the hardest working, philanthropic and supportive people I have had the privilege to know in Hot Springs Village. It has truly been a wonderful year of ‘service above self’ opportunities as we assisted with a variety of programs and events in the Village and surrounding communities.  I’ve been very privileged to serve as President of the club this year!”

At each District Conference, a random drawing is held for “Where in the World for Dinner,” a chance to fly and dine anywhere in the world. This year’s winner was none other than Donna Aylward, a first for the HSV club. “I was very surprised and excited to be notified that I had won the District’s ‘Where in the World’ fundraiser,” she said. “My husband Dan and I have had so much fun deciding how to use our two tickets to go anywhere in the world to have dinner! Although we haven’t made final arrangements as of this time, Hawaii, Costa Rica, and Iceland are some of the places on the list!”

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotary hears about “excellent adventure”




At its May 11 meeting, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club heard from Villagers Jeff and Darla Hollansworth. Darla introduced the program, saying, “When I met Jeff 28 years ago, before we were married, he had a picture of a boat on his white board. Last November, he finally got it.”
Bringing it home to Arkansas was the challenge, since the boat in question was in Canada. Named “Horizon,” it is a fifty-foot 2006 Carver with twin Volvo Diesel motors. On their excellent adventure, Jeff and Darla traveled 1,300 miles on the trip which started at Georgian Bay in Ontario and took 23 days.
The couple, whose only nautical experience had been a ski boat, had to get used to the craft itself, learn to read charts, navigate, interpret weather maps, find fuel, work with buoys and fenders, face storms, and work their way around barges, under bridges and through locks. They traveled up Lake Huron, through the Northern Passage, down the east coast of Lake Michigan and onto the Illinois Ship Canal before traveling down the Deplanes River, Illinois River, Mississippi River, White River, and Arkansas River before arriving in Little Rock on Thanksgiving Day.
After describing some hair-raising adventures along the way, Jeff Hollansworth told the club, “Don’t be afraid to dream big. Follow your dream and don’t think about all the ways you might fail, just follow your dreams and make them come true.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary learns about Lifelong Learning Institute




At its May 4 meeting, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club heard from Rotarian Larry Wilson, who is steering committee chair for the nonprofit Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI) of Hot Springs Village. He described the transition of the program since last August when it began as a partnership by a group of Village residents and UALR Benton.

UALR has assisted LLI with in-kind support in areas such as registration and collection of fees. With a change in leadership and mutually friendly agreement, LLI will no longer be affiliated with UALR after 2017. “The consensus was that Hot Springs Village really embraced the lifelong learning concept,” said Wilson. “It helps keeps the brain active, and can provide subjects like Arkansas history for people who have moved here from other states.”
Wilson foresees two programs a month, one large and one smaller in nature. Possible programs include a visit to the Governor’s Mansion and the Central High School Historic Site in Little Rock. “There might be a wine-tasting class along with a trip to Arkansas wineries,” Wilson said. “There has also been interest in having a class on smoking meats,” he added.
Wilson emphasized that while LLI hopes to partner with the Hot Springs Village POA in terms of providing an amenity for residents, there will be no support services or funding from the POA. “We are thinking just to add the Lifelong Learning Institute as an another benefit of living in the Village,” said Wilson, who stressed that while LLI can seek grants as a nonprofit, each event has to pay for itself. More information about LLI will soon be available.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Ouachita Children’s Center illuminated for HSV Rotary




At its April 13 meeting, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club gave a warm welcome to a good friend. Linda Lampman Ragsdale is the daughter of the late Ed Lampman, a beloved former member of the club who passed away last August at age 99. Ragsdale is executive director of the Ouachita Children’s Center (OCC) in Hot Springs, and gave the group a first-hand account of the work OCC does.
OCC serves children in crisis, from age 6 to 17. Some are abused or neglected, others are homeless, and some have committed minor infractions of the law. When they come to OCC, children might have been abused or injured while almost all are scared, confused, and homesick. Ragsdale and her caring staff offer short-term emergency shelter, individualized counseling, and life skills classes for both the young people and their families. The children are given opportunities for personal growth which allow them to get back on track for lifelong success.
Ragsdale said that when she joined OCC, she found that the facility had the reputation for being “the place where bad kids go.” Today, OCC is known as a positive environment where young people who have come from bad circumstances can find adults who care about them. In an atmosphere of compassion, trust, and stability, OCC provides a place for them to be safe, to learn, to thrive, to re-join the community and – being children – even to have fun.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotarians hear about Haiti




At its March 30 meeting, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club gave a warm welcome to one of its own: Dr. Walter “Bubba” Smith, senior pastor at Christ of the Hills United Methodist Church in the Village. For the twentieth year, Dr. Smith made his annual week-long visit to the Caribbean country of Haiti where his team performs humanitarian work. With an unemployment rate of 70% and an average per capita income of $480, Haiti is the poorest country in the western hemisphere. However, the Rotary presence there is strong, with the Rotary emblem seen on projects completed by the service organization in almost every Haitian community.
There is a local Rotary Club chapter in Pignon, Haiti, the center of Dr. Smith’s activities. This year, HSV Rotarians contributed to purchasing bright yellow shirts with the Rotary emblem for the Pignon club so the Haitian Rotarians can be identified when performing service projects for their community. Bringing education, clean water, foot bridges, solar panels, housing, and healthcare to Haiti is a priority for Rotary clubs across the U.S.
But Dr. Smith and his team also bring items most Americans take for granted such as toys for children. Noticing a group of Haitian kids playing soccer with a plastic bottle, the team brought real soccer balls. Dr. Smith also told the story of an 86-year-old Haitian woman called “Grandma” who had no family, and slept atop a straw mat on a dirt floor. When presented with a real mattress for the first time, she said she could die happy. Three days later, she passed away. Rotarians who wondered if their efforts made a difference realized they certainly made a difference for “Grandma.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotarians welcome Hot Springs Chamber President




At its March 23 meeting, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club gave a warm welcome to Jim Fram, president of the Hot Springs Chamber of Commerce. He discussed the ongoing results of the Chamber’s strategic plan which was developed with an eye to the growth and enhancement of the region.
Noting that transportation was at the top of the list, Fram thanked Villager Tom Arwood for his efforts in the “Pave It Forward” initiative which will result in construction of the extended expressway between Hot Springs Village and Hot Springs. “Roads go both ways,” Fram said, noting the relationship between the city of Hot Springs and The Village.
With around three million tourists coming to Hot Springs each year, he feels that many are interested in discovering The Village. For current HSV residents, Fram said there will be about ten million dollars in capital improvements in the Hot Springs area this year, which will enhance the region’s quality of life for everyone.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotarians foster youth leadership




Members of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club take a strong interest in our area’s young people, recognizing that they are the leaders of tomorrow. One of the ways the club demonstrates its commitment is by sponsoring local students to attend the annual Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) camp each April.

RYLA is a leadership development program directed by Rotary International to promote leadership skills in young people. Some topics at the three-day camp include communication skills, conflict management, ethics, leadership fundamentals, problem solving, and community and global citizenship.

This year, based on recommendations from their high schools, three outstanding students will be sponsored by HSV Rotary to attend RYLA camp at the 4-H Center in Ferndale, Arkansas. At the March 16 meeting, HSV Rotary met the RYLA students and their parents – Kelly Currington and mom Shannon of Mountain Pine; Haley Riggs and mom Christy from Fountain Lake; and Grace Robertson with mom Holly of Jessieville.
Speaking to the group, Grace noted that she is in Future Business Leaders of America, on the cheer team, and is a 4.0 student. Kelly is junior class president, president of the Book Club, and vice president of Beta Club and Future Business Leaders. Haley, who has been a 4.0 student since the beginning of sophomore year, is a member of the Cobra Marching Band and Color Guard as well as Key Club, Beta Club, and National Honor Society.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets weekly in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

HSV Rotarians to celebrate Mother’s Day 2017




By popular demand, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club is sponsoring the third annual Mother’s Day Celebration. The 2017 champagne brunch will be at Coronado Center on Sunday, May 14, beginning at 12:30 p.m. It will be a great way for Villagers to honor mothers, wives, or other special women in their lives without having to leave the gates.
For the convenience of Villagers, tickets will be available at the Rotary booth at the HSV Community Fair at Coronado Center on Wednesday, April 5, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The planning committee is led by Villager Sally Jelinek who promises a first class event with soft music and brunch catered by Chef Johnna. In addition, CDi Photography will be providing free professional photos at the event. Tickets are only $27.50 each, thanks to the generous support of sponsors including Ouachita Hearth and Patio, Relyance Bank, Re-Max of Hot Springs Village, Lydia McCarthy/Big Red Realty, Ike Eisenhauer, and Good Samaritan Society.

With a capacity crowd in the past, tickets will be going fast. They will also be available starting April 17 at the Ponce de Leon Center ticket office as well as through hsvticketsales.com.
According to special events chair Lydia McCarthy, “The HSV Rotary Club Mother’s Day Celebration has become a Village tradition. No need to leave the gates on Mother’s Day to honor that very special lady in our lives in a very special way!”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Arkansas Treasurer Milligan visits HSV Rotary





At their March 2 meeting, Hot Springs Village Rotarians welcomed Dennis Milligan, Treasurer of the State of Arkansas. Having served four years as Saline County Circuit Clerk, Treasurer Milligan greeted many old friends in the room, including current Saline County Justice and Villager Jim Zahnd.
Treasurer Milligan stressed that his office, which acts as the “state’s bank,” upholds three major priorities. The first is transparency, so Arkansans can see exactly how their tax dollars are handled. Second is a “No Gifts” policy for any staff member at any time. Third is an active approach to return on investment for the taxpayer’s funds which are collected by his office. He noted that since he was elected in 2014, he has seen interest income almost double. “Every dollar we earn in interest is one less dollar that taxpayers have to pay,” he said.
He also revealed the “best kept secret in Arkansas,” which is the 529 GIFT plan, a savings account for the education of children, grandchildren or friends. More information is at www.arkansas529.org.  
Treasurer Milligan stated that his office is the most-toured facility in the Capitol – “but not to see me,” he laughed. The historic vault attracts crowds, with Arkansas being the only state to allow people to have access to their state Treasurer’s vault. An online photo tour is available at www.arteasury.gov.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary, Lesley Nalley honor POA employees




At their February 23 meeting, Hot Springs Village Rotarians welcomed Lesley Nalley, chief executive officer of the Hot Springs Village POA. She brought along some special guests: POA employees who have gone above and beyond to make Hot Springs Village the best place in the world to live.
Nalley introduced the recipients of this year’s POA incentive awards which were announced at the recent POA annual meeting and who were also recognized with a gift awarded by the HSV Rotary Club. Henry Falgout developed an innovative low-cost method for fertilizing De Soto golf course. Mike Sykora designed a method of clearing leaves from large areas, building the equipment from scrap. The Public Utility team of Chris Boutzale, Larry Hefley, and Joey Stadler devised a plan to repair a leak under a huge water tank where every day we were losing 50,000 gallons of water flowing down a hillside. Because of its location, the leak was said to be almost impossible to fix – until the team fixed it. Village residents saved precious water and about $50,000 due to the team’s creative “outside the tank” thinking.
Nalley then touched on questions which often come up at public meetings. One is if the Village is having an “identity crisis” as to whether we are a retirement community or otherwise. She discussed how the marketing plan includes various demographics, with the strongest segment focusing on retirees. She also announced public roundtable discussions in March covering various Village topics.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotarians discover the Discovery Center




At their February 9 meeting, Hot Springs Village Rotarians discovered the Hot Springs Village Discovery Center which opened last Labor Day on Central Avenue in downtown Hot Springs. As an employee of the Hot Springs Village POA, Discovery Center manager Susan Feucht was introduced by Rotarian Stephanie Heffer, the POA’s director of Lifestyle and Community Development.
The Discovery Center is conveniently located next to the Arlington Hotel, and is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Susan noted that the beautiful autumn months of September through November were busy ones, averaging about two hundred visitors each month.
She said her goal is to build relationships and really get to know the visitors who come to the center. “It’s important to find out what their interests are, what they are really looking for, and what information they are interested in,” she stated, adding that local businesses are very pleased that Hot Springs Village has a presence in downtown Hot Springs.  
Feucht is the only full-time staff member, although there are also are two part-time staffers. Entering the pleasant space of the Discovery Center, visitors immediately notice the large television screens playing continuous loops of lovely scenes from the Village. Along with brochures, there is an interactive map screen illuminating the various areas of the Village. Feucht says she tries to stay in touch with people she connects with at the Discovery Center as well as leads from on-line inquiries.  
Her enthusiasm about Hot Springs Village is contagious and is a strong selling point, though she shares the credit with Villagers themselves, saying that they are often the Village’s best salespeople.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


American flags saluted at HSV Rotary




Rotarians pride themselves on patriotism and knowledge of American history. At the February 2 meeting of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club, many members were stunned to learn how much they didn’t know about our nation’s flag – or rather, flags.
Villager Dennis Zymboly and wife Rhonnie presented a fascinating program on the development of the “Stars and Stripes,” complete with an assortment of full-size banners from even before our nation was founded as a country. For example, American flags flown before the Revolution featured a pine tree. This was to honor the friendly reception given to the Pilgrims by Native Americans who called themselves “Children of the Pine.”
“It is very unlikely that Betsy Ross had anything to do with the American flag,” said Zymboly. The first public reference to Betsy Ross was in 1870 by her grandson, followed by a painting done in 1893 by a friend of the grandson who had purchased a house allegedly owned by Betsy Ross with plans to turn it into a museum.
Zymboly displayed the “snake” flags, including the pre-Revolutionary “Join or Die” as well as the famous “Don’t Tread on Me” banner. He also noted the payment requested in 1777 by George Hopkinson, who submitted a bill for the first American flag with thirteen stars and thirteen stripes: “Two casks of secondary wine.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Fountain Lake superintendent “FACES” Rotarians




After a glowing introduction by School Board member Sheila Ford, Fountain Lake School District superintendent Michael Murphy spoke to the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club on January 26. He brought them up to date on the many positive things happening for the 1,450 students at Fountain Lake as well as the surrounding community which includes Hot Springs Village.
Two of the most promising programs include the “Great Kindness Challenge,” which was described as encouraging children from an early age to practice random acts of kindness wherever they might be needed. Dr. Murphy said, “The Kindness Challenge did not happen by accident. We had to ask ourselves what we wanted our school to become, and what that would look like in a 21st-century environment.”
The other program is an afterschool offering called “FACES,” which stands for “Faculty And Community Enriching Students.” The program is funded through a grant and serves about 250 students as an extension of learning as well as providing stability and recreation for young people. About 120 students in FACES come from Hot Springs Village. Dr. Murphy noted the wealth of talent and experience in the Village, encouraging Villagers to get involved with FACES. He added, “Our goal is to connect one adult with every child.”
The meeting ended with an appropriate quote from Henry Thoreau: “We are not put into the world to do everything, but to do something.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotarians do well at doing good




Members of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club take pride in the Rotary motto, “Service Above Self.” As a group, the club is involved in worthy causes such as maintaining the Veterans’ Memorial outside the Ponce de Leon Center, and cleaning up our roadsides during Village Pride Week.
But Rotarians also involve themselves in good causes as individuals. Each new member told that joining the Rotary Club does not automatically make you a Rotarian - that is an honor you must attain for yourself. It means demonstrating good character “even when no one is looking.”
Villager Melanie Pederson personifies what it means to be a Rotarian. Most area residents know Melanie from her tireless efforts directing the annual Village Walk for Cancer Research. The 16th annual Walk will take place on September 30, with more information to follow.
But even while she is busy planning for that event, Melanie volunteers to help feed over 900 families each month in Garland and Saline Counties through the Faith Fellowship Food Pantry. She says, “We prepare boxes that contain staples, and bag up food that includes meat, dairy, milk, bread and pastry. We are a faith-based group and pray before we start to load the food into cars, and are often asked to pray with some of the men and women who come through the line.”
Pederson is also involved with the HSV Police Academy, Chamber of Commerce, Village SCAT, and Friends of Hot Springs Village. In addition, she teaches a fitness class to promote the health and wellness of her fellow Villagers. When asked why she does so much, she simply attributes it to “service above self.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary


County judges present ‘State of the Counties’




After some good-natured jokes between friends, the county judges of Garland and Saline Counties presented a ‘State of the Counties’ address at the January 12 meeting of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club. The cooperation between judges Jeff Arey of Saline County and Rick Davis of Garland County has proven beneficial to Hot Springs Village, where 60% is in Garland County and 40% is in Saline.
In Arkansas, a county judge is the chief executive officer for county government, responsible for approving the disbursement of county funds, operating the county road system and county courts, accepting grants, and administering ordinances enacted by the Quorum Court. The county judge also has jurisdiction relating to county taxes including real estate and personal property taxes collected by county government. A few of the departments county judges generally oversee include the county attorney, road department, office of emergency services, and planning board.
For the State of the Counties address, the judges were introduced by Saline County Justice Jim Zahnd, who quoted Calvin Coolidge in saying, “What we need is not more federal government, but better local government.” The first speaker was County Judge Rick Davis of Garland County. Judge Davis prefaced his remarks by stating that the duties of a county judge include budget, infrastructure, and the well-being of the county’s people. Looking back at 2016, Davis said that Garland County has paid off a $42 million debt, tax revenues are up, and a portion of the sales tax ended on Dec. 31. He said, “2017 will be busy. The Expressway bonds have been sold and we have the money in the bank, so we are pushing to start land acquisition in January 2017 instead of June.” Judge Davis said Garland County is also looking at bridge infrastructure and roads that are often congested.
One of Garland County’s top priorities for 2017 is dealing with a county-wide radio communications issue. “No one can communicate with each other in a disaster,” said Davis, having experienced it first-hand during the ice storm of 2011. “We are trying to solve the problem by going to a new system that will improve 911 response,” said Davis. He also spoke about the 2017 state legislative session and its potential effects on the counties, especially the efforts of some state agencies to take a greater portion of resources that had been going to the counties.
Saline County Judge Jeff Arey spoke next, saying, “Things are going well in Saline County. We are the sixth largest county in the state, and are experiencing steady growth. We are always near the top of any study of average median income, and we are one of only two counties in Arkansas with no sales tax. We live and die off of property taxes, so we thank Villagers who live in Saline County.”
Looking at infrastructure, Arey said, “Highway 5 improvements have already begun, and there will be more to come, such as straightening curves. There will be widening of I-30 and also Highway 70 from I-30 to Hot Springs. We’re sorry for the inconvenience while construction is going on,” he said, “but it will be great when it’s all done.”
Judge Arey also noted the expansion of the Saline County Sheriff’s office, including an evidence warehouse and training center. He said the county is looking at turning sites like the Old River Bridge into a hike-and-bike trail, which he hopes will become part of a county-wide trail system. “We have received $6 million in grants which have gone toward airport hangars and terminal as well as firefighting equipment, parks and a community center. The proposed Center for Technical Education would be a great thing for training our citizens and attracting businesses.”
Both judges took questions from the group, including those about broadband service, stating they are both pushing hard for improved broadband which would benefit the residents of both counties. Several questions concerned crime. Both judges agreed that Hot Springs Village has a lower crime rate than either Benton or Hot Springs. Judge Davis said, “Probably 70% of crime in our area is based on drugs and alcohol.”
In closing their State of the Counties address, the judges offered a quote from author John Lothrop Motley who said, “Local government is the lifeblood of liberty.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

 

HSV Rotarians enter hidden world of Majestic



  
Villager Lisa Goodwin, who teaches at Fountain Lake Middle School and whose husband Bill is a member of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club, certainly joined those who mourned the loss of the Majestic Hotel in Hot Springs. In fact, it also meant the loss of Lisa’s childhood home. Her father, Leo Wolfe, was the long-time manager of the Majestic, serving from 1954 through 1982.
In her program for HSV Rotary on January 5, Lisa Goodwin shared rarely-seen slide photos of the hotel’s lovely interior from 2006, before it closed and was subjected to the practice of “demolition by deterioration.” The hotel was Lisa’s world growing up, calling it a “beautiful, active place.”
She recalled having the run of the property as a child, but also pitching in to help. When guests played Bingo in the lobby, young Lisa would be the Bingo caller. She acted as a “little tour guide” when visitors asked what there was to do in Hot Springs, and served as babysitter for the children of guests, who came from all over the U.S. On her college breaks, Goodwin typed personal letters welcoming arrivals who registered for the penthouse suites, and also served as the hotel’s telephone operator, using the old-style plug-in switchboard.
As Goodwin recalled, “Everyone in town came to ride the glass elevators,” but one memory especially stood out. “I always got more popular in the summer,” she said, as school friends would join her to enjoy the Majestic pool.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Sharing Christmas joy the Rotary way




Each year, the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club selects deserving local families who could use some Christmas joy, but adds a personal touch. Rotarians Darla Hollansworth and Susan McCarty spearheaded this year’s effort in which they not only collected gift bags of food items, but also included recipes by the Rotarians for their favorite holiday dishes along with providing the main ingredients. According to Hollansworth, “This makes it more thoughtful for each family and much more personal for all of us.”
While basic ingredients were being collected, one Rotarian, Pastor Walter “Bubba” Smith of Christ of the Hills United Methodist Church, was busy at his “Bubba-que” grill smoking turkeys to add to the bounty for the Christmas families. Meanwhile, two families in special need were selected for Christmas shopping trips to local stores. McCarty took them on their shopping trips, and reported back that not only were they able to buy basics for the family, but she got to know more about them.
McCarty discovered that one family is losing their rental home since the house they were living in has been sold. They are finding it difficult to locate other affordable housing. Therefore, this Christmas the family is scattered among various friends for shelter. Without being asked, Rotarians at the December 15 meeting contributed cash offerings to help the family. That’s the Rotary way!
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary Welcomes Chamber’s Michael Dollar





Michael Dollar, executive director of the Hot Springs Village Area Chamber of Commerce, received a warm welcome on December 8 when he visited the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village. He was introduced by community leader Bob Shoemaker who said that Dollar was doing “an unusually fine job.”
Dollar noted that this year marks the Chamber’s 20th anniversary. Its original mandate was to provide Hot Springs Village with its own Chamber of Commerce so that its citizens and community members would profit. “Fourteen organizations joined that first year,” said Dollar. “Today there are 524 active members representing 320 organizations,” adding that Chamber membership is open to individuals as well as businesses and other groups. He said that more than a quarter of Chamber members are non-profits.
He mentioned some of the services that the Chamber offers to its members and to the community, such as speaking out on rising energy costs, organizing the annual Business Expo, sponsoring a candidates’ forum, pursuing economic development, and forging links with surrounding communities. “The Chamber is active is helping form the impressions of the community in such areas as business, amenities and entertainment,” Dollar said.  
He added that this is the time of year when all Villagers can help the Chamber recognize those who make our community such a great place to live. The Chamber is currently accepting nominations in various categories for outstanding people and organizations in the Village. The nominations are rated by out-of-state judges, with winners announced at the banquet in February.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary learns about Saline County CTE




Lamont Cornwell, executive director of the Saline County Economic Development Corporation and former state legislator, visited the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village on December 1. To begin his program, he asked one question of the community leaders in the room: How many worked at what they thought they would be doing after high school? Not many hands went up.
With the help of the lively animation contained in his onscreen program, Cornwell brought a vague concept to life: the proposed Saline County Career Technical Education center, or CTE. Its presence would make Saline County one of the few in the nation to house a CTE, a significant factor not only in training our young people for today’s competitive global economy, but also in attracting desirable business and industries to the area.
Cornwell described the process of consensus-building as several hundred businesses and educators were surveyed to determine both what is needed and what can reasonably be taught. Next, Cornwell’s group found an ideal piece of land on which the CTE could be located. The CTE would not be limited only to high school students but also provide a senior adult venue for the continuing education of professionals such as healthcare specialists, insurance providers, etc.
The estimated cost for construction of the 114,000-square-foot facility would be just over $28 million, but Cornwell stressed the return on investment to voters of the community. He said, “When we present the proposed sales tax to the voters, we will show the benefits. There is no downside for the community, business, education, parents or students, especially when you factor in job creation and attracting business and industry. The CTE is a total win-win proposition.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary hears about disaster “from the inside out”



   Many Rotarians feel their club boasts members with remarkable backgrounds. That was confirmed on October 27 as the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed one of its own as a speaker, U.S. Army General Tom Arwood, recently inducted into the Arkansas Military Veterans Hall of Fame.
Arwood chose to share a little-known facet of his career, leading the relief effort in Florida in the aftermath of 1992’s Hurricane Andrew, the worst such disaster suffered by the U.S. to that time. Millions of people were affected, hundreds of thousands were homeless, and almost everyone was without food, water, medical supplies, power, and basic services. Club members were spellbound as Arwood described working a disaster “from the inside out.”
Due to his experience during Desert Storm in which he helped move a half million people across the world, Arwood was tapped by the White House to head for Florida immediately after being contacted on the golf course at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.
Arwood and his troops raced to devastated central Florida as 15,000 trucks with donations from across the country were headed to the disaster zone. Seeing the need to set up relief stations to safely receive the contributions, he also was in charge of ordering a few supplies: “10,000 radios (with batteries); 37,000 cots; 100,000 blankets; and 600,000 MREs (Meals Ready to Eat),” he recalled. After seeing a dazed senior citizen carrying canned goods in her arms but no way to open them, he added a request for 10,000 can openers.
His fascinating talk ended with one request: at Veterans Day, let us also remember service members who come to our aid in times of disaster.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

 

Parks and Tourism director visits HSV Rotary



At its October 20 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Joe David Rice, director of the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism. Rice has been the state’s tourism director since 1987 and manages a 65-person team to enhance the image of Arkansas and bring more visitors to the state.
He asked the Rotary group to imagine Arkansas as a theme park, saying, “The three things that ensure a theme park’s success are to be clean and safe, to offer new attractions, and to have the proper promotion that entices people to visit. Arkansas has all three.”
Rice focused on some of the newer attractions in the state, especially those that center around its natural beauty. Bicyclists and motorcyclists bring hundreds of millions of dollars in economic benefits to the state, according to a Parks and Tourism report. Arkansas also boasts outstanding mountain bike trails, as noted by the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA). Regional ride centers and trails around Hot Springs bring many visitors to this area. Arkansas’ popularity as a mountain biking destination led to its selection as host of the IMBA conference in November. Rotarian and avid mountain biker Tim Culbreth, director of Teen Challenge, underscored the popularity of mountain biking in the Hot Springs area.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.

 

Harmony Bridge brings warm note to HSV Rotary




At its October 13 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Patrick Combs, band director for Fountain Lake schools, and special guest Michael Levine of the Dallas Brass. Levine was praised by the many Rotarians who had attended the recent Dallas Brass concert at Woodlands Auditorium, a concert many called “perfect.”
Levine was visiting the HSV Rotary Club to introduce a program in partnership with other Rotary clubs and public schools in the state, including Fountain Lake. After an impromptu performance at a nursing home several years ago, he noticed how music brought great joy to the residents. Levine created the Harmony Bridge Project, which is designed to connect high school music students with senior living facilities around the country.  
Band director Combs invited HSV Rotary to help coordinate the project in our area. Harmony Bridge currently works with other Rotary clubs in Arkansas including Mountain Home. Both Levine and Combs noted the benefits as Harmony Bridge brings generations together through music. Levine describes the three-part program of learning music, presenting a live performance and interacting with senior care residents as a Golden Triangle with the benefits of music spanning both age groups. "There's magic that occurs when you put kids and live music together with elderly people who enjoy hearing it so much," said Levine. "It's just win-win in every way.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Brigadier General Hutchins-Frye enthralls HSV Rotary




At its October 6 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Brigadier General Tamhra Hutchins-Frye, a Villager and the first female general of the Arkansas Air National Guard. Hutchins-Frye joined the Arkansas Air National Guard in 1984 and is now the director of joint Army/Air Force staff. She has been deployed to Afghanistan and is the first woman to obtain the rank of Brigadier General in the Arkansas Air National Guard.
With a strong contingent of former military personnel in the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village, Hutchins-Frye was among friends. After visiting with Major General Tom Arwood, a Villager and club member who was chosen for induction into the Arkansas Military Hall of Fame in November, Hutchins-Frye’s presentation was introduced by retired Air Force Colonel Harv Shelton.
Hutchins-Frye oversees joint staff at Little Rock Air Force Base, Camp Robinson in North Little Rock, and Fort Chafee near Fort Smith. After showing a video of the Guard’s work, Hutchins-Frye said, “One of our big missions is to protect you, the citizens, in such things as disaster relief such as ice missions to help people on the road and rescue them if they are stranded.” She also noted that Little Rock Air Force Base serves about 53,000 retirees, many of whom come from the Village.
However, sharing her own career path into the military after being an elementary school teacher, she had words of advice for young people: “You may have goals and think you have a path to reach them, but never give up on your goals even if you have to go sideways to get there.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Story behind 2016 Impact Report at HSV Rotary




At its September 29 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Villager Lu Otto to discuss the 2016 HSV Impact Report, with Otto stating he wished to provide “the story behind the report.” He said the Impact Report is “the most comprehensive collection of data and information on Hot Springs Village, and the question now is what we do with it to use it to our best advantage.” The full Impact Report is available for viewing and downloading at the Governmental Affairs Committee website, www.hsvgac.com.
He said the report includes information tracing how the Village has moved from a “development” to an established community. The report shows how Hot Springs Village started as a “recreational and second home” area, but is now “residential, relocation and recreational.” He stated that statistics show if the Village was an incorporated township, it would be among the top 30 largest towns in Arkansas, adding that Hot Springs Village makes a significant social and economic impact to the entire state, not just the region in which it lies.
Otto said he especially wished to recognize the work of HSV Rotarians Susan McCarty, David Whitlow and Jim Zahnd in making the report possible. He closed by saying, “Let’s not refer to it as “The Village” but “OUR Village.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Jessieville school administrators update HSV Rotary




At its September 22 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed Jessieville School Superintendent Ralph Carter along with Michael Holdeness, music teacher and site coordinator for the 21st Century Initiative, Jessieville’s afterschool program. They were introduced by Rotarian Susan Clark, director of the Cedar Mountain Boys and Girls Club, a partner in the afterschool program.
After Carter’s general overview, Holdeness discussed the afterschool program, noting that students who participate show higher test scores and literacy rates than students who don’t. In his other role, as music teacher and band director, he encouraged Villagers who might have old musical instruments in their attics to donate them to the school band.
In addition, Villagers who have skills in such subjects as woodworking, tae kwan do, gardening or other areas are also needed as volunteers in the afterschool programs.
Holdeness also encouraged individual Villagers to become what he called an “antidote to the news, which can often be depressing.” Along with helping young people by tutoring, helping with homework, or practicing music, Villagers can also be mentors and role models simply by demonstrating good morals and positive values.
Both Carter and Holdeness stated Jessieville is a great place to be. In Dr. Carter’s words, “Jessieville schools have good kids, good teachers, good staff and a positive outlook.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


“Thanks” from HSV Rotary grant recipients



“Thanks” from HSV Rotary grant recipients
At its September 15 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village was treated to heartwarming messages from recipients of the club’s grant funding this year. Villager Gary Jacobs, grants committee chair, reported to club members that their fundraising efforts yielded grants which were awarded to 15 worthy causes identified by the grants committee. All 15 recipients sent “thank-you” notes.
It has been said that Rotarians put the “fun” in “fundraising.” The one thing Rotarians enjoy more than raising money for worthy causes is giving it away. Area nonprofits are invited to submit proposals for Rotary grants, with funds to be used for a specific purpose. Organizations interested in applying for a grant may visit the Rotary website (below) under “Forms & Documents/Gift Request.”
Jacobs shared thank-you letters from Potter’s Clay and the Junior Golf Association along with one from Starting Over Ministries stating they were able to purchase eight twin beds for kids which made the children’s faces light up. There was a photo card from the Fountain Lake Band’s trip to Washington D.C., where they performed on the Fourth of July. Mid America Science Museum thanked Rotary on behalf of students who would not otherwise be able to explore the exhibits. The Wheelchair Foundation sent a photo of their recipient using his new wheelchair, and the Arkansas Freedom Fund described the wounded veteran who lost 75 pounds after receiving his special bike and is now on his way to better health.
HSV Rotary is also saying “Thank you” – to all who attend the Rotary events which help fund these worthy projects.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Hot Springs Film Festival update for HSV Rotary




At its September 8 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed fellow Villager Ann Workman who presented one of the most anticipated programs of each year, her annual look at the upcoming Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival. This year’s festival dates are October 7-16. It’s the 25th year for the prestigious event that attracts filmmakers and guests from around the world. Some big-name participants even return each year for the chance to visit Hot Springs. Villagers are in a unique position to take advantage of a true Arkansas gem.
There will be a discounts for members of AARP, which promoted the festival nationwide in the September issue of the AARP Bulletin. This year’s line-up will feature world premier presentations as well as documentaries centered around Debbie Reynolds (whose son will be in attendance); Billy Hayes of “Midnight Express;” a 50-year Star Trek Tribute, “For the Love of Spock;” a return visit from “Good Ol’ Freda,” long-time secretary to The Beatles; “I Am the Blues,” a musical journey through the Louisiana Bayou, and for any fishing enthusiasts in the Village, a film called “The Memory of Fish.” There will also be a very moving documentary sponsored by the Sister Cities Foundation about American servicemen at Hiroshima.
Many Villagers sign up in late spring to serve as volunteers at the event, becoming the people who make it happen. The festival takes place at the Arlington, just minutes from the Village gates, so it’s a great bonus for living in Hot Springs Village. For more information, the Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival website is www.hsdfi.org.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Smart911 info for HSV Rotary





Smart911 info for HSV Rotary

At its August 25 meeting, the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village welcomed J.P. French, Arkansas’ state director of the Smart911 program. After his presentation, club members left “smarter” than when they arrived. Many were not familiar with the life-saving program that is free to individuals, families, and even public entities like houses of worship or retirement homes.
Smart911 works closely with the HSV Police Department as well as LifeNet so first responders are already familiar with the specifics before arriving at the scene. After entering a free Safety Profile, the information appears on the dispatcher’s screen as soon as a 911 emergency call is made. It might include medical allergies, conditions like diabetes, emergency contacts, even pets in the house in case of fire. The Smart911 profile dramatically improves response time, both in a medical emergency and situations like home intrusion. Photos can be uploaded in case a loved one goes missing, so the alert can go out even before first responders arrive at the home.
Individuals can upload as much or as little information as they wish, with the information available only to 911 responders. The Smart911 program is especially good for people who do not have a landline, just a cellphone. For more information, see the website Smart911.com.  
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on facebook.com/hsvrotary.


HSV Rotary hears about online pharmaceutical perils




Al Lewis has lived in Hot Springs Village for 30 years, and has made many friends. At the August 4 meeting

of the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club, he made a few more as he described his work to protect people from

unscrupulous sellers of online pharmaceuticals.

Due to the rising cost of prescription drugs, many people are looking online to find bargains.

However, according to the Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacies (ASOP), up to 97% of online providers are

“rogue.” Many are sourced in Russia or China, including some who claim to be in Canada.

Lewis, whose granddaughter is involved with ASOP, pointed out instances when the ingredients,

produced in filthy conditions, were found to contain ingredients such as rat poison. He also described one

case in which a patient ordered prescription medication online, kept getting sicker, and at the suggestion of

a family member, had the pills analyzed. They were 100% chalk.

According to Lewis, ASOP is the only nonprofit organization solely dedicated to making the Internet

safer for patients. Its members include pharmacists, healthcare providers, brand-name and generic

pharmaceutical companies, government agencies and internet commerce companies who are thoroughly

vetted for safety. Says Lewis, “If they don’t belong to an accredited group, how do you know what you’re

taking?”

The PowerPoint presentation by Lewis, “Real or Rogue?” is available to all at

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nou9mVi4Dks. More information about the Alliance for Safe Online

Pharmacies is at www.safeonlinerx.com.

Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs

Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m.

Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about

HSV Rotary or to see speakers and programs, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on

facebook.com/hsvrotary.

Larry Wilson Named HSV Rotary Rotarian of the Year




On June 24, the annual “Change of Gavel” dinner for the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club took place in
order to install new officers and recognize outstanding Rotarians for their contributions. One of the most
prestigious honors is being named “Rotarian of the Year.” Villager Larry Wilson earned this year’s award.
“I was really caught off guard by the Rotarian of the Year award,” said Wilson. This was because
when the award was announced, he was busy handling the audio/visual/technological duties for the event,
just as he does at weekly club meetings as well as special occasions. “I was doing my thing with
technology when outgoing president Linda Johnson made the announcement,” said Wilson. Accepting the
enthusiastic acclaim of the guests, he later said that the reaction of the membership spoke volumes. “To be
recognized for doing something you love to do is very gratifying,” he said.
As a former teacher, Wilson says he really did not have the time to devote to civic organizations.
But when he was able, Wilson says he found Rotary to be appealing because of its mission and purpose,
having an emphasis on “Service Above Self.” Wilson says, “I have always felt the need to be an active
member of any group I have associated with. HSV Rotary appealed to me because of the people I knew
who were Rotarians.”
At each weekly meeting, Wilson can be found creating a slide show that presents visual images for
the members. He records programs, posts them on the Internet, and provides technological support for
special events. “I felt my niche with Rotary was to use my technology skills to present our club in an
effective way to the members and other interested parties.” Wilson also posts the weekly club Bulletins on
the HSV Rotary website, making them available to all interested people.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs
Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7
a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information
about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on
facebook.com/hsvrotary.


Fred Kalsbeek Receives Clark Deem Award



On June 24, as new officers were announced at the annual “Change of Gavel” dinner for the Hot Springs
Village Rotary Club, a special award was presented. Villager Frederick Kalsbeek earned the prestigious
Clark Deem award, named for a beloved former member who was both a founder and long-time member of
the club.
The Clark Deem Award honors the man who had previously served in many leadership roles as a
Rotarian when he moved to Hot Springs Village in 1978. He soon found that there was no Rotary Club in
the Village. Deem joined the historic National Park Rotary Club in Hot Springs and began working to
establish a Rotary Club in Hot Springs Village. His efforts succeeded in 1985 with the chartering of the HSV
Rotary Club, where Deem became very active. Long-time members say that Deem’s sense of community
helped make Hot Springs Village a better place to live and call home.
This year’s winner of the Clark Deem Award, Fred Kalsbeek, joined the HSV Rotary Club in 2008,
and says, “I am very honored to have received this award named for our Club’s founder.” The honor was
awarded to Kalsbeek in recognition of his service as chair of the club’s Foundation program for the past
four years, plus his service on the Board of Directors for five years. Says Kalsbeek, “In fiscal year 2016, our
club donated a record $16,300 to support the charitable work done by Rotary International. This includes
both the Polio Eradication program and many other activities that improve the lives of needy children and
adults worldwide. The real credit for the Clark Deem Award goes to our club members who donated so
generously, and continue to do so.”
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs
Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7
a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information
about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it out on
facebook.com/hsvrotary.



HSV Rotary Introduces 2016-17 Officers



On June 24, the annual “Change of Gavel” dinner for the Hot Springs Village Rotary Club took place at the DeSoto Center. Amid fun and fellowship, the focus of the evening was the installation of officers for the 2016-17 Rotary year. Outgoing president Linda Johnson literally passed the gavel to incoming president Donna Aylward who serves through the remainder of 2016 and into 2017. The club’s president-elect is Steve Wright who will serve in the top position beginning July 1, 2017.
Other leadership positions include Nancy Hendricks as vice-president, Harv Shelton as treasurer, and Jim Zahnd as secretary.
The Board of Directors consists of those who lead the club’s areas of service. These include (alphabetically) Paul Bridges in charge of service projects, Mary Christians as membership chair, Gary Jacobs leading the grants program, Frederik Kalsbeek heading up the Rotary Foundation, fundraising chair Lydia McCarthy, Jerry Sorenson in the public relations position, and club service led by Bob Sweeten. Larry Wilson acts as webmaster, and has begun adding videos to the club’s weekly bulletin, available at the club website and open to all interested members of the public.
Continuing in his position, the Assistant District Governor is Anthony Cifelli. In this spot, he serves as the connection between the Rotary Club of Hot Springs Village and Rotary District 6170, which includes clubs alphabetically from Arkadelphia to Warren in addition to Hot Springs-area sister clubs such as the historic Hot Springs National Park Club and the Scenic 7 Rotary Club, which had its genesis with the HSV Rotary Club.
Rotary membership is open to all men and women, with guests always welcome at the Hot Springs Village club which meets in the Fireside Dining Room at Good Sam’s, 121 Cortez Road, Thursdays at 7 a.m. Visitors are encouraged to attend the entertaining, informative club programs. For more information about HSV Rotary and to see upcoming speakers, visit www.hsvrotary.org or check it
out on facebook.com/hsvrotary. Incoming HSV Rotary Club officers for 2016-2017 are Villagers (from left): Paul Bridges, Jim Zahnd, Harv Shelton, Steve Wright, incoming president Donna Aylward, Bob Sweeten, Jerry Sorenson, Lydia McCarthy, outgoing president Linda Johnson, and Frederick Kalsbeek (not pictured: Nancy Hendricks, Gary Jacobs, Larry Wilson)